Jazz dance – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 19:54:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz dance – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 “How are we going to survive”? Pub and club owners say they are devastated by ‘ridiculous’ Covid-19 measures https://medfordjazz.org/how-are-we-going-to-survive-pub-and-club-owners-say-they-are-devastated-by-ridiculous-covid-19-measures/ https://medfordjazz.org/how-are-we-going-to-survive-pub-and-club-owners-say-they-are-devastated-by-ridiculous-covid-19-measures/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 19:30:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/how-are-we-going-to-survive-pub-and-club-owners-say-they-are-devastated-by-ridiculous-covid-19-measures/ New ‘discriminatory’ public health measures have been announced for the hospitality and event sectors that have left industries with ‘less clarity than ever’. While the hospitality, entertainment and nightlife economy sectors may reopen fully on Friday, they can only do so with “the full range of safeguards in place.” Affected industries have called the “puzzling” […]]]>

New ‘discriminatory’ public health measures have been announced for the hospitality and event sectors that have left industries with ‘less clarity than ever’.

While the hospitality, entertainment and nightlife economy sectors may reopen fully on Friday, they can only do so with “the full range of safeguards in place.”

Affected industries have called the “puzzling” measures “insane”.

These include allowing full capacity for indoor and outdoor live events, but requiring the audience to be seated. People can only stand or dance for them in these places. But nightclubs allow you to dance, unmasked. And table service will always be required for all hospitality venues other than nightclubs.

Shane Dunne, managing director of Cork’s Indiependence music festival and promoter at MCD Productions, called the new measures “discriminatory”. “Today is a devastating day for the commercial live music industry in Ireland,” he wrote on Twitter.

“It’s getting more and more ridiculous. You can [have] 300 people on a club dance floor but not on the Whelans floor?

“Can anyone explain the science behind standing in a club is okay and standing at a concert is not okay?” ” He asked.

DJ Stevie Grainger, aka Stevie G, said he was “even more confused” about what to expect from his industry following today’s government announcement. While the measures are unlikely to impact his free concerts at Cork’s River Lee Hotel on Friday and Sunday nights during the Cork Jazz Festival, he said the announcement made life difficult for music promoters in all the countries.

“If the people running the shows can’t understand what’s going on, how can they explain it to others? It is very confusing. There is less clarity than ever now, ”he said.

Ed O’Leary of The Good Room who has concerts including Yasiin Bey (formerly known as Mos Def) booked for this weekend in Cork, also said the measures were confusing.

“There are a lot of mixed messages. You can dance in a nightclub, but you cannot in a hall unless you are next to your seat. Again, it was not thought out correctly.

“It is good news that we are able to operate at full capacity. But it is very late now. Mr. O’Leary and his team are now required to email all ticket holders to explain that if they don’t have a Covid Pass, they can’t come to the site as the requirement to show a Covid pass before entering indoor sites has been extended.

“We will have a number of refunds to make without a doubt,” he said.

“People from all over the country come to Cork for Jazz Weekend. People have booked a show and they are not sure if they can go now. It is very frustrating.”

Ger Kiely, owner of Cyprus Avenue concert hall in Cork and Old Oak bar, said his area was in chaos following “absurd” government decisions.

“These are decisions made by people who have no understanding of the industry,” he said.

“We were told we can run at full capacity, but you can’t sit upright at full capacity, that would be a fire hazard.

“Seating concerts reduce capacity to less than 50%. You can’t run concerts at less than 50% capacity, you just can’t cover your costs, ”Kiely said.

“What do we do with the acts we booked this weekend?” What do we tell our staff? Do we tell them all, “Can’t we afford to pay you?” ”

“What do we do with all the people who have booked tickets with us? Do we reimburse everyone, sit on our hands and do nothing?

“Months and months of work have gone into this weekend alone. We need an income, we haven’t had an income for 18 months.

“How are we going to survive? “

However, concerns that Christmas parties may have to be canceled because no more than 10 adults can be seated at a table in hospitality areas have been assuaged somewhat by Adrian Cummins of the Restaurants Association of Ireland.

“If you can organize black tie events for up to 100 people for business events, which has happened in the past with IBEC, Christmas parties can certainly happen now if they call them ‘business events. “. People will use their own ingenuity to comply with the directive, ”he said.

He called on Fáilte Ireland to “step back” from negotiations with the government on behalf of the hotel industry and “leave the professionals there” to liaise with policymakers instead.

The announcement that pubs must continue with mandatory table service while not allowing patrons to sit or stand at the bar until February at the earliest is a devastating blow to an industry that expected to see all restrictions removed this week, the Federation of Irish Vintners (VFI) said.

And maintaining the restrictions will result in further pub closures as mandatory table service drastically reduces venues capacity, the PFD warned.


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Meet the dancer who went from Ailey school to winning the hip-hop championships https://medfordjazz.org/meet-the-dancer-who-went-from-ailey-school-to-winning-the-hip-hop-championships/ https://medfordjazz.org/meet-the-dancer-who-went-from-ailey-school-to-winning-the-hip-hop-championships/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 00:15:16 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/meet-the-dancer-who-went-from-ailey-school-to-winning-the-hip-hop-championships/ Photo by Nathan Sayers Iyanna started dancing in her hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, when she was just 2 years old with ballet and tap dance lessons. Between the ages of 5 and 9, she took a break from her formal training, but never lost her passion for art. In fact, she was often found […]]]>

Photo by Nathan Sayers

Iyanna started dancing in her hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, when she was just 2 years old with ballet and tap dance lessons. Between the ages of 5 and 9, she took a break from her formal training, but never lost her passion for art. In fact, she was often found composing her own dance routines with her friends back home.

At 10, she decided to try the classes again and was introduced to a multitude of other styles, including jazz, hip hop and contemporary, at local studios like BB Dance Productions, Charlotte Performing Arts Academy and Miller Street. Dance Academy. But it wasn’t all sun and rainbows – the other dancers had been practicing all those years she had been away, and she had some serious catching up to do. Fortunately, this didn’t hold her back, but increased her determination to succeed. “It pushed me more than ever!”

Beyond her training delays, Iyanna had to develop the mental toughness to deal with the issues nearly all black dancers face in the industry. “As an African American in dance, when you show up for auditions and you’re the only one there, you have to push 10 times harder,” she says. “I went to an audition for a crash course and was approached by a girl who asked me my name and then told me how surprised she was that I came to the audition, because so many ‘blacks’ usually don’t come, ”Iyanna recalls. “This particular line really got me to analyze how biased people can be and how underestimated a black dancer could be. I really believe if it had been hip-hop intensive , not a ballet, that ‘surprised’ feeling she had would not have been there. ”

For Iyanna, times like these served as motivators. “Without these hardships I have been through, I know for sure that I would not be where I am today,” she says. But she relied heavily on her support system of friends, family and teachers to make her feel encouraged throughout the process.

Iyannna Jackson stands in a hinged lunge in fourth position with her arms diagonally across.

Photo by Nathan Sayers

For inspiration, she also turned to examples of resilience and success, like Misty Copeland. “Knowing that Misty started dancing in her early teens and seeing where she is now is absolutely amazing,” she says. In 2015, Jasmine Harper taught a master class at one of Iyanna’s studios, which strengthened her faith in her dancing dreams. “Everything Jasmine shared about her journey and how she was doing in this industry as a dancer of color was super inspiring.”

Currently enrolled in her sophomore year at NYU Tisch School of the Arts (something she describes as a total dream), Iyanna’s future goals include creating her own dance film, an awards ceremony, and performing. dance on Broadway. “I grew up watching so many amazing shows on Broadway, and one of my biggest fears was singing in front of people, so I’d love to get over that,” she says. With her history of overcoming obstacles, there is no doubt that she will be ready to seize the opportunity and live her dreams.

“Iyanna was a joy to have in class. Her work ethic and attention to detail were so appreciated. She lit up the studio with her unique personality. Not only was she determined, but she was so fun to be around. deserving of any recognition to come! “- Siara Fuller, Artistic Director of the Charlotte Performing Arts Academy

Iyanna Jackson jumps aside.

Photo by Nathan Sayers

Fast facts on Iyanna

Go-to dance power move: “An antenna in a needle”

Favorite Broadway Shows:The Lion King, Aladdin and Bad girls

Best advice she ever received: “Don’t just be perfect, because the more you to try, the less you will be to be perfect.” —Miss Denise, Iyanna’s dance teacher at Miller Street Dance Academy

Something you will always find in her dance bag: “A long pair of socks”

Who she would like to dance with on stage: “FKA twigs, Sabrina Claudio and Ravyn Lenae”

Hobbies outside of dance: “Making music, writing poems, baking, baking, shopping and playing basketball even though I’m really bad at it.”

Choreographers with whom she would like to work: “Andy Pellick and Travis Wall”

If she wasn’t a dancer, she would be: “A chef!”

Tips for DS readers: “Comparison is the biggest setback. The more you compare, the more you try to be something that you are not. It’s okay to support and admire others, but find out who you are and don’t be. don’t do it. This is one of the most important things all dancers do. Know that it is okay not to have understood it 100% by now. Relax, take your time and follow through the stream. “

Iyanna is one of three finalists for the Cover Model Research. Learn more about the other finalists and vote here!


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The winds of time blow through their gray hair as Graywind follows the dream https://medfordjazz.org/the-winds-of-time-blow-through-their-gray-hair-as-graywind-follows-the-dream/ https://medfordjazz.org/the-winds-of-time-blow-through-their-gray-hair-as-graywind-follows-the-dream/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:46:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-winds-of-time-blow-through-their-gray-hair-as-graywind-follows-the-dream/ Stepping into a local music scene is never easy, but Dugout Sports Bar in downtown Hendo does its part to keep fresh musical blood flowing in the ears of patrons who always want more, different and more. better. “Mike Griffin, owner of Dugout, has taken his extremely valuable time and great reputation to promote and […]]]>

Stepping into a local music scene is never easy, but Dugout Sports Bar in downtown Hendo does its part to keep fresh musical blood flowing in the ears of patrons who always want more, different and more. better.

“Mike Griffin, owner of Dugout, has taken his extremely valuable time and great reputation to promote and provide us with the opportunity to bring fresh and different live music to his extremely musically intellectual crowds,” said Blu Ramakis, the drummer for Graywind Band. “Mike and I hold each other in very high regard on many levels.”

Graywind, a group of four seasoned musicians based in Brevard, will play the canoe this Saturday evening, bringing their collective talents and years of experience to demanding clients.

In the two years since Graywind was trained by bassist Mike Grant and keyboardist George Limbo, he has performed in Hendersonville about once a month, almost exclusively at the Dugout.


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Catja the camel abroad | The voice of the college https://medfordjazz.org/catja-the-camel-abroad-the-voice-of-the-college/ https://medfordjazz.org/catja-the-camel-abroad-the-voice-of-the-college/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 15:12:14 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/catja-the-camel-abroad-the-voice-of-the-college/ Photo courtesy of Catja Christensen ’23 Major (s) and course: English and double major dance; Media, rhetoric and communication journey What program are you enrolled in? King’s College London What made you choose this program? KCL is known for its English Literature Department, which is one of the oldest and largest in the UK. They […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Catja Christensen ’23


Major (s) and course: English and double major dance; Media, rhetoric and communication journey

What program are you enrolled in? King’s College London

What made you choose this program? KCL is known for its English Literature Department, which is one of the oldest and largest in the UK. They offered such specific and fascinating courses. I am interested in the study of postcolonial and multicultural literature, and I thought, where better to talk about imperialism and colonialism than in England?

How did you adapt to life in England? This is my first time traveling abroad, and flying alone during Covid was a bit nerve-racking. Still, after getting over the jet lag and motion sickness pretty quickly, I absolutely love it here. I really didn’t expect to like it that much! It’s easier because it’s an English speaking country, but since a lot of people speak different languages ​​here, I was inspired to pick up French again so as not to be this American monolingual. The tube and public transport are wonderful, and I spent my first two weeks before class started traveling through central London with my new international friends. It is also the first time that I live in such a big city. I am from the DC area, but London is just on another level in every way. There is always something to do or somewhere to go, and we’ve created a huge KCL discussion group overseas where anyone can write where and when they’re going somewhere, and people will follow. It was a great way to make friends and be a tourist between classes.

Were there any clichés that turned out to be true or false? People actually drink a ton of tea here. And I like it. The Twinings flagship store, which at 300 years is the oldest in London, is on the Strand Campus, so I stocked up on tea. It’s also funny how nobody really knows which way to look for the cars since they are driving on the other side of the road. Some sidewalks have “Look Right” or “Look Both Ways” painted near the sidewalk, but my friends and I all look very quickly in all directions and then sprint hoping for the best. It also didn’t rain as much as I expected. Rainstorms usually come in short gusts, so I learned the hard way to always keep an umbrella with me, but we rarely have constant rainy days. Let’s touch wood.

What is your housing situation? How is? I live in the Waterloo district of central London in an apartment with six other Americans (total coincidence —- the other apartments are much more mixed in nationality). My room is like a standard dormitory, but a big plus is having a small powder room-bathroom in my room! No need to go down the hall to take a shower. I also don’t have a meal plan here, so my roommates and I share the common kitchen in our apartment. It was nice to cook, and I even made soup for everyone when we all had a bad case of Fresher’s flu (a persistent bad cold – we all tested negative for Covid multiple times). ). The downside is that we had to buy so many kitchen items like pots, pans, knives, utensils, spatulas, plates, glasses, etc. My building is the cheapest and most basic of all of King’s accommodations, but honestly you can’t beat the location. We are a 20 minute walk from the Strand and Guy campuses (2 of 4 King’s campuses) and Waterloo station is right across the street so we have easy access to all of London. My absolute favorite part of my room is that I have a view of the Shard, an iconic skyscraper, from my window, and waking up to see it every day is just surreal.

What does a typical day look like? My typical day is very different from Conn’s. My classes are all held on the Strand Campus, which is a general area of ​​the city that includes buildings that are located far apart. In Conn, nothing is more than a 10 minute walk away, but here my closest class is 15-20 minutes away. Luckily I don’t have to depend on public transport so I save money and don’t worry about delays, but it was a bit difficult at first to figure out how to find all the buildings and navigate through the labyrinth of rooms inside. Google Maps has been a lifeline.

I have four pre-recorded or online lectures and four in-person seminars each week, each one hour long. It’s weird to have so little synchronous classroom time, but it’s amazing to be in a classroom again. My seminars run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., so my days seem oddly spaced out. I have tried studying at the castle-like Maughan Library and some nearby cafes, but my favorite study space is the rooftop terrace and cafe at the top of the Bush House university building, which was once the headquarters of the BBC for over 70 years. . I usually meet up with friends to study and chat during the strangely long stretches of my day, but other times we go on little adventures to Covent Garden or explore a new part of the city.

How has the pandemic affected your program? Did this affect your choices when you applied? The pandemic has made everything so uncertain for the entire application process starting in January. I kept telling my friends that I wouldn’t believe I was really studying abroad until I got off the plane at Heathrow. Shirley Parson, Director of Study Away, has been so patient with me as I panicked with each new travel advice or Covid-19 regulations. It was difficult to balance the news from the US versus the UK as things changed so quickly this summer. Shirley warned us before postulating that countries in the southern hemisphere were unlikely to open up, especially countries like New Zealand which were known for their intense lockdowns, so I focused on European programs. . Once I heard about King’s, I didn’t even make a back-up plan because it was already so complicated to navigate these changing regulations, and I loved the program. Fortunately, since being vaccinated in May, I haven’t had to quarantine when I arrived, and Covid testing was readily available in the US and UK, though expensive. However, in the four weeks I live here, life has been the most ‘normal’ since 2019. We still wear masks indoors for the most part, and King’s provides free Covid testing so we can be tested. twice a week, so we had the chance to live and go out in town often. The KCL Student Union also has events at the Campus Bar almost every night, where we can relax, have fun and dance the night away to questionable music from the DJ. I have found that open mic jazz nights are top notch; they’re like a mix between a mosh pit and a karaoke night, and it’s exhilarating and hilarious. It has been liberating, even though Covid-19 is still in our heads, to be able to truly relive in such an incredible city.

Are you involved in anything outside of class? I decided this semester not to focus on strict extracurricular activities for the first time in my life. I am very active in the dance department and the dance club in Conn and still am that person who rehearses all hours of the day, but I decided to take classes in London so that I could explore as much as possible. . That being said, I joined the Dance Society at King’s and was able to take ballet, salsa and jazz lessons every week which is wonderful! It’s such a positive and exciting environment, and these are great breaks to study. I decided not to audition for their competitive team so that my free time during the week could be spent traveling. Since dance is my other major at Conn which is not available at King’s, it has been fun to supplement my dance education with these classes, and I hope to take classes at other renowned dance studios in the city now that most are completely reopened again.

What advice would you give to people preparing to leave? Definitely do as much research as possible in advance, especially on the logistics of practical life. In the weeks leading up to my flight here, I was going to Google Maps every day and planning the area my apartment is in, where the nearest grocery stores were, how much the metro or buses cost, where to go. located post offices, where to go Covid Tests and how far away are the campuses. When I arrived in London at 7 a.m., with 20 minutes of sleep and lots of caffeine and adrenaline, I knew exactly how to take the tube from Heathrow to Waterloo, and I recognized all the landmarks and streets of Google Street View. The area was already visually familiar to me, and that made settling into life here much less intimidating. I became a little obsessed with research as a way to cope with travel anxiety, but it definitely made the whole adjustment period much smoother.

What do you think you would have liked to know that you know now? Studying outside the home has truly been the best decision of my life. Here every day feels like a dream and every day is a new adventure. I learn so much not only in the classroom, but also by living my life more independently than ever before. I would also like to know that I would settle down easily. Settling in is unpredictable, and so many things could have made this schedule harder to adjust, but I was so anxious and scared of how I would adjust that I had no confidence in myself. So I guess I wish I had more confidence in myself from the start. I realized that I am more capable and more confident in myself than I thought I was.

Also, I talk more about my time in London so far in Episode 2 of The Traveling Camel podcast, so if people want to hear me say how much I love it here so far and other things i learned, check it out. outside.

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Yankton Dance Team wins Mitchell Inv .; Cheer team sixth | Sports https://medfordjazz.org/yankton-dance-team-wins-mitchell-inv-cheer-team-sixth-sports/ https://medfordjazz.org/yankton-dance-team-wins-mitchell-inv-cheer-team-sixth-sports/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 03:08:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/yankton-dance-team-wins-mitchell-inv-cheer-team-sixth-sports/ MITCHELL – Yankton won the dance title and finished sixth in the Mitchell Invitational cheer and dance contest on Saturday at Corn Palace. Yankton scored 268.75 for top dance honors. The Gazelles also got top marks on Jazz (279) and Pom (258.5). Mitchell, second overall with 247.75, had the best Hip Hop score (251). Platte-Geddes […]]]>

MITCHELL – Yankton won the dance title and finished sixth in the Mitchell Invitational cheer and dance contest on Saturday at Corn Palace.

Yankton scored 268.75 for top dance honors. The Gazelles also got top marks on Jazz (279) and Pom (258.5).

Mitchell, second overall with 247.75, had the best Hip Hop score (251).

Platte-Geddes finished seventh as a team with 221.25 points. The Black Panthers have scored 218 in Pom and 224.5 in Hip Hop.

Brandon Valley won the Cheer title with a 255, while Mitchell (221) was second.

Yankton scored 181.5 for sixth place. Platte-Geddes (179) finished eighth, followed by Wagner (178.5), Bon Homme (178.5) and Parkston (175).

Yankton has its last tune-up for the state on Oct. 14, hosting the Eastern Conference Championships in South Dakota. The start time is 5 p.m. at the Watertown Civic Arena.

GRAND CHAMPION: Yankton 268.75, Mitchell 247.75, Aberdeen Central 235.75, Pierre 234.75, Huron 233.25, Winner 226.25, Platte-Geddes 221.25, Gregory 201.75

JAZZ: Yankton 279, Aberdeen Central 243.5

POM: Yankton 258.5, Pierre 246, Mitchell 244.5, Huron 224.5, Winner 220.5, Platte-Geddes 218, Gregory 194

HIP HOP: Mitchell 251, Huron 242, Winner 232, Aberdeen Central 228, Platte-Geddes 224.5, Pierre 223.5, Gregory 209.5


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Newsom signs three Glazer proposals from Contra Costa https://medfordjazz.org/newsom-signs-three-glazer-proposals-from-contra-costa/ https://medfordjazz.org/newsom-signs-three-glazer-proposals-from-contra-costa/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 18:50:35 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/newsom-signs-three-glazer-proposals-from-contra-costa/ COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed three long-standing proposals put forward by State Senator Steve Glazer D-Contra Costa that will have a direct impact on residents of Contra Costa and Alameda counties. The three proposals Gov. Newsom signed were SB 19 (wine tasting), SB 60 (short-term rental) and a provision in […]]]>

COUNTY OF CONTRA COSTA

California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed three long-standing proposals put forward by State Senator Steve Glazer D-Contra Costa that will have a direct impact on residents of Contra Costa and Alameda counties.


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LEAF Festival returns to Black Mountain with COVID protocols https://medfordjazz.org/leaf-festival-returns-to-black-mountain-with-covid-protocols/ https://medfordjazz.org/leaf-festival-returns-to-black-mountain-with-covid-protocols/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 14:45:02 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/leaf-festival-returns-to-black-mountain-with-covid-protocols/ LEAF Global Arts presents the LEAF Festival from October 14 through October 17 at Lake Eden in Black Mountain. Otto Vazquez, the artist curator of LEAF, conceives the theme, organizes the musicians and develops the program of the festival. “My main theme is called Global Citizen,” Vazquez said. “We have so many eclectic and diverse […]]]>

LEAF Global Arts presents the LEAF Festival from October 14 through October 17 at Lake Eden in Black Mountain.

Otto Vazquez, the artist curator of LEAF, conceives the theme, organizes the musicians and develops the program of the festival.

“My main theme is called Global Citizen,” Vazquez said. “We have so many eclectic and diverse influences, so many countries represented.”

LEAF promotes music, dance and culture at the festival. Having presented 56 festivals and retreats over the past 25 years, LEAF has brought together 16,043 artists representing 101 countries.

LEAF Global Arts presents the LEAF Festival at Eden Lake from October 14th.

Vazquez said the long list of artists from a multitude of different countries provided the theme for Global Citizen. This year, for the first time, the festival will also present Urban Combat Wrestling, an exhibition combining professional wrestling and hip hop performance.

“We have everything from Latin music and Americana to bluegrass, hip hop, jazz, blues, funk and everything under the sun,” Vazquez said.

The festival’s many different influences encourage diversity through a celebration of the cultures of local groups, from Africa, to the Middle East and more.

LEAF Global Arts presents the LEAF Festival at Eden Lake from October 14th.

The festival’s location in the large space by Lake Eden allows the organization to encourage festival-goers to adhere to pandemic safety guidelines. LEAF expects the festival to operate at 60% capacity with proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours for anyone aged 5 and over.

Indoors, interacting with vendors or aboard shuttles, LEAF requires festival-goers to wear masks. According to the organization, protocols are subject to change if the county changes COVID-19-related mandates.


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Lincoln Center announces passport to the arts https://medfordjazz.org/lincoln-center-announces-passport-to-the-arts/ https://medfordjazz.org/lincoln-center-announces-passport-to-the-arts/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 04:10:03 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/lincoln-center-announces-passport-to-the-arts/ Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts has announced the Passport to the Arts Fall 2021 season. The pass will provide access to lessons, shows and personalized experiences for children, adolescents and adults with disabilities and their families. Programs will include in-person screenings of “Cinderella” and “The Magic Flute” at the Metropolitan Opera as well as […]]]>

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts has announced the Passport to the Arts Fall 2021 season.

The pass will provide access to lessons, shows and personalized experiences for children, adolescents and adults with disabilities and their families.

Programs will include in-person screenings of “Cinderella” and “The Magic Flute” at the Metropolitan Opera as well as behind-the-scenes clips of “My Fair Lady” by Lerner & Loewe, lessons, site-specific theater explorations and workshops. of movement with renowned dancers and musicians.

This season includes partner programs across the Lincoln Center campus and beyond: American Ballet Theater, CO / LAB Theater Group, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Lincoln Center Theater, Metropolitan Opera, the Metropolitan Opera Guild, the New York City Ballet and the New York Philharmonic.

Here is an overview of all programs:

Adapted dance workshop with American Ballet Theater
Saturday, October 16 at 11 a.m. ET
Virtual program
Join the teaching artists of the American Ballet Theater for an interactive dance workshop where participants will explore the characters and choreography of ABT’s popular ballet “Coppélia”.

WeBop “Swing” with Jazz at Lincoln Center
Sunday, October 17 at 10:30 a.m.ET
Virtual program
This WeBop “Swing” session is designed for children aged six to nine. During this interactive, small-group program, led by musicians, families will be immersed in an authentic jazz experience as they dance to the rhythm of swing, sing the blues and improvise on homemade instruments.

Opera Fairy Tales: Cinderella with the Metropolitan Opera Guild
Saturday, October 30 at 11:00 a.m. (8-12 years old) and 1:00 p.m. (teens and adults) ET
Virtual program
Join the teaching artists of the Metropolitan Opera Guild on a fun and interactive journey through the classic Cinderella fairy tale.

My Fair Lady by Lerner & Loewe with the Lincoln Center Theater
Saturday, November 6 at 10:30 a.m.ET
Virtual program
An interactive workshop featuring video clips from Lincoln Center Theater’s 2018 Tony Award-nominated production of the classic musical “My Fair Lady”. The workshop is led by Lincoln Center Theater teaching artists Daniel and Patrick Lazour.

WeBop “Swing” with Jazz at Lincoln Center
Sunday, November 7 at 10 a.m.ET
Virtual program
This WeBop “Swing” session is designed for children aged two to five. During this interactive, small-group program, led by musicians, you will be immersed in an authentic jazz experience as you dance to the rhythm of swing, sing the blues and improvise on your homemade instruments.

WeBop “Improvisation” with Jazz at Lincoln Center
Sunday, November 7 at 12 p.m. ET
Virtual program
WeBop’s “Improvisation” session is aimed at children aged 6 to 9. During this interactive small-group class led by jazz musicians, you’ll explore the basics of jazz improvisation as you learn to listen to musical cues and respond creatively with your voice, body, and improvise on your instruments. homemade.

Dance workshop suitable for teens and adults with the New York City Ballet (NYCB)
Monday, November 15 at 6 p.m. ET
Virtual program
Join the artists of the New York City Ballet as participants are guided through a warm-up and learn choreography inspired by some of NYCB’s most beloved repertoires. This event will take place on Zoom.

Inspiring instruments with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center
Sunday, November 21 at 11:30 a.m.ET
Virtual program
In this program, we explore instruments and instrumentalists who have inspired great composers in an online program featuring live music and activities, led by educators and musicians Rami Vamos and Nurit Pacht.

Prepare the ground with the CO / LAB theater group
Saturday, December 4 at 11 a.m. ET
Virtual program
Drawing inspiration from performances that have taken place in and around Lincoln Center, we will be directing our own performances from home.

Opera Magic with the Metropolitan Opera Guild
Sunday, December 5 at 11 a.m. ET
Virtual program
An exclusive virtual look at what it takes to make opera magic.

Prepare the ground with the CO / LAB theater group
Sunday, December 5, 1 p.m. ET
Virtual program
Drawing inspiration from performances that have taken place in and around Lincoln Center, we will be directing our own performances from home.

Child-friendly / family-friendly dance workshop with the New York City Ballet (NYCB)
Sunday, December 12 at 11 a.m. ET
Virtual program
Join the artists of the New York City Ballet as participants are guided through a warm-up and learn choreography inspired by some of NYCB’s most beloved repertoires. This event will take place on Zoom.

Musical portraits: expressing myself through music with the New York Philharmonic
Sunday, December 12 at 1 p.m. ET
Virtual program
Join New York Philharmonic teaching artist Jacinta Clusellas accompanied by New York Philharmonic musician for an interactive music workshop that shows how composition can be used in a fun way.

Jazz at Lincoln Center Presents: Just Friends – Billie Holiday and Lester Young
Wednesday, December 15 at 5:30 p.m. ET
Virtual program
Join us for a special concert celebrating some of jazz’s most beloved music with a group of exceptional performers from Jazz at Lincoln Center.

Metropolitan Opera: The Magic Flute
Saturday, December 18 at 1 p.m. ET
In person program
Join us for a magical production of Mozart’s beloved fairytale opera, featuring stunning visuals and puppets. All participants must be over the age of 12 and present full proof of vaccination against Covid-19.

Metropolitan Opera: Cinderella
Sunday, December 19 at 3 p.m. ET
In person program
Celebrate a holiday tradition with the staging of Laurent Pelly’s storybook from Cendrillon de Massenet. All participants must be over 12 years of age and present full proof of Covid-19 vaccination


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Sidney Myer Creative Fellows announced https://medfordjazz.org/sidney-myer-creative-fellows-announced/ https://medfordjazz.org/sidney-myer-creative-fellows-announced/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:01:22 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/sidney-myer-creative-fellows-announced/ The Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships for 2021 have been awarded to nine Australian artists working in dance, performance, visual arts, writing, theater and music. They are: Alison Murphy-Oates (NSW), cultural leadership; Ellen van Neerven (QLD), literature; Eric Avery (NSW), music / dance; Hoda Afshar (VIC), photography; Jo Lloyd (VIC), dance, Joel Ma (VIC), music, multi-art; […]]]>

The Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships for 2021 have been awarded to nine Australian artists working in dance, performance, visual arts, writing, theater and music.

They are: Alison Murphy-Oates (NSW), cultural leadership; Ellen van Neerven (QLD), literature; Eric Avery (NSW), music / dance; Hoda Afshar (VIC), photography; Jo Lloyd (VIC), dance, Joel Ma (VIC), music, multi-art; Latai Taumoepeau (NSW), performance art; Michele Lee (VIC), theatrical writing; and Tjungkara Ken (SA), painting.

Eric Avery. Photo provided

They will each receive a tax-free grant of $ 160,000 over a two-year period. The money is not tied to any specific outcome, but the grants provide income so that each fellow has time to develop their creative practice without financial pressure.

I am delighted to make this year’s announcement and congratulate these wonderful artists. It has been a trying time for many of us, and our arts community has suffered greatly with the closure of so many shows, exhibitions and theaters. I hope this support will make a significant difference in supporting those who help us make sense of this world, ”said Andrew Myer, chair of the National Peer Review Committee for 2021 Fellows.

“My life changed because of this opportunity,” said writer Ellen van Neerven. “With this support, I can work and think long term rather than short term, and put my creative practice at the forefront of my production. “

To be nominated for a scholarship, artists and artistic directors must be between seven and 15 years old in their creative practice and must meet two criteria: exceptional talent and exceptional courage.

Musician and dancer Eric Avery said that for him “courage means continuing to develop and make art no matter what happens in your life. I started learning the violin later than most (12 years old on a toy violin) and worked really hard to develop my playing skills. I remember playing in orchestras as a teenager and I was a black child; I might not have liked it back then, but it took a lot of courage.

Avery is an Ngiyampaa, Yuin, Bandjalang, and Gumbangirr artist who is both classically trained violinist and composer, as well as a professional dancer. As a dancer he works regularly with Marrugeku. As a violinist he has worked with everyone from the Black Arm Band to the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra to the Tina Arena. In his artistic practice, he synthesizes the traditions of the classical Western violin with his ancestral cultural heritage. He has collaborated with many international artists including Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, African-American jazz violinist Regina Carter and Grammy winner Rhiannon Giddens.

Alison Murphy-Oates is an Ngiyampaa Wailwan woman from west-central New South Wales who has been dedicated to supporting the development and empowerment of First Peoples artists and art workers, as well as the growth of a network of First Peoples practitioners around the world. She is the Managing Director of Moogahlin Performing Arts and an independent producer, artistic administrator and consultant.

Michèle Lee

Michèle Lee. Photo © Victoria Scott

Ellen van Neerven was born in Brisbane and is an award-winning author, editor and educator of Mununjali (Yugambeh language group) and Dutch heritage. Ellen’s books include Heat and light, a collection of award-winning stories and poetry books Comfort food and Throat.

Hoda Afshar is an Iranian-Australian visual artist, born in Tehran and now based in Melbourne. His visual practice covers photography and the moving image and focuses on the exploration of specific social and political issues related to marginality, visibility and displacement.

Jo Lloyd is a Melbourne-based freelance choreographer, performer and teacher who has developed a distinctive voice through works including the award-winning OPENING from 2018.

Joel Ma founded the Australian rap group TZU, whose albums were nominated for the Australian Music Prize, a J Award and an APRA Award. Under the nickname Joelistics, he continued his success as a performer and music producer, which expanded into co-writing and producing credits with acts like Haiku Hands and Mo’Ju. He also has a theatrical writing credit for Between two (2015), who toured nationally, and is currently developing a TV series with producer Tony Ayres and writer Nam Le.

Latai Taumoepeau is a performance artist focused on the body. She describes her work – which combines dance and visual art – as belonging to the Tongan performance form called faiva, which translates into marking / making time and space.

Michele Lee is an Asian and Australian-born writer who works in the fields of theater, live art, audio and screen. Her works explore otherness, identity and founded families, usually through contemporary narratives that focus on the experiences of women and people of color. She has worked with the Sydney Theater Company, Malthouse Theater, Melbourne Theater Company, Queensland Theater, Griffin Theater and Red Stitch Actors’ Theater. Rice, going down and Single women. She recently received development funding from Screen Australia for her original TV comedy concept, Next big thing, in which a young theater director of Asian and Australian descent has to find a new job with an elite theater company when she is unexpectedly pregnant.

Tjungkara Ken was born in Amata, South Australia, in 1969. She is a Pitjantjatjara painter based in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) lands in the far northwest of South Australia. She is part of the Ken Sisters Collaborative which received the Wynne Prize in 2016 and was a finalist for the Archibald Prize 2017.

The peer review committee for the 2021 fellows included Andrew Myer AM (chair), Amos Gebhardt, Helen Marcou, Jeff Khan, Jo Dyer, Josh Wright and Tarun Nagesh.

Marquee TV: get 3 months for the price of 1


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The Library of Congress hosts a series of free annual concerts with world-class musicians https://medfordjazz.org/the-library-of-congress-hosts-a-series-of-free-annual-concerts-with-world-class-musicians/ https://medfordjazz.org/the-library-of-congress-hosts-a-series-of-free-annual-concerts-with-world-class-musicians/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:03:30 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-library-of-congress-hosts-a-series-of-free-annual-concerts-with-world-class-musicians/ The Library of Congress is not just a national place for academic research. You can also enjoy free live music with the institution’s annual concert series. OMCP’s Jason Fraley gives an overview of the Library of Congress concert series (Part 1) The Library of Congress is not just a national place for academic research. You […]]]>

The Library of Congress is not just a national place for academic research. You can also enjoy free live music with the institution’s annual concert series.

OMCP’s Jason Fraley gives an overview of the Library of Congress concert series (Part 1)

The Library of Congress is not just a national place for academic research.

You can also enjoy free live music with the institution’s annual festival concert series.

“The first gig was in October 1925, so it’s 97,” lead producer Anne McLean told WTOP. “We are excited for this coming season. We will have virtual and live events this coming year. It’s a very varied offering with world-class artists performing classical music, great jazz and special projects featuring both dance and spoken word.

The virtual fall season kicks off October 8 with “A Fiddler’s Tale” by Wynton Marsalis.

“This is a special program that brings together African American musicians from the best orchestras in the country, along with actor Nick Few and conductor Damien Sneed,” McLean said. “It starts with ‘The Soldier’s Tale’ by Igor Stravinsky, about a musician who sells his soul to the devil, then ‘A Fiddler’s Tale’ by Marsalis. [where] the devil is a record producer.

Next, actor Ralph Fiennes recounts “Tchaikovsky and his poets” on October 14.

“It’s a beautiful and truly lavish concert with a mezzo-soprano called Alice Coote and pianist Christian Blackshaw,” McLean said. “His voice is like an all-terrain vehicle of impressive power. … Interposed between these songs, Ralph Fiennes reads poems by Lermontov, Fet and others that were important to Tchaikovsky.

This month, the “Metamorphosis” dance and percussion event will also take place on October 30.

“This concert is so touching,” said McLean. “Third Coast Percussion, a Grammy-winning group, a quartet of percussionists put together this show called ‘Metamorphosis’. They have collaborated with fantastic dancers from Movement Art Is. Petit Buck [and] Jon Boogz are the choreographers and their motto is to use dance to inspire change in the world.

Also, don’t miss an exciting virtual concert with Hub New Music on November 5th.

“We are proud to make the virtual premiere of this piece, ‘Requiem for the Enslaved’,” said McLean. “The story is about the 272 slaves who were sold by Georgetown University to pay off construction debts for the construction of university buildings. … Carlos Simon is the composer and it’s a beautiful piece… tinged with hip-hop, jazz, R&B.

After the virtual fall season, in-person concerts resume in February.

“The concerts take place in the Coolidge Auditorium, which is part of the Jefferson Building, this magnificent building with the dome, directly across from the United States Capitol,” McLean said. “For a long time people thought, ‘It’s inside a big building, how do you get there?’ … But we want everyone in the DC metro area to come and experience the concert hall. “

See the full schedule of free concerts here.

OMCP’s Jason Fraley gives an overview of the Library of Congress concert series (Part 2)

Listen to our full conversation here.

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