Jazz instruments – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 01:48:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz instruments – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 Opera Mississippi honors jazz icon Dave Brubeck https://medfordjazz.org/opera-mississippi-honors-jazz-icon-dave-brubeck/ https://medfordjazz.org/opera-mississippi-honors-jazz-icon-dave-brubeck/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 00:40:53 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/opera-mississippi-honors-jazz-icon-dave-brubeck/ Classically trained pianist Elizabeth Brubeck taught two sons to play the family piano before her youngest boy, David, kissed the instrument, tells the story, but she couldn’t have known then that he would be the one who would create such a name for himself in the world of jazz. that the Dave Brubeck Quartet would […]]]>

Classically trained pianist Elizabeth Brubeck taught two sons to play the family piano before her youngest boy, David, kissed the instrument, tells the story, but she couldn’t have known then that he would be the one who would create such a name for himself in the world of jazz. that the Dave Brubeck Quartet would be revered a century after its birth in 1920.

Growing up in California, Dave Brubeck would develop the musical and compositional skills that would take him to the top of the jazz world by combining his mother’s classical tutelage with improvisation to become a leading performer of what is often referred to as cool jazz.

Knowing that Brubeck’s 100th birthday was last year, Opera Mississippi’s artistic director Jay Dean decided over a year ago to create a show to commemorate the iconic jazz musician.

“I like to create events that have meaning beyond a concert,” Dean said. “I like to create events that celebrate centenarians and birthdays. I like to find things that connect with people. The Sam Bruton Quartet is scheduled to perform at Duling Hall on October 18 as part of the Mississippi opera

Duling Hall Concert Series, sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Mississippi, to present “Take 5: A Tribute to Dave Brubeck”. The first performance was originally scheduled to take place in March 2020, but Opera Mississippi has postponed the celebration due to growing concerns over COVID.

Over the decades, Dave Brubeck has released dozens of albums and tracks, with “Take 5” breaking records as the best-selling jazz single in history. Photo credit Jack de Nijs Anefo

The quartet’s performance at the MP Bush Auditorium on the Jones College campus on September 24, 2021.

Dave Brubeck’s career and legacy

After learning the piano from his mother, who studied the instrument in England with Myra Hess, Dave Brubeck began accompanying local jazz groups in 1933 and for Lions Club gatherings and Western-style swing dances in the age of 14. Brubeck was later a student at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, studying music from 1938 to 1942. There he trained and conducted the school’s 12-piece orchestra.

Brubeck enlisted in the United States Army after graduation. However, he was spared the fight after his performance at a Red Cross show became a major success. During World War II he led a group in the United States Army which performed for troops serving in combat zones. Four years later, he returned from the front lines and continued his graduate studies at Mills College. He created the Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951.

Brubeck’s musical catalog spans decades, with the artist considered a major figure in the West Coast jazz movement. He started releasing albums in the early 1950s and continued until the early 2000s. He recorded “Take 5” in 1959, which became the best-selling jazz single of all time. When the quarterback played “Take 5” during the concerts, the members left the stage after their respective solos until only drummer Joe Morello remained.

The Dave Brubeck Quartet consisted of Brubeck, Morello, Paul Desmond on alto saxophone and Eugene Wright on bass in his classical years when the band recorded the famous album “Take 5”.

Sam Bruton: “Monster at the piano”

Opera Mississippi’s artistic director, Dean, felt it was essential to assemble a group of musicians who could best reproduce the classical sound of the quartet.

Dean immediately knew that his colleague Sam Bruton was the perfect person to lead the quartet.

A flyer for Dave Brubeck Tribute Concert presented by the Sam Bruton Quartet
This promotional flyer for a previous performance features the four members of the Sam Bruton Quartet who pay homage to Dave Brubeck: Sam Bruton (top left), Dave Pello (bottom left), Larry Pernella (top center) and Pete Weiner (bottom right). Dave Brubeck (bottom center) and a photo of the quartet in action (top right) are also pictured. Nathan Sanders will be the percussionist for the October 18 show at Duling Hall. Courtesy of Jones College School of Art, Music and Performance

“The first time I performed with Sam Bruton was in 2003,” said Dean, who spent 30 years as director of orchestral activities at the University of Southern Mississippi and who has retired. as director of the USM music school last June. “We played a concert together, and that was the first time I had laid eyes on him and the first time I had heard him play. The first time I heard him play, I thought: “This guy is a fabulous pianist. Sam Bruton is a monster at the piano.”

Bruton is a jazz pianist, composer, and professor of philosophy at the University of Southern Mississippi. He forms the Sam Bruton quartet with Larry Pernella, the director of jazz studies at USM, on saxophone. It also includes USM instructor Dave Pello on double bass and Pete Weiner as the band’s drummer. Nathan Sanders, a doctoral student in musical arts at USM, plays the role of drummer for the performance of Duling Hall.

“Jay Dean first contacted me to put together the squad, and I contacted (these players) because of all the players I know in Mississippi – I played with a lot of them – it were the best at capturing the classic Brubeck sound, ”said Bruton.

The quartet prepared and practiced for over a year for the performance. To date, they have presented the show at the South Festival in Hattiesburg and the Natchez Festival of Music.

“Brubeck’s repertoire of compositions is quite extensive, so we had to make decisions about what tracks to make, how to do them and exactly how much to stay true to the original as well as add our own creative flourishes,” explained Bruton. “Brubeck’s music is a challenge. It is wonderful and inspiring. It’s creative and innovative in many ways, but it’s a challenge.

The quartet will release two new songs during the Duling Hall performance, which Dean says will wow attendees.

“They are going to have a great time,” Dean said. “They are going to hear one of the best jazz quartets in the world. I heard them do this concert at the South Festival in June, and it feels like you’re in New York or Paris. It’s just a top notch game. “

Mississippi Opera 2021-2022 Preview

Opera Mississippi, the nation’s ninth-longest-running opera company, is in its 76th season.

Tonight’s performance is just one of many scheduled for the new season. After “Take 5” is another centennial celebration: “Be My Love: A Tribute to Mario Lanza” on November 8, which will feature tenor singer Peter Lake and pianist Tyler Kemp in a cabaret-style performance.

Opera Mississippi’s first performance in 2022 will be “Future of the Stage,” a gala concert on January 17 that will feature six winning singers of the John Alexander National Vocalist Competition alongside the Opera Mississippi Chamber Orchestra.

February will see “Letters to Puccini,” a program featuring many of the opera composer’s most revered arias. The opening night will take place on February 21.

Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini described soprano singer Renata Tebaldi as having “the voice of an angel,” which became the inspiration for Opera Mississippi’s March 14 performance, “La voce d’angelo” . Soprano singer Betsy Uschkrat will perform in honor of Tebaldi, with Michael Bunchman at the piano.

“Gianni Schicchi and Suor Angelica”, which premieres on April 23, is a comic opera set in 17th century Italy that revolves around a family listening and coming to terms with the reading of the late Gianni Schicchi’s will.

To complement the spring 2022 shows, “Over the Rainbow,” a tribute performance honoring Judy Garland, a Hollywood star who left behind a number of memorable works. Melanie Gardner and the TK Trio bring Garland’s most renowned songs to life on stage during the May 16 performance.

General admission for the performance of “Take 5” on Monday, October 18 is $ 30. The concert starts at 7 p.m. Duling Hall requires proof of vaccination at least 14 days before the shows or a negative COVID-19 test result received within 72 hours of the events. Opera Mississippi asks all the guests, vaccinated or not, to wear masks during the performance. For more information on tickets or to find out more about upcoming Opera Mississippi shows in the current season’s lineup, call 601-960-2300 or visit operams.org.


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Bringing jazz to life with Bob Hurst https://medfordjazz.org/bringing-jazz-to-life-with-bob-hurst/ https://medfordjazz.org/bringing-jazz-to-life-with-bob-hurst/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 21:24:35 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/bringing-jazz-to-life-with-bob-hurst/ The pandemic may have stopped live music, but on October 14 at 7:30 p.m., the UW-Whitewater Jazz One Ensemble and world-renowned guest artist Robert Hurst showed audiences that jazz is indeed living ! Presented with a timeless and classy sound, the only word to adequately describe the outcome of the evening is, success! They reminded […]]]>

The pandemic may have stopped live music, but on October 14 at 7:30 p.m., the UW-Whitewater Jazz One Ensemble and world-renowned guest artist Robert Hurst showed audiences that jazz is indeed living ! Presented with a timeless and classy sound, the only word to adequately describe the outcome of the evening is, success! They reminded everyone what it means to go out for a night and really enjoy the music, not just to listen, but to be absorbed.

The ensemble is jam-packed with an array of talented multi-instrument musicians; however, one in particular stood out, playing an instrument that brought a taste of sass to the band’s sound. Senior flautist Enrique Chambers, a flute major, was the touch of grace audiences needed to hear in the song called “Shout Me Out” by John Clayton. Playing notes almost too high for the human ear to detect, with a balance that left everyone in awe as it sounded effortless. Likewise, he was often the highlight of the pieces, serving as the finishing touch to each crescendo, playing with a passion visible behind each note.

“I am passionate about all of my instruments because music gives me a place to share what I feel and think without needing to use real words,” Chambers said.

The passion for jazz music and performance was a common theme throughout each night as Brandon Terwilliger, Lily Freeman, Alex Fiedler, David Stoler, Aidan Bray, Mckennen Tobin, Quinn Galvin and Kyle Deschner all killed their solos and proved that they were born to be over-organized. By their side throughout the night was talented musician and composer Robert Hurst, who had mentored the groups in the days leading up to the performance. His genius was visibly contagious as the tone of Mr. Hurst and the ensemble blended seamlessly together, showing audiences that his knowledge was a blessing to the music department at UW-Whitewater and the future of musicians and professors such as Dr Michael Hackett, director of representation, instruct.

“The beauties haven’t been born yet, but they obviously have been,” said Hurst, referring both to the title of the album he composed and to the student ensemble.

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How Miles Davis electrified jazz https://medfordjazz.org/how-miles-davis-electrified-jazz/ https://medfordjazz.org/how-miles-davis-electrified-jazz/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 14:59:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/how-miles-davis-electrified-jazz/ Thirty years after his death, the music of Miles Davis is in full swing. Davis defined the sound – and the sounds – of modern jazz like no other in the way he integrated the electric instrumentation of genres like rock, funk, and soul. He is one of the most influential musicians of the 20th […]]]>

Thirty years after his death, the music of Miles Davis is in full swing. Davis defined the sound – and the sounds – of modern jazz like no other in the way he integrated the electric instrumentation of genres like rock, funk, and soul. He is one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, in all genres.

This can be seen for example how often it is sampled by modern musicians.

For example, Davis can be heard providing a smooth, relaxed accompaniment to Trademark Da Skydiver’s more energetic and accentuated rap on the track Super Sticky. Listen, and after the velvet tones of John Coltrane’s tenor sax, you’ll hear the immediately recognizable plaintive moan of Davis’ muffled trumpet from his song “Flamenco Sketches” – one of Kind of Blue’s most famous tunes (1959 ), the best-selling jazz album of all time.

Hip-hop artists like The Roots, Mobb Deep, The Beatnuts, Black Moon, Heavy Da and The Boyz, Notorious BIG, Diddy, Outkast, Queen Latifah – to name a few – have all sampled the trumpeter from jazz.

Innovative jazz

Davis seemed destined for greatness from the start. His recording debut could not have been more auspicious. In 1945, failing to complete his studies at the prestigious Julliard School in New York, he replaced Dizzy Gillespie in a recording session for saxophonist Charlie Parker – the most famous jazz musician of that time, if not of any other. A night in Tunisia by Dizzy Gillespie is a good example of this session.

While Davis’ schooling in the fast-paced and aggressive 1940s bebop proved essential, it is his later work as a conductor that he is primarily remembered for.

He forms a Nonet (group of nine musicians) with an unusual formation, including French horn and tuba. Although the recordings were not an immediate success, they heralded the “cool jazz” that would prove popular with musicians unhappy with the stereotypical nature of bebop and its emphasis on virtuosity. It would be the 1957 release of the album “Birth of the Cool” containing recordings dating back to 1949, which brought the music to greater recognition.

During those intoxicating years one style quickly followed another and Davis was at the forefront of most of them. After cool jazz came “hard bop” – a return to the edginess of bebop combined with emerging “rhythm ‘n’ blues”. This can be heard in the song “When Lights Are Low” (1955). There was also the rise of “modal jazz”, using scales as the basis of melodic invention, rather than the underlying chords. The result was “Milestones” (1958), one of his masterpieces, which was soon followed by the legendary “Kind of Blue”.

These works cemented his reputation, making Davis arguably the most admired jazz musician of the 1960s. It is characteristic that Davis did not settle for this adulation but continued to experiment.

Electrifying jazz

Fascinated by rock, funk and soul, he added electric instruments – electric guitars, pianos and keyboards – as well as a catchy rhythm to his music. The result was the “fusion” and from there was born the album I “na Silent Way” (1969). Then came the “jazz rock” of “Bitches Brew” (1970). As with folk artist Bob Dylan, electrification proved risky for Davis. Part of the jazz community never forgave her for what they considered a “sellout”. However, beyond jazz, his reputation has grown steadily.

In 1975, Davis retired from the public sphere. He had long suffered from health problems, made worse by drug addiction.

It was part of the dark side of his life. While he courted controversy during his lifetime due to his drug addiction and often brooding and moody demeanor, it is his often abusive and violent treatment of women that threatens to overshadow his legacy. In 2006, his ex-wife Frances Davis claimed that she “quit the race to [her] life – more than once, ”further detailing how the musician pushed her to give up her career because, as he put it,“ A woman should be with her man. Some of his other wives and partners have made similar statements.

Davis resurfaced in 1980 and managed to continue his career until his death on September 28, 1991.

During this time, he remains open to new influences, including hip-hop, which he incorporated in his last studio album “Doo-bop” (1991). So he would almost certainly have approved of his work being sampled.

His unique talent as a composer and conductor was to bring together an often diverse group of uniquely talented, often young, musicians and to feed off their ideas – to the point that the authorship of many of his best-known pieces is contested.

For example, many believe that pianist Bill Evans composed “Blue in Green” from “Kind of Blue”. However, while it’s not always clear who contributed which rating, the results are almost always unmistakably Miles.

Björn Heile, music teacher (after 1900), Glasgow university

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Album review: Damien McGeehan – Kin https://medfordjazz.org/album-review-damien-mcgeehan-kin/ https://medfordjazz.org/album-review-damien-mcgeehan-kin/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 08:44:39 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/album-review-damien-mcgeehan-kin/ Donegal violinist Damien McGeehan traces a sprawling landscape of musical influences ranging from traditional music to Senegalese kora music on his second solo album, Close. Rooted in the melodies of Irish music, the project takes the listener on a journey of musical fluidity. Photo: Danny Diamant. Damien McGeehan slides between and mixes several genres on […]]]>

Donegal violinist Damien McGeehan traces a sprawling landscape of musical influences ranging from traditional music to Senegalese kora music on his second solo album, Close. Rooted in the melodies of Irish music, the project takes the listener on a journey of musical fluidity. Photo: Danny Diamant.

Damien McGeehan slides between and mixes several genres on his second album, Close. At one point, he played a traditional Highland tune before pivoting to Richard Thompson’s “Strange Affair”. Follows a jazz number influenced by the streets of New Orleans. It’s an undeniably eclectic album that gains in energy as it progresses.

Beginning with ‘An Chéad Chatlann’, the listener is immediately immersed in a tense soundscape of bluesy guitar, jazz accompaniment and traditional melodies. McGeehan’s violin playing is fluid as he bridges the gap between each genre with his superb instrumentation. The track rises in intensity before an upbeat rhythm guitar is introduced. He develops the piece with drums steeped in rock under the beautiful reel played on violin and flute. The track continues to grow as it incorporates more jazz percussion into the mix and we move onto the second reel before the sudden, dramatic conclusion.

“Dúlamán na Binne Búidhe” follows, and McGeehan is joined by his sister Michelle on violin and rockabilly guitarist Darrel Higham. McGeehan shows off fantastic bowwork as he confidently delivers every crystal-clear note before plucking the pizzicato strings to show off his musical skillful hand. This piece blossoms on the rhythmic rhythm of percussions. Higham gives the song a certain edge with its rumbling chords and attitude loaded solo in the middle of the room.

The world music maestro gives his take on Richard Thompson’s “Strange Affair” with Shauna Mullin providing perfect vocals. Mullin’s performance is brilliant and she almost fools the listener into believing it is his song. Her gorgeous voice is enhanced by the use of her undiluted Irish accent which gives the song an authentic folk feel. It injects more meaning into the already emotional melody. McGeehan shows here his experience as a session musician, as Mullin’s voice is the center of attention as the music accompanies his singing instead of taking over.

‘Runnin’ on Bourbon ‘was inspired by McGeehan’s time on Bourbon Street in New Orleans, reveling in the sounds and atmosphere of the birthplace of jazz. The dynamism of this setting is perfectly captured here. Samba-style percussion under the sparse jazz trumpet depicts a busy, bustling street as McGeehan uses his energetic violin playing to paint himself center stage. The contrast between traditional violin and jazz influences is not only most evident on this track, it is also a shining example of how instruments are connected.

On ‘The Girl & The Lass’, the track opens with a childish lullaby before transforming into an ambulatory slip-jig played by McGeehan on the octave fiddle. The musician’s instrumentation is here in the foreground. It effortlessly winds through the melody adding sparkling embellishments like notes of grace and trills as it goes. The texture of the piece is enriched as a double bass and a violin come to develop it.

“Errity’s Jigs” is a collection of melodies composed by McGeehan in honor of his uncle, John Errity. McGeehan cuts his loose bow hand on three jigs; ‘Worskey’s’, ‘The Flying Lure’ and ‘Errity’s Jig.’ Of all the traditional soundscapes on the album, this facet is the most traditional. With fantastic tone and notation, the performer flies around the neck of the violin to allow melodies created by himself to flourish.

Tom Waits ‘The Briar And The Rose’ from his 1993 album The black rider helps the album relax with Shauna Mullin providing softer, warmer vocals. Mullin’s smooth delivery is a far cry from the hoarse, growling voice of the great Tom Waits. The smooth but powerful performance perfectly accentuates the music beneath it. Rising strings and a finger plucked guitar undermine the melancholy melody as McGeehan once again demonstrates his fantastic ability to organize the accompaniment of a singer.

Close combines McGeehan’s background as a session musician with his time as a third of Donegal’s “Fidil” fiddling trio and his experiences as a touring artist. This makes it a diverse, cinematic and elegant record. Traditional mergers aren’t new, but few can seamlessly blend so many different genres at once while each remains distinct like McGeehan does on this record. This is what makes Kin such a unique and compelling record.

Listen to: “Runnin” on Bourbon. “

Flux Close below.


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COLUMN: Tribute to a beloved volunteer shows the art of generosity https://medfordjazz.org/column-tribute-to-a-beloved-volunteer-shows-the-art-of-generosity/ https://medfordjazz.org/column-tribute-to-a-beloved-volunteer-shows-the-art-of-generosity/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 22:15:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/column-tribute-to-a-beloved-volunteer-shows-the-art-of-generosity/ During the pandemic it was like arts and culture were stuck and now it’s bubbling on the surface, says arts and entertainment columnist Lots of snatches and bobs and a lot of planning ahead in our cultural world these days which is so wonderful to see. It’s like everything is blocked and now everything is […]]]>

During the pandemic it was like arts and culture were stuck and now it’s bubbling on the surface, says arts and entertainment columnist

Lots of snatches and bobs and a lot of planning ahead in our cultural world these days which is so wonderful to see. It’s like everything is blocked and now everything is bubbling on the surface.

First of all, I want to remind everyone that the deadline for nominations for the Orillia Regional Arts and Heritage Awards is Monday October 18th. There are five award categories including Emerging Artist, Heritage, Education, Event, and the Qennefer Browne Achievement Award. for someone who is a true champion of the arts or of heritage in our region.

The nomination process is completely online and easy to do. Please take the time to nominate someone today; it is a real honor and it will mean a lot. You can find out more and name someone here.

Second, something really special happened recently that was a bit under the radar. Local artist Paul Baxter painted a painting at the Rendezvous on the Patio event this summer.

He painted Chris Bellchambers, a beloved volunteer and friend of many, who tragically died this summer in an accident. Baxter painted this lifelike, live portrait on the back of the Orillia Downtown Management Board truck… on which is a mural that Baxter also painted.

Baxter wanted the painting to have meaning and wanted to help the Bellchambers family. So, with the help of the Chamber of Commerce events coordinator, Doug Bunker, Artech and Hartley Haus here in Orillia, t-shirts were made and sold with the image of Baxter. by Chris Bellchambers on the front.

A presentation of the sales funds, t-shirts, flowers and the original portrait was made to Chris Bellchambers mother Sharon last week by Bunker and Baxter. It was an emotional moment, beautifully captured by local photographer Deb Halbot. These are the moments and the people that make Orillia such a wonderful place to live. Thanks for donating, Chris.

Now for a lot of bits and bobs:

This weekend is the Orillia Jazz Festival weekend! And thanks to the lifting of capacity restrictions on government of Ontario theaters and concert halls, a few additional tickets are available for certain events, including Oscar Peterson The Jazz Legend and The Man I Knew by Lance Anderson. Check out all the shows here or get your tickets here.

This Friday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., the Cloud Gallery, located in the Creative Nomad Studios, is organizing a private viewing for a personal exhibition of the work of artist Miriam Slan. You must take a free ticket to attend, and you can grab one here.

This Saturday, artist Murray Van Halem is leading a cityscape painting workshop at Creative Nomad Studios, click here for full details and to register.

On Saturday October 23, the Mariposa Folk Festival is organizing five satellite concerts across Orillia, to give us a taste of Mariposa after two sad summers without Mariposa. There are afternoon shows at St. Paul’s, Braestone Farm, ODAS Park, the Best Western and the Orillia Opera House, featuring many Mariposa favorites including The Doozies, Danny Michel, Coco Love Alcorn, Suzie Vinnick and many more. For full details and to purchase tickets, click here.

October 23 is also the first concert of the Orillia Concert Association season 2021/22, and it’s virtual! Sinfonia Toronto, an incredible 16 piece string instrument ensemble, will impress you with its artistry and precision in this special show.

When you buy tickets for the Orillia Concert Association, you are purchasing them for the entire series, which also includes a virtual performance by clarinet virtuoso Peter Stoll on November 28 and in-person performances with Sonic Escape, the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry. and the Toronto All-Star Big Band, all in 2022. For more information and to purchase a subscription, click here.

The Orillia District Arts Council (ODAC) has been busy during Culture Days, which this year runs from September 24 to October 24. There have been several in-person and virtual events already, and you can find the virtual ones, including a tour of the Streets Alive hippie vans, on the site here.

ODAC will close Culture Days with a FREE concert with the Ronnie Douglas Blues Band at St. James’s Anglican Church on October 23 at 8:00 p.m. and tickets can be purchased here.

And finally, on October 30, Jacquie Dancyger Arnold and Hugh Coleman, along with special guests Laura Aylan-Parker, Ross Arnold and Gail Spencer, are hosting a fundraising concert for the Orillia Museum of Art and History. , aptly titled, Music for the Museum. There are two shows at the St. Paul Center, at 2 pm and 7:30 pm Tickets are $ 25 each and can be purchased at the museum in person or picked up here.

There are many more to come in November, but we’ll save that for a future column! Enjoy the Jazz Fest weekend!

If you have any arts news, send it to annaproctor111@gmail.com by noon Tuesday to be included.


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The three musical elements that make up the iconic James Bond sound https://medfordjazz.org/the-three-musical-elements-that-make-up-the-iconic-james-bond-sound/ https://medfordjazz.org/the-three-musical-elements-that-make-up-the-iconic-james-bond-sound/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 15:06:33 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-three-musical-elements-that-make-up-the-iconic-james-bond-sound/ We dissected every James Bond song to find out what musical elements tie the franchise together and see how Billie Eilish’s “No Time to Die” fits into the canon. We’ve broken down Bond’s sound into three key ingredients: the instrumentation, the suspenseful motif, and the use of unusual minor-major chords. To help us understand what […]]]>
  • We dissected every James Bond song to find out what musical elements tie the franchise together and see how Billie Eilish’s “No Time to Die” fits into the canon.
  • We’ve broken down Bond’s sound into three key ingredients: the instrumentation, the suspenseful motif, and the use of unusual minor-major chords.
  • To help us understand what makes a Bond song a success or a failure, we spoke to Jon Burlingame, film music historian and author of “The Music of James Bond”.

Narrator: When I think of James Bond, I hear something like this.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

It was Bond’s very first theme, starting in 1962. And at first it might seem quite different from this one …

Fallen for a lie ♪

Billie Eilish song for the 2021 movie “No Time to Die”. These songs fall over 50 years apart, so obviously they have different styles. Yet there is also something Bond-y sounding in both, which made me wonder: what is it that unites these songs from totally different eras and gives them that unmistakable Bond sound? I decided to go through all of the Bond themes from the start of the franchise to determine if there is a musical code that connects the best of them and see how Billie’s song stacks up against the rest.

Watch me cry ♪

There is simply no time to die ♪

To help me distinguish over five decades of Bond themes, I enlisted the help of Jon Burlingame, film music historian and author of “The Music of James Bond”. After listening to the songs over and over, I found three key ingredients that seem to define the sound of Bond. I then broke down each theme one by one to find out how many of those elements they were using and if that could separate the hits from the failures.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

The first element that stood out for me in Bond songs was the instruments. And you can trace the beginnings of Bond’s instrumental style to this 1962 “James Bond Theme” released for Bond’s first film, “Dr. No”.

Sean Connery: Bind. James Bond.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

Narrator: A few things stand out here. First off you have the deep, nasal 60s guitar.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

This drippy surf guitar is truly a sound of its day, so it’s more closely associated with the Sean Connery era. But I also noticed riffs on it in a number of subsequent Bond themes.

♪ You only live twice ♪

Until the day

To want too much

The next instruments you hear in “The James Bond Theme” have stuck throughout the franchise.

Jon Burlingame: Da, da, da-da ♪

Da da da ♪

The mid-section of the bebop has in fact become, in recent years, more of a Bond theme in film scores than the [mimics surf guitar] guitar riff.

Narrator: All of those screaming trumpets and horns are part of the big band jazz sound created by John Barry, the composer who arranged this original Bond theme and went on to compose 11 of the first 15 films. From the third film, he had started to associate all these brass instruments with large arrangements of strings, flutes and harps.

Jon: So it was Barry who started the whole Bond sound with this kind of dangerous mix. Part jazz, part rock, part orchestral.

Narrator: This would become the instrumental model of Bond’s music. And it’s clear from the first seconds of Shirley Bassey’s theme for the third film, “Goldfinger” from 1964.

[“Goldfinger”]

Here you have loud horns …

[“Goldfinger”]

compensated by violins …

[“Goldfinger”]

and later in the song, the harps.

[“Goldfinger”]

The intro to “Goldfinger” is so iconic that Gladys Knight arranged her song decades later for the 1989 film “License to Kill”.

[“Licence to Kill”]

I need, I need, I have to hold on to your love ♪

And listening to the instruments of all the other Bond themes, I found that everyone was at least referring to that big brass and full orchestral style defined in “Goldfinger”. Even in songs that seem to break from the format, you can hear clear nods to John Barry’s classic instrumental style. Take Madonna’s theme for “Die Another Day”.

♪ I guess I’ll die another day ♪

It sounds super electronic, but she actually recorded it with a 60-string orchestra, and you can hear those chopped strings in the song.

[strings playing]

More recently, the duo of Jack White and Alicia Keys for “Quantum of Solace” has these big brass and orchestral sections …

[strings playing]

even if they somehow get lost in the mix.

[“Another Way to Die”]

So this big band-string combo is definitely a Bond sound staple. But obviously instruments alone aren’t enough to distinguish Bond songs from your typical chart hit. I have found that it is the chords played by these instruments that give Bond’s music its spy feel, and in particular these four chords here.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

This rising and falling line is sometimes referred to as the motif of suspense. It gets this name because it’s such an essential part of the suspenseful sound in Bond films. This four-step progression first appeared in the 1962 theme and has been recycled into every film’s score since then.

So how many actual theme songs incorporate this motif of suspense? I counted 15. In some of them, the pattern is more obvious.

[“Skyfall”]

At the skyfall ♪

But in others, you really have to listen to it. I liked the way Sheryl Crow hid the motif at the end of her chorus for “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

See it in your eyes ♪

Tomorrow never dies ♪

The third and final element I followed first appeared at the very end of this original “James Bond theme”.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

If this sounding chord sounds a bit mysterious, it’s probably because it’s not your standard three-note chord. It’s a minor chord with two major intervals, a seventh and a ninth, added – a combination of tones that we’re not used to hearing in popular music. To compare, here is a straight E minor. And now here is this chord from “The James Bond Theme”. This special chord also appears as the gunshot chord in many gun barrel sequences in the movies.

[“The James Bond Theme”]

And this is just the most famous example of the types of complex chords found in Bond’s music. Instead of sticking to just two chord flavors, major or minor, Bond songs tend to use all of those minor chords with major intervals stacked on top. This creates more ambiguous and less predictable harmonies for our ears – the kind of harmonies perfect for spy music. This last chord in “The James Bond Theme” in particular is so closely associated with the movies that it is often referred to as the “Bond chord”. So, naturally, I had to include it in my column. I have found that 13, or about half, of the theme songs recreate the effect of the Bond chord in some way, usually by opening or closing on a dissonant chord similar to the chord. original.

[“Goldfinger”]

Or, in the case of “Skyfall”, both opening and closing on such a cord.

[“Skyfall”]

OK, so we have the brass and the stringed instruments, this suspenseful motif and the jarring Bond string. You could call these three musical touchstones of the franchise. Some of the most iconic themes use all three. This includes, of course, the original “James Bond Theme” and “Goldfinger,” the two songs that served as musical plans for the rest of the series. Other themes managed to get away with just two of these characteristics while still retaining the Bond sound.

♪ GoldenEye, I found his weakness ♪

And six of the themes only worked in one element of Bond, the instrumentation, leaving out those other two characteristics. The first of these outliers was Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does It Better” for the 1977 film “The Spy Who Loved Me”.

Nobody does better

It’s a perfect ’70s ballad, but does that sound Bond-y? Not really. It was a huge success, however, which might explain why we saw it followed by a streak of Bond songs that deviate from the formula, and with less success. 1979’s “Moonraker” is often described as Shirley Bassey’s weakest Bond song.

♪ Just like the moonraker goes ♪

Sheena Easton’s “For Your Eyes Only” is a rock ballad that never quite turns into a Bond theme.

I never felt

Until I look at you

And Rita Coolidge’s “All Time High” for “Octopussy” sounds more like 80s soft rock than classic Bond.

♪ We are a record

After this series of rather forgettable songs, most of the themes tried to incorporate several Bond tropes. You get a few exceptions in Madonna’s “Die Another Day” and Sam Smith’s “Writing’s on the Wall” for “Specter,” each of which is really just a nod to Bond’s instrumental style.

[“Writing’s on the Wall”]

And the two were quite controversial as Bond themes, perhaps because they seem to reflect the artist’s sound more than the franchise’s.

Based on this analysis, it looks like there is a winning formula for Bond songs after all. So let’s take a look at Billie’s “No Time to Die” and see how it fits, starting with the instrumentation. “No Time to Die” begins with a repeating series of piano key tinkles …

[“No Time to Die”]

similar to the figure repeated at the beginning of “Diamonds Are Forever” played by an electronic organ.

[“Diamonds Are Forever”]

Then, as we head into the chorus, we get a little hint of the twangy surf guitar from the original theme.

♪ That I fell for a lie ♪

After the chorus, we finally hear the orchestra of 70 people, arranged by the film composer Hans Zimmer.

[orchestra playing]

Jon: You’ll hear the kind of sassy brass that Barry incorporated into his 1960s Bond scores. And then, of course, the kind of rich stringy sound that delicately weaves its way into Eilish’s song.

Narrator: Now it’s like a more subdued version of a classic Bond orchestration.

So the instruments, check. Now what about this suspenseful ground? If you listen carefully, there is a light riff just before Billie starts to sing. And other subtle versions dot the song.

The main chord progression also matches that of three other thematic songs from the Daniel Craig era. All play on the chord movements of the original motif.

[“No Time to Die”]

[“Skyfall”]

But “No Time to Die” is even more a return to the original theme. It’s in exactly the same key, E minor, and, surprise, the very last chord of Billie’s song … is exactly the same which closes the original theme.

So Billie reaches the three signifiers of the sound Bond. But notice how she leaves the Bond Cord mark until the very end of the song, the same way she does those silent synth plays on the suspense motif and takes a long time to build from her sparse instrumental. usual in the full orchestra. This is really Billie’s take on Bond. It’s discreet and hushed, and it works.

After going through nearly 60 years of Bond themes, one point to remember is that these songs are meant to define eras. And in the most successful, the artists weave in Bond’s musical traditions while leaving their own imprint on the franchise. Billie did just that. The James Bond themes are a cultural institution at this point, and “No Time to Die” has all the DNA of a great.


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Group ABC directors program to return to Ashland in 2022 – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://medfordjazz.org/group-abc-directors-program-to-return-to-ashland-in-2022-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ https://medfordjazz.org/group-abc-directors-program-to-return-to-ashland-in-2022-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 00:21:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/group-abc-directors-program-to-return-to-ashland-in-2022-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Clarinetist Julian Bliss will headlining when ABC Group performs next summer in Ashland, after a two-year pandemic detour. ABC photo Irish violinist and Riverdance star Haley Richardson will be a special guest artist in a return engagement with ABC in 2023. She was 13 when she first performed here in 2016. Courtesy photo Jazz trombonist […]]]>

Clarinetist Julian Bliss will headlining when ABC Group performs next summer in Ashland, after a two-year pandemic detour. ABC photo

Irish violinist and Riverdance star Haley Richardson will be a special guest artist in a return engagement with ABC in 2023. She was 13 when she first performed here in 2016. Courtesy photo

Jazz trombonist and former Dukes of Dixieland performer Harry Watters will be a guest artist at next summer’s ABC group concert. ABC Photo

American Band College will return to Ashland in 2022 for its annual 18-day summer clinic for group directors after a pandemic detour forced them online in 2020 and Puget Sound in 2021.

Summer clinics, each with two public concerts, are part of ABC’s master’s program.

Up to 200 people over the past few years, summer workshop attendees will perform at two venues in 2022 – a June 26 performance at the Craterian Theater and the traditional July 4 concert at Ashland High School Stadium with bonfires fireworks as a result. The group is also planning to participate in the July 4th Ashland Parade.

The program, founded by Max McKee of Ashland, recruits students from around the world for its three-year masters program. McKee is the executive director of the organization and his son Scott is the CEO.

Max McKee and his wife, Nell, recently returned from a five-week tour of Europe, including visits to Greece, London and Ireland.

During their stay in Greece, they registered with two ABC graduates (2003 and 2006) in Thessaloniki – Yiannis Kouokas and Nikos Chrysouhoou.

“They’re amazing,” McKee said. “Between them, they have more than 150 musicians in their two harmony orchestras. I have seen up close all the great things these two men have done for group music in Greece.

McKee said they are the go-to directors in Greece when it comes to group music and group festivals. They will be returning to Ashland next summer to conduct the July 4th concert.

The guest artists at the concert will be Julian Bliss on clarinet and Harry Watters on trombone. The two appeared with the ABC group during their Craterian concert in 2019.

Bliss, concert soloist and jazz artist, has recently performed with the Sao Paolo Symphony, the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, the Paris Chamber Orchestra, the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra and the London Philharmonic. In 2012, he founded the Julian Bliss Septet, creating programs inspired by the great jazzman Benny Goodman.

Watters toured with the Dukes of Dixieland for four years and was in demand as a Bourbon Street musician during his graduate studies at the University of New Orleans, as a graduate assistant to Professor Ellis Marsalis. Today he performs internationally and has recorded a lot.

Guest composers will be Randall Standridge and Julie Giroux.

Standridge is a Marching Band Editor for Grand Mesa Music Publishers. He is sought after as a clinician, exercise designer and musical arranger. A resident of Jonesboro, Arkansas, he is also a freelance artist, photographer and writer.

Giroux, whose first published work for harmony orchestra was composed at the age of 13, now has over 100 credits for film, television and video games. She has collaborated with Martin Scorsese, Madonna, Celene Dion, Clint Eastwood, Michael Jackson, Harry Connick Jr. and many more. Nominated for Emmy Awards, Oscars and Golden Globes, she won three Emmy Awards.

On their recent trip to London, the McKees attended two performances of Riverdance celebrating 25 years. Riverdance fiddler Haley Richardson performed on an Irish-themed show with ABC in 2016 when she was 13.

“She’s one of the best fiddlers of all time,” McKee said. “Riverdance songwriter Bill Whelan created a five-minute segment in the production, featuring Haley solo on stage.”

The McKees took her out to dinner after one of the performances to finalize the details of her 2023 comeback appearance on ABC.

ABC recently completed the purchase of a building in Ashland at the corner of Siskiyou Boulevard and Liberty, originally the Hillside Church.

The 6,000-square-foot structure will be remodeled to create high-density storage space for ABC’s music collection (now housed at Lincoln School), as well as a study area, rehearsal space and location. for musical preparation. The lower floor will be used to store equipment.

“We had architectural designs created for a new building to be placed on the Ashland School District property,” McKee said. “But the price of $ 1.3 million has increased to $ 3.2 million.” Rather than jeopardizing ABC’s endowment, they shifted gears.

“There is a small house on the property that we are going to rent out to help pay the bills,” he said.

A second house, donated by patron and supporter Gladys Wright, will be sold by ABC, cutting the cost of purchasing the church in half.

“Gladys and her husband, Al, have been mainstays of group music for 80 years,” McKee said. Al Wright died last year at the age of 104 and Gladys Wright is 96.

ABC is making arrangements with the Ashland School District to use the high school facilities as a rehearsal space, as in previous years.

Enrollers in the program learn from some of the country’s top technicians and clinicians during the three summer programs. About half of the three-year diploma work is done at home, between summers.

Applicants must complete six projects, two each year. They include work based on a five-hour entrance exam, audio and video recordings, and an in-depth final project covering their 20 favorite clinic sessions (out of over 150) and 30 favorite group tracks (out of over 150). nearly 400).

A one-day final exam for third-year registrants on July 5 completes the program each summer. It’s complete, to say the least. It includes a written exam; give introductory lessons to the clarinet, horn and snare drum to students who have never played instruments; and a diagnostic rehearsal as a band performs what McKee calls the BooBoo Concert.

“Each candidate leads one of four groups of 35 musicians of non-graduate masters candidates who have 25 specific mistakes to make,” he said. “The candidate has 12 minutes to find as many of these errors as possible.”

McKee has been passionate about orchestral music for decades. He was a group director at SOU before founding the ABC Masters program in 1989.

ABC was first affiliated with SOU, then Sam Houston State University, and now Central Washington University in Ellensburg.

“It’s amazing to me to see the continued interest from so many of our 1,200 graduates,” McKee said. “To this day, we are still in contact with all but 75 of the group of 1,200.”

Contact Ashland writer Jim Flint at jimflint.ashland@yahoo.com.


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Highlighting one of the best singers in the East. – The Waltonian https://medfordjazz.org/highlighting-one-of-the-best-singers-in-the-east-the-waltonian/ https://medfordjazz.org/highlighting-one-of-the-best-singers-in-the-east-the-waltonian/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 02:21:42 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/highlighting-one-of-the-best-singers-in-the-east-the-waltonian/ Christine Carey, a contemporary music major at Eastern, has spent the last few months preparing for her next senior recital. Carey has been performing for as long as she can remember, and although she grew up playing multiple instruments, Carey’s musical outlet is her voice. Although Carey’s primary form of musical expression is through her […]]]>

Christine Carey, a contemporary music major at Eastern, has spent the last few months preparing for her next senior recital.

Carey has been performing for as long as she can remember, and although she grew up playing multiple instruments, Carey’s musical outlet is her voice.

Although Carey’s primary form of musical expression is through her voice, she also finds it difficult; “When emotions are a thing, sometimes singing just isn’t really possible,” said Carey. When the emotions get overwhelming, Carey turns to his guitar or piano, or even writes his own music.

Beyond vocals, Carey has been playing guitar and piano since she was very young, and has recently started playing the violin.

Carey enjoys immersing herself in music that matches her vocal tone. She specializes in singing blues, jazz, and folk music, which also affects the way she writes music. Although she tends to be influenced by the music she listens to, she tends to sing where her voice is strongest.

Carey has been working on setting up her senior recital since July, when she asked her jury to select her song arrangements for the recital. The recital will feature jazz, contemporary folk music, musical theater songs and some of Carey’s original songs.

A jury for musical majors can be considered as an intermediate point in a final thesis; “It requires a weekly rehearsal with a team of collaborators, a lot of research into the songs, understanding the lyrics, where they’re coming from, and knowing the story so I can tell it better,” said Carey.

There are a lot of things Carey had to take into consideration when planning her senior recital. Everything had to fit in a certain amount of time, she had to find a suitable accompanist for each piece and she had to make sure that all of her songs matched the theme of her major in contemporary music.

Carey is also an active member of musical ensembles; Tournant, university choir and Eastern Winds.

Beyond music, Carey plays an active role in several campus clubs. Along with her musical endeavors, Carey is a third year student chaplain at Gough Hall. She is also the musical coordinator of the Ethels swing club.

All around, Carey has always been an artist’s soul, in her spare time she likes to dance and draw when she has the time to do so.

“I like to read but I don’t have a lot of time for that, training takes a lot, if you really want to get good you have to spend a lot of time training,” said Carey.

Practice is important for any musician to master their art. However, “you can’t practice vocals too much, not safe, even just listening / viewing songs, other instruments can spend hours practicing songs,” advises Carey.

Carey’s advice to anyone looking for a career in music is to “keep trying, no matter how bad it seems or like you’re not going anywhere.” Practice takes time, you can’t rush things, take it slow and fight your way. It’s not an easy art, it’s a difficult discipline, you just have to keep pushing.

Carey’s senior recital will be held on October 15 at St. David’s Episcopal Church at 7:00 p.m.


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TZ @ 60: The rich history of music and entertainment in Tanzania https://medfordjazz.org/tz-60-the-rich-history-of-music-and-entertainment-in-tanzania/ https://medfordjazz.org/tz-60-the-rich-history-of-music-and-entertainment-in-tanzania/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:07:09 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/tz-60-the-rich-history-of-music-and-entertainment-in-tanzania/ By MAJUTO OMARY Dar es Salaam. The new generation music “Bongo Flavor” has now gained popularity and earns artists millions of shillings compared to their past counterparts. Before the country’s independence, group music and orchestra dominated the entertainment industry over other forms of entertainment like taarab, nightclubs, cultural dances, and cinemas. History shows that dance […]]]>

By MAJUTO OMARY

Dar es Salaam. The new generation music “Bongo Flavor” has now gained popularity and earns artists millions of shillings compared to their past counterparts.

Before the country’s independence, group music and orchestra dominated the entertainment industry over other forms of entertainment like taarab, nightclubs, cultural dances, and cinemas.

History shows that dance music began in the 1930s in Dar es Salaam, where most bands come from, and is still popular in Tanzania, although young people are more likely to listen to music. bongo flava or other forms of pop music.

Bands like Nuta (at the time), Western Jazz, Mlimani Park (later known as DDC Mlimani Park), Dar es Salaam International, Kilwa Jazz, International Orchestra Safari Sound, Maquis du Zaire (later Maquis Original ) and the Makasy group were well known by people of different age groups.

Other notable groups were Super Matimila and Vijana Jazz, Morogoro Jazz, Cuban Malimba, Tabora Jazz, Kimulimuli, WashirikaTanzania Stars, Bantu Group, Polisi Jazz and many more.

Besides entertaining, the groups, through their songs, were educational and promoted modern agriculture, health and other things in society.

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After Tanzania’s independence in 1961, a sponsorship system was introduced by the government of the late Julius Nyerere, whereby groups would be supported financially by government departments or other national institutions.

One of the main groups of the time was the Nuta Jazz Band, now known as Msondo Ngoma.

At the same time, the bands are gradually managed as companies owning instruments, and musicians considered as employees, who receive salaries.

NUTA Jazz Band was one of the first groups to adopt this model.

Group music dominated the market while taarab followed suit. There were famous taarab groups like Cultural Music Band founded in 1958 with famous song like Wahoi.

There was also a famous taarab group like the Egyptians and famous musicians like Siti Binti Saad, Bi Kidude to name a few.

Basically, entertainment revelers had to choose either group music or taarab for recreation, despite the fact that there were also nightclubs that were normally considered for young people.

The entertainment industry continued to grow, and many government and private institutions formed their own groups to create more jobs.

Musicians like Mbaraka Mwinshehe, Marijani Rajab, Omari Kungu Baya, Ahmed Kipande and others laid the foundation for dance music in the country.

A famous band, Bima Lee, was created by the National Insurance Corporation and whose famous musicians were then known.

Bima Lee musician Jerry Nashon aka Dudumizi was well known in the late 70s and 80s with his famous Mesenja number.

There were other groups including Tancut who was based in the Iringa region. The group also had twin brothers Kasaroo Kyanga and Kyanga Songa who catapulted the group into popularity with their Safari song Siyo Kifo and many more. There were also other groups including Urafiki Jazz under the direction of the late Juma Mrisho Feruz aka Ngurimba wa Ngurimba and Mwenge Jazz.

The rivalry between one group and another has spiced up the entertainment industry and accelerated the development of the sector.

For example, Orchestra Safari Sound (OSS) with King Kikii then the late Ndala Kasheba were rivals with Orchestra Maquis du Zaire under the late Tshinyama Chianza; Juwata Jazz (Msondo Ngoma) was against DDC Mlimani Park. Groups have spiced up the development of music and created jobs.

Group music revolutions

In the 1980s, there was a famous band The Kilimanjaro aka Wana Njenje who did a tremendous job of promoting the country’s music abroad.

The band was previously known as The Love Bugs, then known as Revolutions and moved to Dar es Salaam, where there was stiff competition from older bands. The group has started performing in the best hotels and tourist centers in Arusha and Dar es Salaam.

In 1989 the group toured London and changed their name to the current name. The group released their debut album known as Kata Kata, in which their song known as Njenje became their nickname “Wananjenje”.

In London, the Kilimanjaro Band has performed with great African artists like Baaba Maal and Sam Mangwana.

The group toured Japan in 1992 and 1994 to become the first group to perform in famous hotels.

In 1997, The Kilimanjaro Band released their second album ‘Maua’. With Nyota Waziri’s female vocals now adding more flavor to the album, the album continued to sell despite rampant piracy still plaguing the music industry in Tanzania. However, in 1999 the group spent time performing at various hotels in Tanzania, Muscat and Bahrain to win the hearts of many revelers. In 2000, the band released their best-selling album to date, “Kinyaunyau”. The song contains works of art with influences from different ethnic groups in Tanzania. It was followed in 2005 by ‘Gere’. The Kilimanjaro Band has won several awards, including the 2000 Best Band M Net Award and the 2001 Kibo Gold Best Band Award.

The group is well known for its mduara (circle) dance style, which is very common to many ethnic groups in Tanzania and Africa. A UK tour in July and August 2004 proved that the band also had many fans outside of Tanzania.

Besides Njenje, the Super Matimila Orchestra conducted by Ramadhan Mtoro Ongala (DR Remmy) performed at the Womad (World of Music and Dance) festival in Reading, England, in 1988.

The late Ongala started making studio albums in England with Real World, which released “Songs for the Poor Man” in 1989 and “Mambo” in 1992, both albums contained songs in English as well as Swahili.

During the 1990s, Ongala and his band toured Africa, Europe and the United States.

Later, Twanga Pepeta toured the Scandinavian countries in 2005 and released a special album known as Safari. The group also participated in the Muscat Sultanate Music Festival in the mid-2000s.

New generation music

In the 1990s, there was the existence of young musicians who participated in various music concerts in Dar es Salaam. A group like Four Crewz Flavor was famous then.

Famous places were Empire Cinema, Korean Cultural Center, and Starlight Hotel in the city center.

There were other bands like Kwanza Unit which had famous musicians including Fresh G, Dar Young Mob, Untouchable. In addition, solo artists like Saleh Jabir played their part.

The musicians took part in a famous music concert known as Yo Rap Bonanza, which was normally reserved for hip hop musicians.

Since then, the music has grown in popularity and has inspired many young artists to get involved. Some groups formed after the Yo Rap concert including Weusi Wagumu Asilia (WWA) and Hard Blasters of which the famous musician, Professor J was one of their members.

Others were Diplomatz, Gangwe Mob, Mabaga Fresh, Fun with Sense, Manzese side connection (Manzese crew) and others. The music grew and caused other groups like TMK to form under Juma Kassim aka Nature to change the direction of dance music.

It is a fact that the musicians of Bongo Fleva countered criticism from music lovers and were called thugs because of their dress.

There were some fleva bongo performers who didn’t reach their goals and jumped while others stood firm to develop their careers and then started to beat band music.

Musician Judith Wambura also gained popularity with her group Machozi after recruiting various musicians like Jonico Flowers and others.

Also on the list were Banana Zorro, Bob Ludala and others.

Many music lovers may still remember Bongo Fleva Nice artist Lucas Mkenda aka Mr Nice, who played a role in promoting Bongo Fleva music at home and abroad.

His songs like Kikulacho aka Kuku Kapanda Baiskeli, Kidali Po, Fadilia were loved by my people from different age groups.

Mr. Nice was the icon of Tanzania during his prime time.


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AHA! Night in New Bedford, Thursday October 14, presents Art in Tune https://medfordjazz.org/aha-night-in-new-bedford-thursday-october-14-presents-art-in-tune/ https://medfordjazz.org/aha-night-in-new-bedford-thursday-october-14-presents-art-in-tune/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:31:50 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/aha-night-in-new-bedford-thursday-october-14-presents-art-in-tune/ New Bedford, Massachusetts – For over 20 years AHA! produced FREE monthly events in downtown New Bedford, each featuring a different theme to showcase the range of creativity that abounds in this seaside town. October 14e is a tribute to New Bedford’s musical flair. The talented artists and multicultural creative expression of New Bedford’s arts […]]]>

New Bedford, Massachusetts – For over 20 years AHA! produced FREE monthly events in downtown New Bedford, each featuring a different theme to showcase the range of creativity that abounds in this seaside town. October 14e is a tribute to New Bedford’s musical flair. The talented artists and multicultural creative expression of New Bedford’s arts and culture scene enrich the cultural life of the entire South Coast. The The artistic and cultural celebrations on 2nd Thursday offer artists, community organizers, educational institutions, museums, places of worship and small businesses a monthly platform to share their work and dialogue with a regional audience.

Live shows!

First Unitarian Church, 71 Eighth Street, Stage Artistry Studios, performances at 6:15 p.m. and 6:45 p.m.

Best of Broadway – Halloween Edition. A live musical tour of Broadway songs with a Halloween performed by talented young theater students who will dazzle you with their voices and knowledge of Broadway shows.

New Bedford Symphony performs live, 7.15pm Timothy Macri, flute and Joseph Bentley, bass.

New Bedford Whaling Museum, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Outdoor event at the Whaling Museum Plaza. Masks required 18 Johnnycake Hill

Night of the Azores! New Bedford is home to a vibrant Azorean community. Celebrate part of its music, folklore and maritime traditions during the night of the Azores.

New Bedford Art Museum, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

608 Pleasant Street

AHA! Mini concert: Accomplished South Coast musicians at businesses and institutions in downtown New Bedford for a short concert during AHA! Night. Previous performers have covered folk, indie, jazz, hip-hop, and rock.

Exhibition: Uncommon Threads: The Works of Ruth E. Carter

A solo exhibition celebrating the 30-year career of Massachusetts-native Ruth E. Carter as an Oscar-winning costume designer.

Exhibition: Eadweard Muybridge: Animal Locomotion

Eadweard Muybridge: Animal Locomotion is the library’s latest exhibit featuring historical photographic studies of moving animals and early film screenings.

Alison Wells Gallery, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

106 purchase street

Catch the island vibes with live steel pan music from El Caribe to celebrate the Alison Wells Gallery’s 7th anniversary!

Local art! New giclées and note cards from Alison’s “In the Neighborhood” series on New Bedford (currently on display at the New Bedford Whaling Museum). In addition, original works of art by selected guest artists in stained glass, woodwork, ceramics and macrame.

Rotch-Jones-Duff Garden, 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. in the garden

396 County Street

Cool Banana Wig performs at 6 p.m.

Get the kids playing homemade or unusual instruments and JAM with the band!

Grand parade of pumpkins

Visit the premises to see an exhibit of Jack-O-Lanterns, carefully carved by members of the community. Inside the mansion, children can participate in a treasure hunt with prizes.

Sessions on rue Center, 5:30 p.m. and 7:15 p.m.

23, rue du Center

Jazz music under the jazz wall

Enjoy a live jazz / r & b performance from Joaqiun Santos (frontman and drums), Dominic Davis (bass), Evan Cole (vocals) and Adonis Martin (keyboards).

Art, history, architecture and events for children!

Campus Star Store, UMass Dartmouth Center for Visual and Creative Arts, 5 p.m. – 9 p.m.

715, rue des Achats

We are: 7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Artist Talk and Contextual Community Engagement Poster Installation and artist talk with visiting designer, activist and visual artist Rick Griffith. Create your own illustration and personal message at the AHA Party on pre-printed poster templates for this collaborative autoethnographic typography project between Rick Griffiths, CVPA students, and the community. Displayed in the windows of Swain Studio (corner of Purchase and Union streets). Details on AHA.org

Room: Amanda Means: Light Years – Vernissage 6 p.m.

The Guggenheim-winning photographer pushes the boundaries of the photographic medium.

Paint and fabrics at The Drawing Room, 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., 36 North Water St.

Farrow & Ball organized by Liberty

These two leading English interior design brands have collaborated on a new edition of complementary paints and fabrics organized in timeless combinations for a new generation of homes. Industry experts will discuss the new collection throughout the evening, leaving plenty of time for your interior design questions.

Gallery X, 2 new exhibitions, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

169 William Street

Urban X-Ploration in the main gallery

An exhibition of works inspired by or representing the urban landscape. Curator invited by photographer Frank Grace.

Art by Pat Kellogg and Michael Hecht in the Douglass Gallery

New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center, 7 p.m. via Zoom (link available at fishingheritage.org)

38 Bethel Street

Highlighting several projects that pay tribute to the important work of women in fishing communities.

Ginok song, artist, recently created a mural depicting women in the fishing community of Petty Harbor, Newfoundland.

Angela Sanfilippo, president of the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association who created a quilt that tells the story of wives activism and helped create a monument dedicated to the role of women in Gloucester’s fishing community.

Swing by the south end, Kilburn Mill, 5 to 8 p.m.

127 Rodney French Boulevard, main entrance, 2sd Ground

Open day – art receptions, art demonstrations and tours of the mill.

Judith Klein Art Gallery – new works, including acrylic and mixed media paintings and prints, as well as hand-printed textiles and new jewelry by Katy Jeffrey. Office 2-87

New Bedford Main Library, 3 p.m.

613 Pleasant Street

Mini pumpkin decoration

Pilgrim United Church of Christ/ Meal of Mercy, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

635 Achat Street,

Arts and Crafts, Booker T Washington Billboards, and Pumpkin Decorations


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