Jazz instruments – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 10:05:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz instruments – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 From Feimster to Mummenschanz, UConn’s Jorgensen Center is preparing a full program for the fall – Hartford Courant https://medfordjazz.org/from-feimster-to-mummenschanz-uconns-jorgensen-center-is-preparing-a-full-program-for-the-fall-hartford-courant/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 10:01:41 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/from-feimster-to-mummenschanz-uconns-jorgensen-center-is-preparing-a-full-program-for-the-fall-hartford-courant/ Just weeks before the start of the fall semester, the Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Connecticut unveiled its full fall season of music, comedy and dance, with one of the attractions – the Swiss masked troupe Mummenschanz – a clever combination of all these things. More than a dozen events, […]]]>

Just weeks before the start of the fall semester, the Jorgensen Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Connecticut unveiled its full fall season of music, comedy and dance, with one of the attractions – the Swiss masked troupe Mummenschanz – a clever combination of all these things.

More than a dozen events, including a classical faculty concert and a show exclusively for the UConn community, fill the schedule between mid-September and early December.

Classical music features prominently, with several acts already well known to Jorgensen’s audience. Some are long-standing traditions, like the Holiday Pops concert and the singing of Handel’s “Messiah” organized by the UConn music department.

Classical/pop combo The Piano Guys make their third visit to Storrs on September 16 at 8 p.m. is his last tour.

Viral sensations The Piano Guys – actually a pianist and a cellist – deliver their new multi-style multimedia concert on September 16 at 8 p.m.

The Emerson String Quartetwhich ends a career spanning nearly 50 years, performs works by Mendelssohn, Brahms and Dvorak on September 30 at 8 p.m.

The singer/violinist duo Rhiannon Giddens (of Carolina Chocolate Drops) and Italian singer-songwriter Francesco Turrissi released two albums, “There Is No Other” and “They’re Calling Me Home”. They play Oct. 8 at 8 p.m.

The Ukrainian Folk Music Quartet Dakha Brakhawho plays instruments such as goblet drum, tabla, didgeridoo, jew’s harp, flute, ukulele, zgaleyka, cello and accordion as well as piano, is at Jorgensen on October 9 at 3 p.m.

Actor Fortune Feimster, known from TV shows “The L-Word Generation Q,” “Kenan,” and “The Mindy Project,” among others, performs Oct. 15 at 8 p.m.

The Apollon Musagète Quartet from Poland, with pianist Garrick Ohlsson, plays works by Schubert and Shostakovich on Oct. 16 at 3 p.m.

The internationally renowned movement/illusion/costume troupe Mummenschanz returns to Jorgensen on his 50th Anniversary Tour, October 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Dance by Garth Faganthe troupe, led by the man who choreographed Broadway’s “The Lion King,” performs Nov. 12 at 8 p.m., followed by a Q&A with the dancers.

There is a UConn School of Fine Arts Faculty Showcase concert Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m. with Sophie Shao on cello and John Blacklow on piano.

jazz singer Samara Joy is at Jorgensen for a cabaret concert on November 18 at 8 p.m.

The directory Holiday Pop Concert conducted by Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra conductor Keith Lockhart is Dec. 3 at 8 p.m.

The Boston Camerata performs the holiday theme “A Medieval Christmas: Hodie Christus Natus Est” on December 6 at 7:30 p.m.

The directory “Messiah sings! of Handel’s masterpiece is December 9 at 8 p.m.

Also, magician/comedian Justin Willman will be performing a special show exclusively for UConn families on October 22 at 8 p.m.

Tickets for most shows go on sale August 29. The first show of the season, The Piano Guys, is already on sale for $65-$75, plus VIP packages of $150 and $200. Tickets for Fortune Feimster are also already on sale, priced at $15-$40.

Christopher Arnott can be reached at carnott@courant.com.

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The 606 Club announces the program for 2022 EFG LJF (11-20 November) – London Jazz News https://medfordjazz.org/the-606-club-announces-the-program-for-2022-efg-ljf-11-20-november-london-jazz-news/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 08:12:39 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-606-club-announces-the-program-for-2022-efg-ljf-11-20-november-london-jazz-news/ The 606 Club has just announced its EFG London Jazz Festival programme. LR: Anita Wardell (tribute to Betty Carter, November 13); Lew Tabackin (rare appearance in London, November 17); Jas Kayser (tribute to “Money Jungle”, November 16) COMPLETE LIST OF THE 12 SHOWS AT CLUB 606 Fri 11 9 p.m. – Imaani and special guest: […]]]>

The 606 Club has just announced its EFG London Jazz Festival programme.

LR: Anita Wardell (tribute to Betty Carter, November 13); Lew Tabackin (rare appearance in London, November 17);
Jas Kayser (tribute to “Money Jungle”, November 16)

COMPLETE LIST OF THE 12 SHOWS AT CLUB 606

Fri 11 9 p.m. – Imaani and special guest: Joy Rose – predominantly vocal soul/groove group £20 – RESERVATIONS

Sat 12 9 p.m. –The Summit of the Sax in Memory of Peter King feat. Mornington Lockett with the Trio Deschanel Gordon & Special Guests – Modern jazz with 4 saxophones £20 – RESERVATIONS

Sun 13 1:30 p.m. – Lunchtime Special: World Heartbeat and the Julian Joseph Academy present “The Next Generation » £12 – RESERVATIONS

8 p.m. – Anita Wardell “Tribute to Betty Carter” – voice-led modern jazz quartet £18 – RESERVATIONS

Mon 14 8 p.m. – Denys Baptiste/Jason Yarde Quintet £18 – RESERVATIONS

Tue 15 8 p.m. – “Night Dreamer” by Phil Robson, tribute to Miles & Wayne Shorter feat. Jean Toussaint – modern jazz on the guitar with Special guest: Jean Toussaint – sax £18 – RESERVATIONS

Wed 16 8 p.m. – Jas Kayser: Tribute to Duke Ellington’s “Money Jungle Trio” – modern jazz feat. Joe Webb – piano; Does Sach – bass & Jas Kayser – drums + Special guest £17 – RESERVATIONS

Game 17 8 p.m. – **Special Club 606** Lew Tabackin – Modern jazz led by American sax £22 – RESERVATIONS

Fri 18 9 p.m. – Samara with special guest: Adriano Adewale – Latin/jazz quintet feat. Caroline Lelis – vcls; Steve Rubie – sax/flute; Andy Lafone – bass; Neil Angilley – pno + Special guest: Adriano Adewale – perc £20 – RESERVATIONS

Sat 19 9 p.m. – Davison/Smith play Basie – Group of 7 mainstream jazz musicians led by trpt/sax £20 – RESERVATIONS

Sun 20 1:30 p.m. – Lunchtime Special: Rachel Sutton, Jo Harrop and Eileen Hunter: ‘Once More’ £15 – RESERVATIONS

8 p.m. – Liana Carroll – vocal/piano led modern jazz feat. Roger Carey – bass; Russell Field – drums £18 – RESERVATIONS

Poster for the LJF series of 606

PROGRAM DETAILS

Friday 11e :
Imaani and special guest Joy Rose Tonight, the 606 Club presents Imani, the more sheSpecial guest: Joy Rose . Both Imaani and Joy are star performers with iconic band Incognito – it promises to be a world-class soul and R&B night!“The beautiful voice of Imaani”DJ Times;[Joy Rose] “ is simply breathtaking”

Smooth Jazz nowSat 12e : The Peter King Memorial Sax Summit feat.
Mornington Lockett with the

Trio Deschanel Gordon and special guests A stunning 4 sax front line withMornington Locket , Karen Sharp, Simon Allen and Graeme Blevins, accompanied by BBC Young Jazz Musician of the Year Deschanel Gordon and his trio. “Lockett…plays with tremendous ease and dynamism” Evening Standard; “Gordon… the pianist to watch”

London jazzSun 13 e lunch:

World Heartbeat and the Julian Joseph Academy present “The Next Generation”

This afternoon’s music features young students from World Heart Beat Music Academy and Julian Joseph Academy presenting their “The Next Generation” program. So if you want to experience the next generation of jazz musicians, this is the concert for you!Sun 13 e evening:

Anita Wardell “Tribute to Betty Carter” Winner of two BBC Jazz Awards and a British Jazz Award for ‘Best Female Jazz Singer’, singer Anita Wardell celebrates the artistry of jazz legend Betty Carter. “…the most creative jazz singer in London” Evening Standard; “a model of the art of the Jazz singer”

GuardianMon 14e :

Denys Baptiste/Jason Yarde Quintet Formed especially for this EFG London Jazz Festival performance, this will be the first appearance of the Denys Baptiste/Jason Yarde Band, two of the UK’s finest jazz saxophonists. A unique and powerful combination. “Baptiste… master saxophonist” Evening Standard; “Yarde…world class”

GuardianTue 15e :

“Night Dreamer” by Phil Robson, tribute to Miles & Wayne Shorter feat. John Toussaint Multi-award winning guitarist/composer Phil Robson and his friends come together to pay tribute to the great saxophonist, composer and living legend, Wayne Shorter. Fittingly, the evening will feature the wonderful tenor saxophone playing of former Art Blakey member and full-fledged frontman Jean Toussaint. “Robson works impeccably”

AllAboutJazzWed 16e :

“Money Jungle Trio” by Jas Kayser 2021 Jazz FM ‘Breakthrough Act of the Year’ drummer/songwriter Jas Kayser (Kansas Smitty’s, Nubya Garcia, Jorja Smith) is joined by fellow Smitty alumni Joe Webb, piano and Will Sach, bass playing music from the 1962 album by Duke Ellington, ‘Jungle of Money’. “…exceptionally talented”

BeBop spoken hereGame 17e :

Lew Tabackin American saxophonist and flutist Lew Tabackin has recorded over 30 albums as a leader and has won numerous Downbeat Critics and Readers polls (including the Critics Poll on Flute). With rare eloquence on both instruments, he is world class.“Tabackin… a master of jazz

” Saxophone DiaryFri 18e :

Samara with special guest Adriano Adewale “Samara” is a jazz/latin group led by the 606 Club’sSteve Rubie . With the Brazilian singerCaroline Lelis their special guest is the Afro-Brazilian percussionist/composer Adrian Adewale(AKA Trio, Bobby McFerrin).“ Crunchy Latin Jazz Quintet » Free time; ‘”Adewale… an invaluable asset”

GuardianSat 19e :

Davison/Smith play Basie This newly formed 7-piece band, led by trumpeter James Davison & with saxophonist Thomas Smith will play music from Count Basie’s library, specifically from his 1962 album “Count Basie and the Kansas City 7”. Stunning! “Davison…in particularly fine form with an emotional…effervescent…exciting trumpet solo”

The Jazz MannSun 20 e lunch:
Rachel Sutton, Jo Harrop and Eileen Hunter: “Again” Three of the 606 Club’s favorite singers, Rachel Sutton, Jo Harrop and Eileen Hunter, perform timeless vocal jazz standards. A gourmet and fun afternoon!“Sutton…must see”cabaret scenes; “Harrop…singing sensation”BeBop spoken here;[Hunter]” … amazing musician”

JazzFMSun 20 e evening:

Liana Carroll World-class performer,Liana Carroll The powerful blues-tinged vocals, combined with loud piano playing and thrilling infectious material, not to mention a wicked sense of humor, make for a truly standout gig.“Liane Carroll… she magically seems to be made of music”

The Observer

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Scifi Comedy Jazz/Classic Opera, ‘Module 471’! https://medfordjazz.org/scifi-comedy-jazz-classic-opera-module-471/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 08:15:56 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/scifi-comedy-jazz-classic-opera-module-471/ “I am human… almost entirely human… Every tendon, muscle, vessel and vein… except for parts of one leg and part of my brain…” Welcome to our project “Module 471”, a new classic comedy-science-horror-jazz/opera which will be created for the first time in the One-on-one opera festival at the Cockpit Theater in London at 8.30pm on […]]]>

“I am human… almost entirely human… Every tendon, muscle, vessel and vein… except for parts of one leg and part of my brain…”

Welcome to our project “Module 471”, a new classic comedy-science-horror-jazz/opera which will be created for the first time in the One-on-one opera festival at the Cockpit Theater in London at 8.30pm on 30th August 2022. This is a ‘scratch performance’ meaning it is the first draft and we will be involving the public to help us decide the story progression.

Our cast consists of 2 singers (Sarah Dacey and Peter Willcock), accompanied by the following instruments – Theremin, electric violin, recorders, percussion, guitar and bass guitar. The music is written by composer Lucy Mulgan and the book by comedian James Sherwood and will be conducted by Sam Redway.

We also have a community music element to this project with a choir number having been partly devised and written with adults who attend the Seaview project in Hastings. Seaview is a support center whose services help marginalized people with substance abuse issues, mental health issues, ex-offenders and at-risk offenders and rough sleepers achieve personal growth and fulfillment.

What will your money be used for

All the money we raise through this campaign will go towards a scratch performance of a work at the Tete-a-Tete Opera Festival on August 30, 2022 and will cover the costs of:

  • Musical and technical rehearsals for a cast of 6 musicians – 2 singers/instrumentalists, 1 comedian (our librettist), electric guitar, electric bass (our composer) and percussion.
  • costumes
  • Hiring our incredible director
  • Support our workshops with members of the Seaview Project in Hastings
  • Rehearsal room rental fees

As many of you know, funding is increasingly competitive in the creation of new works. Our performance at Tete-a-Tete gives us the opportunity to get our show off the ground and will help us demonstrate to future funders that there is a real demand for our work, that people want to see this show made! This allows us to gauge audience reaction and responses to the content of the work and incorporate their ideas into its final plot. The video of this first scratch performance will make a huge difference in the future development and completion of this project which will eventually become a mobile and traveling show, featuring a cast of 4 singers, perfectly suited for touring size theatres. average, arts centers and festivals across the UK and beyond.

This crowdfunding also allows us to start our partnership with ‘Seaview Project’ and offer vulnerable adults an enjoyable musical experience and provide an outlet for their creative expression.

How can you help us

Anything you can contribute to this crowdfund, no matter how small, would be amazing and a big help. If, however, you can’t afford anything right now, don’t worry. There is still a way to help…

Just share this with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, email, even just having a chat in real life 🙂 – all of this can make a huge difference to us.

We can’t wait to have fun with this piece and take the audience with us. With a little help from you, we can release ‘Module 471’ onto the unsuspecting world…and BEYOND!!!!!!

Thanks for the reading!

Lots of love,

The operators
(aka Sarah Dacey & Lucy Mulgan)

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“A band that caters to all age groups”: The In Time Band brings back 1970s Karachi rock and roll – Music https://medfordjazz.org/a-band-that-caters-to-all-age-groups-the-in-time-band-brings-back-1970s-karachi-rock-and-roll-music/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 09:23:58 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/a-band-that-caters-to-all-age-groups-the-in-time-band-brings-back-1970s-karachi-rock-and-roll-music/ Years after first picking up their instruments, the Goan-Christian band have their first-ever music video with ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’. Let’s go back to the 70s with ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ [Journey of Life]presented by the In Time Band, a group of men carrying decades of music in their hearts. Around 50 years ago, Karachi didn’t look […]]]>

Years after first picking up their instruments, the Goan-Christian band have their first-ever music video with ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’.

Let’s go back to the 70s with ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ [Journey of Life]presented by the In Time Band, a group of men carrying decades of music in their hearts.

Around 50 years ago, Karachi didn’t look like Karachi today – you’d be surprised to see the city of lights, its thriving music scene and iconic fashion. Luckily for you, all is not lost. Music dances through the veins of those who go through years and years of change. As they say, rock and roll is forever.

‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ has been a safari [journey] which is proper to it in the making. Being In Time Band’s very first music video, it “pays homage to the spirit of disco” and was meant to be a “re-recording of a lost musical treasure from Karachi’s history”.

The clip literally takes a page from the short film by Pakistani-Canadian filmmaker Hamza Bangash 1978, based on the life of Norman D’Souza, a rockstar whose life changed dramatically after the Islamization of Pakistan. “The music video takes place around the time things were changing. From my conversations with people who lived through that era, the changes were less overnight and more creeping,” Bangash said. Pictures.

The clip opens with a house party awash in warm light, the sound of a saxophone drawing us into the plot. “We are with Norman [played by Zeeshan Muhammad], in the 70s, as his bandmates try to convince him to present to the music producer whose party they are throwing,” Bangash explained. “Norman is failing because of the bigoted views the music producer has towards his community. However, as the party progresses, he meets the love of his life. Later, we see the real Norman reflect on his youth while listening to his song on the radio. It’s a bittersweet journey.

Photo: 1978: The Journey of Life/Kickstarter campaign

The filmmaker revealed that ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ is a re-recording of an original song by the group. It was specially reserved for 1978, hoping for a standalone music video. “It’s always been a dream of mine to release a music video as part of one of my films – I never thought it would be for a short film though – life works in a fun way.

” The short movie, 1978, was a huge success — we had our world premiere in competition at the Locarno Film Festival and even aired on Canadian TV. The success inspired my team and I to create something special for In Time Band and it led to us running a successful crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter,” said Bangash.

The campaign helped the project lead CityLights Media – “a Canadian-Pakistani production house that amplifies marginalized voices through film and digital content” – to raise funds to shoot the music video. Most of it was contributed by executive producer Porto Celyon who fell in love with their campaign and dedication to honoring Pakistani artists.

Bangash called it “a labor of love” that took months to shoot. It has been described as a vibrant throwback to Karachi’s glory days of the 1970s. “I’m so happy it’s out into the world now,” he added.

Where does the In Time Band come from? If this is your first time hearing about it, you really missed something. “[It] is the latest iteration in a collection of incredibly talented musicians from the Goan-Christian community, headlined by Norman D’Souza and Clifford Lucas,” said Bangash. “Norman was a legend in the 70s and used to play with The Talismen during that time, they even toured across the Far East!”

Photo: 1978: The Journey of Life/Kickstarter campaign

The filmmaker met the gang through his producer Carol Noronha as part of his research for 1978. “We collaborated with them on the film and stayed in touch. They still perform fairly regularly in Karachi and we are delighted to have been able to produce their very first music video,” he said.

In a conversation with Pictures, D’Souza traced the start of his career to the age of 14, juggling school and late-night concerts, hailing a taxi on the other side of town, all for the love of music. “At that time, I used to entertain my friends with a guitar and sing Elvis songs in blue suede shoes. They used to get really excited, they were like ‘Come on Norman, sing a song for us’ and I used to do some hip shaking. I was young of course, excited, I wanted to be like Elvis.

The musician’s stars twinkled as fate carried his boat to all sorts of shores. “In the 60’s and 70’s there were only Christian bands in Karachi and Karachi was swinging at that time. People came from Lahore, Pindi for entertainment because all the discos, night clubs and all kinds things were happening here. Karachi was like New York — that’s what people said, Karachi is our New York. We used to have artists from abroad, bands, singers [and] dancers [too].”

After building a long list of bands he’s been in and collaborated with, D’Souza finally started one with Lucas 15-20 years ago. At first it was a trio but over the years the In Time Band has grown.

Photo: 1978: The Journey of Life/Kickstarter campaign

Commenting on why the song didn’t originally become a hit, Lucas said: “There was a lot of prejudice, racism – that’s the main reason why a lot of our Christians didn’t have a opportunities at the time. ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ was originally written in the 80’s by my band which was called Vision at the time. We wanted to present PTV Music Channelthey took our demo but they never called us. There’s been no exposure for the song like bands like Strings have had – that’s what our story told by Hamza in 1978 is,” he explained.

“It’s nothing.” Elaborating on how they were treated, he said, “There are a lot of things that we didn’t depict in the film, like how we were attacked by the Jamaat-e-Islami people in Village . I was playing and they threw my keyboard in the air – we were saved from being beaten by a group of people on the buses. It was the time of Zia, that’s when the country, through Islamization and five-star hotels, began to shut down live music and nightclubs. These are eras that we have been through, that’s why it’s called ‘Zindagi Ka Safar’ because we never gave up on our music. We went through hard times and good times, and we kept playing.

The group is still in the processing phase when it comes to figuring out the fact that their first music video has been released. “Sometimes I still pinch myself and wonder if I’m dreaming,” Lucas said, adding that it also gave the band a spark, “a kick in the ass” to get them to write more music.

You can find them on their Facebook page and they also play in private shows. “People hire us for private parties and clubs. The music we play is very versatile – we can play songs from the 40s, 50s, 60s all the way up to today – [such as] Lewis Capaldi and Sia. We pride ourselves on the versatility of different genres of music that can be played. We also do Urdu, Punjabi and Arabic.

D’Souza added that they had to do it to accommodate the crowd. “We’re a group that tries to cater for all age groups – we can entertain people from 60+ and under,” Lucas said. “I think we’ve all come to terms with the fact that as long as our hands, legs and health allow us, we’ll keep playing.”

1978 was achieved through extensive research and collaboration with the Goa-Christian community of Karachi, a community that was “disproportionately affected by the radical cultural changes in 1970s Pakistan”.

Producer Noronha, also a member of the Goan-Christian community, commented on the musical invasion before social media was a thing. “Before social media, the Goan-Christian community was very active! From all the stories my dad tells me, in the 60s and 70s, our community played to live audiences in clubs, hotels, discotheques and Christmas/New Year/Easter balls as well as consulates and embassies.

“Even until a few years ago when social media wasn’t really active, as a teenager I would go to rock shows in our church grounds, private parties with our jazz bands and from live pop, to events at the KGA (Karachi Goan Association) hall and of course, weddings!

She revealed that the community also took an active role in the commercial industry – playing commercial jingles or with popular bands during the era when Indus music, PTV and MTV Pakistan was active on television. “A good number of the band members were from the Christian community and played bass, guitar, drums and several other instruments.”

Noronha added that social media is just a very recent development – ​​even before that, the Goa-Christian community flourished in the Pakistani music industry.

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He can turn anything into a drum, and Hollywood took notice https://medfordjazz.org/he-can-turn-anything-into-a-drum-and-hollywood-took-notice/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 08:00:29 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/he-can-turn-anything-into-a-drum-and-hollywood-took-notice/ Maine WF percussionist Quinn Smith has built a reputation in the music world over the past 30 years for being able to play anything. In addition to mastering just about every type of drum, he has also used old pieces of metal, pipes, wooden boxes and wine glasses during sessions for Hollywood films or with […]]]>

Maine WF percussionist Quinn Smith has built a reputation in the music world over the past 30 years for being able to play anything.

In addition to mastering just about every type of drum, he has also used old pieces of metal, pipes, wooden boxes and wine glasses during sessions for Hollywood films or with major recording artists, like Daft Punk and Tracy Chapman.

Sometimes his makeshift instruments include parts of his own body. Like when he recorded percussion for the score for the 2016 animated comedy “Storks,” featuring the vocals of Andy Samberg and Kelsey Grammar.

“He played with his body. He was slapping his cheeks and slapping his ribs,” said Los Angeles-based film composer Jeff Danna, who has worked with Smith for more than 25 years. I’m working on, I try to have it, I’m always looking for ways to make the music different. He’s just such an unusual creative mind.

Smith, who professionally uses the sole name Quinn, grew up in Old Orchard Beach and moved back to Maine this year to be closer to her parents after nearly three decades of working in Los Angeles. He now works out of a studio in the small town of Newfield, on the New Hampshire border.

The building, which was part of the former 19th-century Willowbrook Village museum complex that closed in 2016, also houses his hundreds of found or invented drums and instruments. He hopes to one day open the space as a museum and hold music workshops there as well.

“I have hundreds of drums and DIY instruments that help me create this giant library of sounds,” said Smith, 57. “Every songwriter has access to the same things. I try to find what no one else has.

WF Quinn Smith, known professionally as Quinn, taps on a piece of tin he bought at Home Depot. He has an extensive and eclectic collection of percussion instruments, some of which he created himself. Gregory Rec / Personal Photographer

FROM WONDERLAND TO HOLLYWOOD

Smith’s relatives ran the Wonderland Arcade in Old Orchard Beach for about 100 years, until 2010. He worked there from a young age, tasked with things like handing out prizes, clearing game rooms and cleaning lanes. Skee-Ball. Smith’s parents, Richard and Edna Smith, were also musicians. His father played the guitar and his mother played the organ, including in church.

Smith started playing the drums, and anything he could hit, around the age of 3. Along with other family members, including her three siblings, the Smiths often played together at home. As a teenager, he played in stage bands and marching bands at school and for local theater productions. He said there was “never a question” in his mind that he would go to college for music. He ended up at the New England Conservatory in Boston, after graduating from Old Orchard Beach High School.

Smith had played with classical bands in Maine and initially focused on classical percussion. Then he started to explore jazz and also found that satisfying. While in Boston, he worked at a drum shop and met many other musicians, some of whom played professionally.

One of these musical acquaintances worked as a drum programmer, the person who programmed the sounds on popular electronic drum machines on Top 40 recordings in the 1980s. Smith decided to move to Los Angeles and look for work doing the same. He began writing letters to composers, usually after seeing their names in the credits of a TV show, and found work.

As he gained experience, he began to be hired for other percussion and drumming work, including TV, movies, and musicians. Even then, over 30 years ago, he sold himself as someone who could bring a different sound to a recording. He carried a computer diskette containing the sounds he had created on his growing collection of instruments, including drums from the Middle East and Africa.

By the mid-1990s, he was playing in bands, recording his own albums and making films, including scores for IMAX and international films. He’s also worked on music that’s appeared on popular network TV shows, like NBC’s “Friends.”

Singer-songwriter Jaspr Byrnes recalls being first impressed by Smith’s creativity when she saw him perform at venues in Los Angeles. More than a decade later, while recording her own solo album — she also served as backing vocalist for John Prine and others — her producer suggested Smith.

“He brought a car full of instruments. I don’t know how he could put all that stuff in his car,” Byrnes said. “I think he hurt his back taking all that into the session.”

Some of Smith’s Newfield studio drums. Gregory Rec / Personal Photographer

THE RHYTHM CONTINUES

Over the years, Smith has played on recordings or live with a wide range of musicians and bands, including India Arie (on songs like “Just Do You” and “Life I Know”), Phillip Bailey (of Earth , Wind & Fire), T Bone Burnett, Belinda Carlisle, Flea (of the Red Hot Chili Peppers), Robbie Roberston, Dar Williams and Bruce Springsteen. He has also recorded over 20 of his own albums over the years.

Her film and television credits include the current Starz series “Gaslit,” starring Julia Roberts; “The Greatest Showman” (2017), with Hugh Jackman; “The City” (2010), with Ben Affleck; “The Fighter” (2010), with Christian Bale; and the live-action version of Disney’s “Lady and the Tramp” (2019).

One of the highlights of Smith’s live performance was when he played a campaign event for presidential hopeful John Kerry, the 2004 Democratic nominee. He had toured with singer-songwriter Tracy Chapman, and Chapman was part of a show that included REM, John Fogerty and Bruce Springsteen, among others.

Springsteen was intrigued by some of Smith’s unusual instruments, including a cocktail shaker made from a moth cocoon and some pebbles he tied around his ankle. So when some of the musicians were called back on stage for an encore, Springsteen asked Smith to join them, with his shaker and a tambourine.

“At one point Bruce turns his back on the audience and just jams with me. That was my Courteney Cox moment,” Smith said, referring to a 1980s Springsteen video of him dancing on stage with Cox. , giving the future “Friends” actress her first moment of fame.

Smith worked on several tracks, including “Give Life Back to Music,” “Touch” and “Motherboard,” on “Random Access Memories,” the Grammy-winning 2013 album by eclectic French electronic duo Daft Punk. from the album of the year. One of the instruments he played on this album was a “talking drum”, where he used strings to alter the pitch of the drum. He also worked with the duo on another yet to be released album.

“People always ask me if they were wearing their helmets,” Smith said, referring to the band’s stage outfits. “They were just the nicest people you would ever want to meet. They were FaceTiming with their children in Paris, with me and all my instruments.

Working remotely in Maine, Smith is always in demand. Some engineers and composers he’s worked with say the increase in the number of movies and TV shows being made for streaming services means there’s more competition among sheet music creators to come up with different sounds or originals. This is Smith’s specialty.

Musicians, engineers and composers who work with Smith said he was not only known for his unusual instruments. He has pure drumming skills – including on standard rock or jazz drum kits – that match anyone’s.

“He’s got perfect timing and this really unusual set of instruments. But it’s not just the instruments that define him, it’s the way he plays them,” said Brad Haehnel, a sound engineer who worked on the 2020 Pixar animated film “Onward” with Smith, between other projects. “Whenever someone wants something unusual, they get Quinn.”


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Physical events return for the month of Pan https://medfordjazz.org/physical-events-return-for-the-month-of-pan/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 05:00:49 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/physical-events-return-for-the-month-of-pan/ Features Melissa Doughty 5 hours ago FILE: Desperados Youth Steel Orchestra: Pan Trinbago is also emphasizing youth in its ongoing Pan Month activities which run through August 31. – The month of Pan is celebrated every August. Meanwhile, Pan Trinbago honors the instrument, its players and its accomplishments. Over the past two years, covid19 restrictions […]]]>

Features



FILE: Desperados Youth Steel Orchestra: Pan Trinbago is also emphasizing youth in its ongoing Pan Month activities which run through August 31. –

The month of Pan is celebrated every August. Meanwhile, Pan Trinbago honors the instrument, its players and its accomplishments.

Over the past two years, covid19 restrictions have driven celebrations online but, with their removal, physical events have returned.

The month usually has a specific theme. This year, each week has its own theme and these are Reintroduction, Reflection, Rejuvenation, Reharmonization and Rebranding.

The month began with Panternational, a virtual event that features regional and international bands, ensembles and soloists.

Northern Illinois University (NIU) in the United States was introduced on August 1. From August 2 to 5, Saint Lucia, Belize, Grenada, Japan and the International Panorama will be presented.

The month-long events will also include a church service, the return of Pan and Powder from City Hall to Queen’s Park Savannah, Port of Spain. and World Steelpan Day on August 11.

For Pan Trinbago president Beverley Ramsey-Moore, there is a sense of excitement as physical events return.

FILE: San Fernando Boys RC perform at Junior Panorama 2020. Pan Trinbago President Beverley Ramsey-Moore said for the month of Pan: ‘Youth are the future and so we will be honoring them at a gala and an award ceremony for young people.” –

One aspect of celebrations is usually to honor pan leaders and achievers. This year, the organization will honor some of its leaders and youth, and in particular groups that have operated continuously for 60 years or more.

“This year, the focus is definitely on our leaders and their contribution to the development of their communities through pan,” she said.

This will be done through a pan leadership recognition function.

Ramsey-Moore said: “Youth are the future so we will be honoring them with a gala and youth awards.

“When it comes to playing the instrument, it’s the young people. When you even look at the young arrangers, tuners and panmakers who are coming up now, we are extremely proud of their contribution and we want to motivate and encourage them to keep going.

There is also an important point that she wishes to emphasize during the month. Ramsey-Moore wants to make the pan declaration the official national instrument.

In 1992 Prime Minister Patrick Manning declared pan the national instrument in an Independence Day speech. But that was not recorded in Hansard. Hansard is the official record of Parliament.

Ramsey-Moore said the body wants parliament to pass legislation saying the pan is the national instrument. She added that Manning only said so in his speech.

Pan Trinbago president Beverley Ramsey-Moore. –

Discussions have taken place with the Minister of Tourism, Culture and the Arts, Randall Mitchell, on this subject.

“We hope that for 2023, as we look forward to the mother of all carnivals, there can certainly be a parliamentary proclamation. It would make those pioneers and the older people involved in the movement proud.

“Therefore, all of Parliament is saying, ‘Yes, this is indeed the national instrument of Trinidad and Tobago. “”

The call did not come from Pan Trinbago but from the pioneers, she said.

Casserole Month also comes on the heels of celebrating Casserole through a Google Doodle. The doodle typically celebrates special events, holidays, and/or historical events and happenings and was the main image on July 26.

When clicked on the doodle, it took them to an animated YouTube video. The video shows pans sticking out of oil drums and footage of panyards, doubles and snow cone vendors.

Illustrator and graphic designer TT Nicholas Huggins illustrated the video, 3D artist and motion designer Mick Seegobin did motion design. Jazz trumpeter Etienne Charles, Phase II Pan Groove’s Len “Boogsie” Sharpe, Josanne Francis, Jonathan Castro and Luke Walker also contributed.

Ramsey-Moore said she was thrilled with the doodle.

“I have to tell you that it was an important and significant day for TT. As president at that time, I can tell you that it was one of the things I wanted, this global recognition of the pan.

“Not only was it an acknowledgment of the pan, but of the fact that TT were the pioneers.”

Ramsey-Moore said she is extremely grateful and hopes it will bring more awareness to what the organization does. She added that she looked forward to more people calling on Pan Trinbago for music, but also for making pots.

As pan moves forward in a changing world, Ramsey-Moore wants to create more partnerships to ensure better documentation of pan’s story.

“We’ve had a lot of piecemeal approaches to history and documenting history. I think that’s something we need to look at so that we can definitely register anything that’s pan.

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Saranac Lake North Stream Returns for Labor Day Weekend https://medfordjazz.org/saranac-lake-north-stream-returns-for-labor-day-weekend/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/saranac-lake-north-stream-returns-for-labor-day-weekend/ The Northern Current Music Festival in Saranac Lake returns for Labor Day weekend, featuring local and international artists representing the past, present and future of contemporary music. The festival’s mission is to enrich the cultural diversity of Saranac Lake by celebrating diverse musical heritages. The event is free and family-friendly, with various activities for children […]]]>

The Northern Current Music Festival in Saranac Lake returns for Labor Day weekend, featuring local and international artists representing the past, present and future of contemporary music.

The festival’s mission is to enrich the cultural diversity of Saranac Lake by celebrating diverse musical heritages. The event is free and family-friendly, with various activities for children and adults. The day-long celebration will take place at Riverside Park in Saranac Lake on September 4.

Programming of the Northern Current Festival

TEKE

TEKE is a Japanese psych-rock band based in Montreal and made up of women.
instruments, flute and trombone alongside raging guitars and a throbbing rhythm section. They create a
a sound reminiscent of psychedelic Japanese soundtracks from the 1960s and 1970s.

teke

The big takeover

Jamaican-born singer and songwriter NeeNee Rushie fronts The Big Takeover.

Photo by Katie Palatucci

Phantom Funk Orchestra

Hailing from Brooklyn, Ghost Funk Orchestra is the brainchild of producer and multi-instrumentalist Seth Applebaum. The band has grown from a one-man band to a powerful ten-piece live band that draws heavily from the worlds of soul, psych rock, salsa and beyond.

Rose and the brothers

Rooted in the tradition of southern dance and the addition of soft vocal harmonies, Rose & The Bros of Ithaca will serve with their Louisiana sound and reggae undertones.

Outcrops

Outcroppings are northern New Jersey woods, featuring original blues-infused rock and roll. The quartet was formed in 2016 by lead singer Cassidy Rain and lead guitarist Bryan Schroder.

Crackin’ Foxy

Crackin’ Foxy is a ukulele-focused ensemble, with tight instrumental arrangements and close vocal harmonies inspired by ’30s swing, Hawaiian and NOLA jazz.

For more information on the Northern Current Music Festival taking place in Saranac Lake on September 4, go here.

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Kennedy Center Announces Attendees for Betty Carter’s 22nd Annual JAZZ AHEAD https://medfordjazz.org/kennedy-center-announces-attendees-for-betty-carters-22nd-annual-jazz-ahead/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 17:08:12 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/kennedy-center-announces-attendees-for-betty-carters-22nd-annual-jazz-ahead/ The Kennedy Center’s International Jazz Career Development Program has announced the participants for the 22nd annual Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead (BCJA) program. The two-week residency includes training in performance, composition and career development. Led by the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Director for Jazz, Jason Moran, the Jazz Ahead program identifies outstanding emerging jazz artists and composers […]]]>

The Kennedy Center’s International Jazz Career Development Program has announced the participants for the 22nd annual Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead (BCJA) program. The two-week residency includes training in performance, composition and career development. Led by the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Director for Jazz, Jason Moran, the Jazz Ahead program identifies outstanding emerging jazz artists and composers from their teens to 25s, and brings them together under the guidance of artists/ experienced instructors who mentor and advise them, polishing their performance, composition and arranging skills.

A total of 16 talented young musicians from the United States, Sweden, India, Austria and Canada were selected through a competitive audition process. Six renowned jazz artists join Moran to lead the residency: saxophonist Casey Benjamin, drummer Clarence Penn, pianist Peter Martin, trumpeter Marcus Printup, bassist Christopher Thomas and singer/saxophonist Camille Thurman. For the first time in the history of the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program, participants will interact with pre-professional dancers participating in the Kennedy Center Dance Lab (KCDL). During the first week of the program, Hope Boykin and Jason Moran, Kennedy Center Dance Lab Artistic Lead, will hold two collaborative work sessions exploring the elements of improvisation in both art forms for Jazz Ahead and Jazz Ahead students. Kennedy Center Dance Lab. This year’s program will also include a special student talk between Jason Moran, NYO Jazz Director Sean Jones and singer and Jazz Ahead alumnus Jazzmeia Horn, followed by this year’s attendees attending the National Orchestra young people from Carnegie Hall, NYO Jazz, concert on August 9 at the Théâtre de la Terrasse. The residency will end with two free performances featuring original compositions by young jazz artists on August 11 and 12 at 5 p.m. at the Théâtre de la Terrasse.

Betty Carter Jazz Ahead 2022 attendees

NAME

INSTRUMENT

RESIDENCE

Zach Adelman

Drums

UNITED STATES

Evan Amoroso

Trombone

UNITED STATES

Quinton Cain

Drums

UNITED STATES

Summer Camargue*

Trumpet

UNITED STATES

Loud Melody

Singer

UNITED STATES

Joseph Giordano

Trombone

UNITED STATES

Langston Hugh III

Saxophone

UNITED STATES

Miles Lennox*

Piano

UNITED STATES

Aditi Malhotra

Singer

India

Nicole McCabe

Saxophone

UNITED STATES

Ciara Moser

Low

Austria

Naomi Nakanishi

Piano

UNITED STATES

Ilya Osachuck

Low

Canada

Petter Pankinaho

Trumpet

Sweden

Robert Papacica

Guitar

UNITED STATES

Ben Turner

Guitar

UNITED STATES

*Former NYO Jazz attendees.

28be178f379842748afcde99b9830746.png

Press release FOR PUBLICATION:
August 1, 2022

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
announces the participants of the
22nd Annual
Jazz in front of Betty Carter
Aspiring jazz musicians take over the Kennedy Center for intensive two-week career development training

The class of 2022 includes 16 artists from five countries around the world

Young musicians will present free performances at the Kennedy Center’s Terrace Theater, August 11-12, 2022

(WASHINGTON) — The Kennedy Center’s International Jazz Career Development Program today announced participants for the 22nd annual Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead (BCJA) program. The two-week residency includes training in performance, composition and career development. Led by the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Director for Jazz, Jason Moran, the Jazz Ahead program identifies outstanding emerging jazz artists and composers from their teens to 25s, and brings them together under the guidance of artists/ experienced instructors who mentor and advise them, polishing their performance, composition and arranging skills.

A total of 16 talented young musicians from the United States, Sweden, India, Austria and Canada were selected through a competitive audition process. Six renowned jazz artists join Moran to lead the residency: saxophonist Casey Benjamin, drummer Clarence Penn, pianist Peter Martin, trumpeter Marcus Printup, bassist Christopher Thomas and singer/saxophonist Camille Thurman. For the first time in the history of the Betty Carter Jazz Ahead program, participants will interact with pre-professional dancers participating in the Kennedy Center Dance Lab (KCDL). During the first week of the program, Hope Boykin and Jason Moran, Kennedy Center Dance Lab Artistic Lead, will hold two collaborative work sessions exploring the elements of improvisation in both art forms for Jazz Ahead and Jazz Ahead students. Kennedy Center Dance Lab. This year’s program will also include a special student talk between Jason Moran, NYO Jazz Director Sean Jones and singer and Jazz Ahead alumnus Jazzmeia Horn, followed by this year’s attendees attending the National Orchestra young people from Carnegie Hall, NYO Jazz, concert on August 9 at the Théâtre de la Terrasse. The residency will end with two free performances featuring original compositions by young jazz artists on August 11 and 12 at 5 p.m. at the Théâtre de la Terrasse.

Betty Carter Jazz Ahead 2022 attendees

NAME
INSTRUMENT
RESIDENCE
Zach Adelman
Drums
UNITED STATES
Evan Amoroso
Trombone
UNITED STATES
Quinton Cain
Drums
UNITED STATES
Summer Camargue*
Trumpet
UNITED STATES
Loud Melody
Singer
UNITED STATES
Joseph Giordano
Trombone
UNITED STATES
Langston Hugh III
Saxophone
UNITED STATES
Miles Lennox*
Piano
UNITED STATES
Aditi Malhotra
Singer
India
Nicole McCabe
Saxophone
UNITED STATES
Ciara Moser
Low
Austria
Naomi Nakanishi
Piano
UNITED STATES
Ilya Osachuck
Low
Canada
Petter Pankinaho
Trumpet
Sweden
Robert Papacica
Guitar
UNITED STATES
Ben Turner
Guitar
UNITED STATES
*Former NYO Jazz attendees.

About Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead

Betty Carter founded Jazz Ahead as a vehicle to foster the musical talents of future generations of jazz artists. She originally developed the program in 1993 at 651, an arts center in Brooklyn. In 1997, the late Dr. Billy Taylor (Kennedy Center Artistic Director for Jazz, 1994-2010) invited Carter to bring Jazz Ahead to Washington, D.C. The inaugural class of Kennedy Center Jazz Ahead students performed an unforgettable concert with Carter herself joining them on the stage of the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Jason Moran, then a young pianist from Houston, is selected by Carter to be a student in this first year at the Kennedy Center. Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead had a new home, and Carter was filled with hope for the program’s future. After Carter’s untimely death in September 1998, the Carter family graciously granted the Kennedy Center the opportunity to continue its legacy by making the program an annual Kennedy Center event.

Distinguished Betty Carter Jazz Ahead alumni include pianists Jason Moran, Matthew Whitaker and Aaron Parks; guitarist Lage Lund; trombonist Andre Hayward; bassist Ameen Saleem; violinist Miri Ben-Ari; singers Charenee Wade and Jazzmeia Horn; saxophonists Marcus Strickland, Grace Kelly and Jon Irabagon, and drummer Jamison Ross, among others.

About Jazz at the Kennedy Center

Kennedy Center Jazz, under the direction of Artistic Director Jason Moran, showcases legendary artists who have helped shape the art form, artists emerging on the jazz scene, and innovative multidisciplinary projects throughout the year. Annual Kennedy Center jazz events include the professional development residency program for young artists, Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead; A Jazz Piano Christmas from NPR, the Kennedy Center holiday tradition shared by millions across the country via broadcast on NPR; and the Mary Lou Williams Jazz Festival, established in 1996 by the late Dr. Billy Taylor (Artistic Director of the Kennedy Center for Jazz, 1994-2010).

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THE SCOOP | The SweetWater Music Festival returns in September 2022 with a focus on winds https://medfordjazz.org/the-scoop-the-sweetwater-music-festival-returns-in-september-2022-with-a-focus-on-winds/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 15:42:18 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-scoop-the-sweetwater-music-festival-returns-in-september-2022-with-a-focus-on-winds/ LR (clockwise): Zeynep Özsuca, pianist; Joseph Phillips, bass; Fretless (Images courtesy of SweetWater Festival) The SweetWater Music Festival returns with a full line-up in September 2022. The festival will feature a roster of Canadian and international musicians in a series of classical, contemporary and jazz concerts in Owen Sound and Meaford, Ontario from September 15-18. […]]]>
LR (clockwise): Zeynep Özsuca, pianist; Joseph Phillips, bass; Fretless (Images courtesy of SweetWater Festival)

The SweetWater Music Festival returns with a full line-up in September 2022. The festival will feature a roster of Canadian and international musicians in a series of classical, contemporary and jazz concerts in Owen Sound and Meaford, Ontario from September 15-18.

“It’s great to be back to present a full in-person festival for 2022,” says Artistic Director Edwin Huizinga in a report. “We are thrilled to welcome some wonderful artists to Owen Sound in September, featuring winds at many of our concerts.”

A focus on the winds

This year’s festival lineup focuses on wind instruments, with resident artists Sacha Rattle (clarinet), Aleh Remezau (oboe), and Todd Williams (French horn). Other resident artists include Sheila Jaffe and Carissa Klopoushak (violin), Emily Eng (alto), Arlen Hlusko (cello), Zeynep Ozsuca (piano) and Joe Phillips (low).

Concerts at a glance

  • Thursday, September 15: Britten and Brahmsa free evening concert at Georgian Shores Church.
  • Friday, September 16: Works by Prokofiev and Schumann at the historic Leith Church, followed by a reception for the general public.
  • Saturday September 17: At 7 p.m., 20th century classical compositions at the Harmony Center in Owen Sound; then, at 9.30 p.m. the music of Arab Jazz Monekathe brainchild of Iraqi-born actor and musician Ahmed Moneka, at Heartwood Music Hall.
  • Sunday, September 18: Matinee Mainstage with JUNO Award-winning Canadian supergroup Fretless for progressive traditional music that expands the definition of the string quartet repertoire.
  • AND, The Fretless and others will play three Free community concerts at noon outside.

Choose your own price

This year, in recognition of the effects of the pandemic and inflation, the Festival is instituting a choose-your-own ticket price model for the first time. Customers can also add additional support for the festival if they wish. More information here.

A pass including four concerts, one for each day of the festival, is also available. Tickets are on sale at the ROXY Theater box office in person or online. To purchase the Series Pass, please call the box office at 519-371-2833.

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Grammy-winning Arooj Aftab’s Experimental Sufi Music Melts Into Minimalist Blur https://medfordjazz.org/grammy-winning-arooj-aftabs-experimental-sufi-music-melts-into-minimalist-blur/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 23:56:40 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/grammy-winning-arooj-aftabs-experimental-sufi-music-melts-into-minimalist-blur/ 2022 Grammy Award winner Arooj Aftab performed at the Chan Center on July 13 as part of the Indian Summer Festival. Although Aftab’s interpretation of his jazz-influenced experimental Sufi music created a distinct mystical atmosphere, the minimalist chain of long notes fades into infinity. Taking up a small part of the stage for his entire […]]]>

2022 Grammy Award winner Arooj Aftab performed at the Chan Center on July 13 as part of the Indian Summer Festival. Although Aftab’s interpretation of his jazz-influenced experimental Sufi music created a distinct mystical atmosphere, the minimalist chain of long notes fades into infinity.

Taking up a small part of the stage for his entire performance, Aftab stood in a dramatic gothic look – an all-black outfit with feathery sequined shoulder pads – accompanied by Gyan Riley on guitar and Darian Donovan Thompson on violin. She performed most of her last album Prince Vulture.

The staging, like the lyrics, was minimalist, which helped the audience focus on the music. A small table with a bottle of wine, a wineglass and a vase of roses stood next to her. Throughout the performance, she threw roses, one by one, at the audience while joking that she wanted the audience to praise her with roses instead.

His jokes suggested an awareness of his work: Aftab’s sparse vocals and ambient arrangements are critically acclaimed, but not for everyone. It helped that she clearly didn’t take herself too seriously.

His sense of humor and showmanship kept the evening light and warm. She joked that her music was about sadness and sex, which describes her well: her voice is roaring but sultry while the violin lines evoke longing and uncertainty.

Born and raised in Lahore, Pakistan, Aftab currently lives in New York, and her music is inspired by both: a blend of Sufi music and jazz.

Her voice is deep and she uses it as an instrument rather than just singing lyrics. She often does interpretations of old ghazals — a style of poetry written in the form of couplets which is also a genre of music. She tries to transform the old into something new. While his experimentation with the ghazals was interesting, it didn’t seem to lead to any concrete end result.

Its minimal style takes away most of the lyrics and therefore does no justice to the ghazals, who rely heavily on lyrics to convey their message. The second line of a verse is often a continuation of the idea presented in the first. However, its long notes often disfigure the verses to such an extent that the listener cannot piece together their meaning.

She mentioned that Indian Summer Festival founder Sirish Rao suggested playing live translations for the Hindi-Urdu lyrics on the back, to which she said it was a horrible idea because the lyrics all mean the same thing. Even though many songs are about nostalgia, ghazals have an exponentially different meaning.

For the audience who couldn’t understand the lyrics, it would have made the music even more uniform. Plus, she doesn’t use any percussion to help build and hold the beat, making it just as fluid.

His music creates a mystical and spiritual space. This is music for the bus loop after 11 p.m..m., when a few wandering souls are waiting for 99 or 84 to bring them home.

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