Jazz music – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 13:52:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz music – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 What is your pleasure? How about a t-shirt? https://medfordjazz.org/what-is-your-pleasure-how-about-a-t-shirt/ https://medfordjazz.org/what-is-your-pleasure-how-about-a-t-shirt/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 13:22:53 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/what-is-your-pleasure-how-about-a-t-shirt/ This article is part of our Business transformation special report, on how the pandemic has changed the way the world does business. Milk & Honey, the Lower East Side sweatshop that helped kick-start the American cocktail revival when it opened on December 31, 1999, was as famous for what it didn’t have as it did […]]]>

This article is part of our Business transformation special report, on how the pandemic has changed the way the world does business.


Milk & Honey, the Lower East Side sweatshop that helped kick-start the American cocktail revival when it opened on December 31, 1999, was as famous for what it didn’t have as it did for what it had.

There was soft jazz music, candles, cucumber water, posted rules of etiquette, bartenders in disguise and, of course, expertly crafted classic cocktails. What he didn’t have was a printed address, exterior signage, a phone number, a reservation system, or a menu. And there was certainly no merchandise.

Indeed, hardly any of the craft cocktail bars that popped up in the 2000s and 2010s sold t-shirts and baseball caps. It was contrary to their vision, which emphasized authenticity, artistry and purity of purpose. T-shirts were associated with low-end pubs and famous bars that had sold their souls for an extra dollar a long time ago.

In 2012, Milk & Honey became Attaboy. Although the name has changed, the space still looks the same and the bar program is recognizable in Milk and Honey mode. There are, however, differences. If you go to Attaboy website, you can buy a T-shirt. It says “Attaboy” on it, is available in black or white, and costs $ 30. There’s also a shirt covered in illustrations of Penicillin, a cocktail invented at Milk & Honey in 2005 and now found in bars around the world. The shirt costs $ 60.

Attaboy is not an outlier. Since the pandemic hit in March 2020, American cocktail bars have gone crazy. They sell hats, shirts, bags, personalized glassware, shakers, scarves, bandanas, hoodies, pins, jackets, books and gift cards – even nail polish and puzzles. Online stores have popped up – or are expected to appear soon – on the websites of some of the country’s most famous drinking establishments, including Death & Co., Amor y Amargo, Dear Irving, and Raines Law Room, all in Manhattan. ; Clover Club and Leyenda in Brooklyn; Navy Force in Seattle; Nickel City in Austin; and Sweet Liberty in Miami.

Meaghan Dorman, partner of Raines Law Room and Dear Irving – both of whom have Manhattan locations – had thought of getting into merchandise in the past, but never sued him, as his bars were popular and occupied. . “We didn’t have time,” she said. But then the lockdown came, “and we’ve had a lot of time.”

Ms Dorman began offering a range of stylish scarves, bandanas, pocket squares and tote bags in early 2021, their design inspired by the slightly risky wallpaper found in bar bathrooms. As with most other bars that ventured into merchandise during the Covid era, finding a new source of income was his main motivation.

But it was not the only one.

“It got us thinking about how attached people are to the bar,” Ms. Dorman said. “I want this experience to last for people. We wanted to do something to keep the name of the bar and make it think of us. Regulars, who were keen to support their favorite water points during the pandemic, were more than happy to help.

Julie Reiner, owner of Clover Club and Leyenda in Brooklyn, had a similar thought when in 2020 she made a Clover Club t-shirt for the first time in the bar’s 11-year history. “We thought we really should do something more permanent to sell to people,” who were missing the bar, she said. “We also realized that people really wanted Clover Club and Leyenda t-shirts. “

Ms. Reiner is redesigning the The Clover Club website and will soon start offering hoodies and hats. When Ms. Reiner first began to consider retail, her mind turned to Sweet Freedom, a Miami bar with an exuberant joie de vivre attitude that opened in 2015.

From the start he was selling jackets and hats adorned with the bar’s two signature slogans: “Pursue Happiness” and another that celebrates Miami but cannot be printed here.

“It matched the atmosphere of the bar perfectly,” Ms. Reiner said.

“We never had this stigma about merchandise,” said Dan Binkiewicz, one of the bar’s owners, “long before Covid.”

The “Pursue Happiness” baseball caps began as a form of guerrilla marketing. Partners gave them away to promote their bar and took a hit on the cost. Soon people started asking to buy them. Today, near the entrance to the bar, there is a cabinet full of goods. The jackets, which are bestsellers, cost $ 125.

Perhaps no online cocktail bar store is better stocked than that of Mort & Cie., New York’s pioneering cocktail destination that now has locations in Denver and Los Angeles. There are t-shirts of various designs, home bartender kits, books, newspapers, napkins and ceramic mugs in the shape of rats, pirates, and the Capital Records building in Los Angeles. Other articles are in preparation for 2022.

David Kaplan, co-founder of Death & Co., said the line of merchandise was already on sale before the pandemic.

“It wasn’t done by Covid,” he said, “but Covid has certainly brought it to the fore and allowed us to focus a lot of attention on it.”

Mr Kaplan said income from the goods was $ 8,000 per month before the lockdown; in the months that followed, it shot up to $ 40,000. It has since stabilized somewhere in the middle.

“It’s a bit dangerous,” he said, “because it’s hard for the quality of these things to match the quality of the experience you have in one of our bars.”

Mr. Kaplan doesn’t expect that many cocktail bars will sell merchandise in a big way, given the sheer start-up cost and amount of work involved – all for what ends up being a minor percentage of the bottom line. net. That said, it looks like the cocktail bar baseball cap is here to stay.

“Once you’ve made the effort, even if it’s a small amount of money, we are more than grateful to you,” said Ms. Dorman, who recently placed a bulk order for 300 scarves. “I don’t think it’s ever going to be huge, but it can be important. Every little bit counts. It has become important not to rely on just one source of income.


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HSU’s Department of Dance, Music and Drama is hosting a Faculty Artist Series concert on October 23 – Redheaded Blackbelt https://medfordjazz.org/hsus-department-of-dance-music-and-drama-is-hosting-a-faculty-artist-series-concert-on-october-23-redheaded-blackbelt/ https://medfordjazz.org/hsus-department-of-dance-music-and-drama-is-hosting-a-faculty-artist-series-concert-on-october-23-redheaded-blackbelt/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 07:00:41 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/hsus-department-of-dance-music-and-drama-is-hosting-a-faculty-artist-series-concert-on-october-23-redheaded-blackbelt/ Pianist Daniela Mineva [Courtesy HSU Music Department] Live classical music returns to the Fulkerson Recital Hall stage on Saturday, October 23 at 7:00 p.m. Please join the HSU Faculty of Music as they present their first concert in the Faculty Artist Series of the New Academic Year. Audiences keen to hear some of their favorite […]]]>

Pianist Daniela Mineva [Courtesy HSU Music Department]

Live classical music returns to the Fulkerson Recital Hall stage on Saturday, October 23 at 7:00 p.m. Please join the HSU Faculty of Music as they present their first concert in the Faculty Artist Series of the New Academic Year. Audiences keen to hear some of their favorite local musicians live will have the option of attending the concert in person or purchasing a LIVESTREAM link, allowing them to attend the concert remotely from their own living room. $ 15 General, $ 5 Children aged 12 to 18, $ 5 HSU students with ID, $ 7 Livestream.

The Arcata Bay String Quartet [Courtesy HSU Music Department]

The evening’s repertoire includes the Arcata Bay String Quartet performing the cross-composition No Mystery by Chick Corea and the astonishing and popular work Strum by Jesse Montgomery. Violinist Cindy Moyer and pianist Daniela Mineva perform the magnificent Baroque composition Chaconne in G minor, attributed to Tomaso Antonio Vitali, and Mineva joins cellist Garrick Woods performing the second sonata for cello and piano by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu, exploring deeply and deeply. playful way a mid twentieth century fusion between American jazz and Czech folk music.

These talented musicians are delighted to be back in the recital hall and share their collaborations with a live audience. Mineva describes the circumstances which inspired Martinu’s Sonata, explaining that “(it was) one of the first works completed by Martinu after his emigration to the United States with his wife and children (in 1941, fleeing the invasion German of France). He was very stressed and his homesickness was painful. In this music, the Czech character of the melodies is reinforced in all movements, until the finale synthesizes the house and the new world with a fusion of jazz and bohemian folk melody.

ABSQ violinist Karen Davy shares that she enjoys working on music outside of the standard repertoire, as well as her enthusiasm for how many current composers and arrangers are embracing the string quartet as their vehicle for performance. new sounds and energy with a broad appeal. “No Mystery is a piece composed by jazz artist Chick Corea for a studio album by his jazz-rock fusion band Return to Forever,” Davy explains. “It was arranged for string quartet by David Balakrishnan of the Turtle Island String Quartet, a group known for their hybrid performances of jazz, classical music and rock. Jessie Montgomery is considered one of America’s best young female songwriters who soak up a 21st century American sound that blends classical, rock, jazz, spiritual, and even social justice issues. Strum is the title song of his debut album, ”adds Davy.

Before purchasing tickets for the live event, please familiarize yourself with the current COVID-19 campus guidelines which are detailed on the ticketing link. Also note that proof of vaccination is required for admission, children under 12 will not be admitted at this time. Buying tickets in advance is highly recommended as only 70 seats will be sold, allowing for social distancing.

Date: Saturday 23 October 2021

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Location: Fulkerson Recital Hall, Humboldt State University, Arcata CA 95521

Price: $ 15 general, $ 5 for children ages 12-18, $ 5 for HSU students with ID, $ 7 live

Purchasing Tickets and Live Streaming: https://commerce.cashnet.com/humboldthmo?CNAME=MUSIC+1

Contact: HSU Department of Dance, Music and Drama, 707-826-3566, [email protected]


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An afternoon with the Rehoboth Beach Jazz Festival https://medfordjazz.org/an-afternoon-with-the-rehoboth-beach-jazz-festival/ https://medfordjazz.org/an-afternoon-with-the-rehoboth-beach-jazz-festival/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 21:55:45 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/an-afternoon-with-the-rehoboth-beach-jazz-festival/ Club saxophonist Phred Gaetano ‘Vince’ Vinciguerra in the midst of a long breath. Fred Dawson of Club Phred is the 2021 Rehoboth Beach Jazz Festival Producer of the Year. Club Phred guitarist Brian Scott is having a blast. Fred Dawson of Club Phred loves the organ so much that he has matching socks. Playing Unchain […]]]>

Club saxophonist Phred Gaetano ‘Vince’ Vinciguerra in the midst of a long breath.

Fred Dawson of Club Phred is the 2021 Rehoboth Beach Jazz Festival Producer of the Year.

Club Phred guitarist Brian Scott is having a blast.

Fred Dawson of Club Phred loves the organ so much that he has matching socks.

Playing Unchain My Heart for a bit gets the crowd dancing.

The Rudder’s outdoor patio makes it an ideal location.

As well as playing the drums and signing at the same time, Club Phred drummer Jim Palmer could chew gum, sew, do crossword puzzles, and tie his shoes.

Art Sherrod Jr. keyboardist Warren Jones smiles as he plays.

Art Sherrod Jr. celebrated the release of his album at Rusty Rudder.

Art Sherrod Jr. is, according to its website, both art and soul.

Art drummer Sherrod Jr. Spider keeps the rest of his bandmates in line.

Art Sherrod Jr. rocks the crowd with a clap.

Art Sherrod Jr., right, and guitarist Stan Cooper feel the music on a beautiful afternoon.

Gerald Veasley’s Unscripted All-Stars performed on Saturday, October 16 at the Rehoboth Beach Convention Center. This is guitarist Paul Jackson.

Carol Riddick, unscripted singer of Gerald Veasley’s All-Stars.

Everette Harp, Gerald Veasley’s All-Stars unscripted saxophonist.

Carol Riddick with the rest of Gerald Veasley’s unscripted stars

Jackiem Joyner, Gerald Veasley’s All-Stars unscripted saxophonist.

Bassist Gerald Veasley puts the music together.


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Cal Poly’s fall jazz concert celebrating the CD release is scheduled for November 12 • Atascadero News https://medfordjazz.org/cal-polys-fall-jazz-concert-celebrating-the-cd-release-is-scheduled-for-november-12-atascadero-news/ https://medfordjazz.org/cal-polys-fall-jazz-concert-celebrating-the-cd-release-is-scheduled-for-november-12-atascadero-news/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 21:38:50 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/cal-polys-fall-jazz-concert-celebrating-the-cd-release-is-scheduled-for-november-12-atascadero-news/ SAN LUIS OBISPO – After more than a year of virtual musical creation, the Cal Poly jazz groups will resume their concerts in person at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, November 12, in the Center for the Performing Arts Pavilion. The Cal Poly Jazz Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Contemporary Jazz Ensemble will be joined by […]]]>

SAN LUIS OBISPO – After more than a year of virtual musical creation, the Cal Poly jazz groups will resume their concerts in person at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, November 12, in the Center for the Performing Arts Pavilion.

The Cal Poly Jazz Ensemble, Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Contemporary Jazz Ensemble will be joined by the new Commercial Music Ensemble, which performs rock, Motown, funk, modern pop, video game music and other styles. popular music from a jazz perspective. Arthur White, director of jazz studies, leads the groups.

The concert will celebrate both the return of live concerts and the release of the double album “Another Hour, Another Place”, which was recorded during the pandemic from the homes of the students. The CD features the Jazz Ensemble and the Vocal Jazz Ensemble performing original compositions and new arrangements by White and Davis Zamboanga (Music, ’20).

The CD also features musicians considered among the best artists in jazz today: trombonist Robin Eubanks, vibraphonist Joe Locke, saxophonist Ada Rovatti and Grammy Award-winning trumpeter Randy Brecker. You can find more information on the album creation process in this recent history of Cal Poly News.

Go through this together, Atascadero

The program will also include compositions that have been performed by the Count Basie Orchestra, Yellowjackets, Tower of Power, Aretha Franklin, New York Voices, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, and others.

The “Another Time, Another Place” CD will be available for purchase at the concert, as well as “Unify,” White’s latest CD featuring members of the San Luis Obispo jazz community. Sales of both albums will directly benefit Cal Poly’s jazz studies program.

Tickets are $ 20 for the public and $ 10 for students and members of the Jazz Federation. Parking for the event is sponsored by the PAC. Tickets are available at Cal Poly ticket office between noon and 6 p.m. from Monday to Saturday. To order by phone, dial 805-SLO-4TIX (805-756-4849).

The concert is sponsored by the Cal Poly Music Department, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Educational Activities Program. For more information, call the Department of Music at 805-756-2406 or visit its calendar site.


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Jazz season is finally here with sounds across the spectrum https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-season-is-finally-here-with-sounds-across-the-spectrum/ https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-season-is-finally-here-with-sounds-across-the-spectrum/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 15:10:01 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-season-is-finally-here-with-sounds-across-the-spectrum/ Breadcrumb Links Music Local arts Author of the article: Roger levesque Release date : October 14, 2021 • 42 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation Saxophonist David Babcock is bringing his band The Nightkeepers to the Yardbird Suite this weekend and conducting his Jump Trio at the Spotlight Cabaret every […]]]>

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As musicians of all stripes struggle to find performance opportunities, three of the city’s most accomplished saxophonist conductors have cooked up some great options for jazz and blues fans.

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Jazz blues

It’s no surprise that Dave Babcock is currently straddling two different bands and sounds.

“I’m excited about both possibilities,” he says, “and just being able to play live again means so much when you couldn’t. This shared experience is the real reward.

There’s a new weekly jazz matinee Saturday at the Spotlight Cabaret that sees the reedman singer in front of a trio of jumps with Chris Andrew on keys, Rubim de Toledo on bass and Jamie Cooper on drums. They play two sets on site, 8217 104 St., reservation tickets are $ 12 at projectorcabaret.ca .

It’s a continuation of the concept of a jumping orchestra that Babcock conceived over 20 years ago with a repertoire that spans retro jazz classics with that bouncy jumping spirit, occasional ballads and originals too.

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Babcock then rekindles a blues angle with The Nightkeepers – together on and off over the past decade, the group taps into classic rhythm and blues, leaning towards vintage Texas and jumping grooves, and adding more original tunes. Fellow Rockin ‘Highliners Alex Herriot picks up guitar alongside David Aide aka Rooster Davis on keyboards, bassist Harry Gregg and again Cooper’s drums. Babcock is a versatile player but the saxophonist excels in jazz blues and the Nightkeepers are a great inspiration for that.

Nightkeepers shows are virtual only in accordance with Yardbird’s current policy and both ensembles run from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., with $ 10 and $ 8 tickets for students / seniors at yardbirdsuite.com .

Like so many others, Babcock faced a new realization of the precariousness of a musical career during the pandemic period.

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“The music business has never been easy, but I didn’t have a plan B,” he explains, “so it’s a struggle not being able to do what you love to do and a quadruple hard blow: you can’t play, can’t earn a living, can’t see fellow musicians and friends, or audience. You can practice, write, or record, but you have to get out. There is a form of training and a form of play, engaging with an audience, getting back into the mix.

Babcock has contributed to new recordings for Dana Wylie and Sammy Volkeov, and has sorted through his personal archives built up over some four decades. Meditating helped him get through the dark days and inevitable downtime of the past few months. Eventually he reached a new awareness.

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“In the future, I want to focus more on the music I want to play, with the people I want to play with, the more creative and music-oriented shows,” he says. “The more you are there, the more you realize that this is a precious thing, and you make it a priority.”

Big band jazz

Talk to Don Berner and you will quickly realize how much he loves big band music. In addition to her serious artistry as a saxophonist, her studious knowledge of the genre suggests that the second season of the Don Berner Big Band will really be something to hear when it debuts on October 16 in a concert called Back With Basie.

This is William “Count” Basie (1904-1984) for the uninitiated, one of the greatest conductors of the golden age of big jazz bands.

“The Basie group basically created modern rhythmic concepts in jazz,” says Berner. “One of the reasons they made you feel so good is because they came up with the contemporary idea of ​​swing. They’ve been going for 40 or 50 years, so there are different ideas of the Basie sound, but I’m trying to represent every part of that spectrum.

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He notes that popular audiences are more familiar with the band Basie on Frank Sinatra’s live album Sinatra At The Sands and that some of that repertoire will be included in the setlist, like Fly Me To The Moon, alongside the clips. Basie’s instrumental songs like One O’Clock Jump. .

At the height of the Basie formation, group number 17 for this concert with five saxophones including Berner and Ray Baril on the viola and Jim Brenan on the tenor, three trombones, four trumpets including Joel Gray and the brother of the leader Doug Berner, a expert rhythm section, and singer Kelly Alanna.

The Saturday show will be at 7:30 p.m. at Ottewell United Church, 6611 93A Ave. Tickets cost $ 31.50 and $ 26 for tixonthesquare.ca students. Tickets for the entire season of three Berner Big Band concerts are $ 115, which includes the Sinatra Tribute Christmas Show with singer Johnny Summers (December 18) and The First Ladies Of Jazz on March 19, 2019. where four singers (Shelley Jones, Natalie B., Renee Suchy, Kelly Alana) pay tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day, Dinah Washington and the Andrews Sisters.

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Berner started his first big band season with two popular shows just months before the pandemic and couldn’t finish until things closed. He practiced a lot, read a lot of books and got married in the summer of 2020 while taking care of everything to prepare for this comeback.

Saxophonist Don Berner stands and leads his big band in a new season of concerts, paying homage to Count Basie on October 16.
Saxophonist Don Berner stands and leads his big band in a new season of concerts, paying homage to Count Basie on October 16. Photo by provided /Postmedia

His vast experience includes gigs in the Tommy Banks Big Band and pretty much every other type of ensemble. I wondered where he saw the big band audience today.

“I’m trying to tap into a new generation of big band audiences, but it’s a tough time for live music,” Berner admits. “Big band music is important because it’s fun and flashy. It gives the audience a point of access to the density of contemporary jazz in small groups. It’s rooted in dance music but there are always elements of jazz that I love, improvisation and swing, and I want it to be as accessible as possible.

Simply good jazz

Finally, this treasure of the Canadian jazz scene, veteran saxophonist PJ Perry spends time in his own weekly residence every Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Rigoletto’s Cafe, 10305 100 Ave.

yegarts@postmedia.com

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What would summer days be without jazz and cocktails? https://medfordjazz.org/what-would-summer-days-be-without-jazz-and-cocktails/ https://medfordjazz.org/what-would-summer-days-be-without-jazz-and-cocktails/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 08:59:08 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/what-would-summer-days-be-without-jazz-and-cocktails/ #CourvoisierMoments – an award-winning jazz and cognac cocktail. (Image: Instagram Photos / Ramsy) She dances barefoot, wearing the prettiest high waisted dress. Dressed in a suit and moccasins, he is at the height of his energy and his movements, their two heads bowed, soft smiles on their lips. The famous image of Malian photographer Malick […]]]>

#CourvoisierMoments – an award-winning jazz and cognac cocktail. (Image: Instagram Photos / Ramsy)

She dances barefoot, wearing the prettiest high waisted dress. Dressed in a suit and moccasins, he is at the height of his energy and his movements, their two heads bowed, soft smiles on their lips. The famous image of Malian photographer Malick Sidibe is in black and white but the energy is in technicolor.

You can almost imagine that they are dancing the tsaba-tsaba, and you can hear the music they are vibrating to. Something reminiscent of the days of The Jazz Epistles, Abdullah Ibrahim, Hugh Masekela, Miriam Makeba, Dorothy Masuka … some of the names that are the basis of South African jazz music. A sound influenced by the rich cultural heritage of the people of the nation and of course by African and African American music.

These musicians in turn influenced the birth of new names such as Thandi Ntuli, Bokani Dyer, Sisonke Xonti, Mandisi Dyantyis, Nduduzo Makhatini, Benjamin Jephta, the Brother Moves On among others who have perpetuated the music of the 50s to create a new and the particular sound of jazz and the jazz tradition.

It’s that same sound that brings guest Tumi Morule out of his seat and spontaneously begins riffing at Bokani Dyer on the keys, on the roof of Southern Sun Hyde Park during a #CourvoisierMoments event. Then a young couple sets out on the dance floor. She wears heels and a canary yellow dress with fluttering pleated panels when turned by her vividly dressed partner wearing a shiny fedora, waistcoat and moccasins.

These are #MomentsCourvoiser – an invitation to celebrate and appreciate the finer things in life, and to truly savor life’s joyful moments through music and food.

Award-winning jazz artists Bokani Dyer and Sisonke Xonti alongside DJ Kenzhero and Tha Muzik are part of the musical program supported by Shilungwa Mhinga, to create an upbeat and uplifting modern jazz musical tapestry.

Dyer’s latest album, Kelenosi, is a genre-defying offering. Composed and recorded during confinement, it explores and offers interpretive jazz, electronic dance and afrobeats. As he taps the keys and improvises at the microphone, the sun is finally breaking through the clouds on this rainy Saturday afternoon.

Muzi Mtshali aka DJ Tha Muzik, known for playing house rhythms influenced by funk, jazz and hiphop with Afro and Latin sounds hops on the decks to change the tempo.

Along with music maestro Kenneth Nzama aka DJ Kenzhero, he is the co-founder of Obrigado evenings inspired by Latin African music and bossa nova and a show called What is Wrong with Grooving, an audio documentary that has studied various socio-political problems based on poetry. and music compiled by the duo. The now-defunct show paid tribute to trombonist Jonas Gwangwa, Masekela, among other jazz greats. Tha Muzik and Kenzhero are an integral part of modern Johannesburg musical culture.

Courvoisier daytime opportunity reimagined

The set of elegantly dressed revelers, rooftop setting and music combine to create an intoxicating cocktail. In fact, it is this particular recipe that inspired the creation of two Courvoisier cocktails, and reinvented for a contemporary audience. Fresh and vibrant while remaining true to its heritage roots, the Gala and the French Twist are joyful, generous and sophisticated at the same time.

And as the tunes mellow, the sun sets gently over Sandton’s skyline, and cocktails give way to goblets of Courvoisier VSOP on the rocks. Music is a unifier; and jazz music creates community. South African jazz puts you under your skin and has the ability to be completely transporting through its global influences and interpretations, to take you on a mad rush with its trance rhythm and to instantly make you feel at home at the same time. thanks to the instrumentation and the unique marabi sound. Explaining its social impact in an interview with IOL, Makhatini said, “Jazz is a genre that relies on the surrounding conversations of surrounding energy fields.”

He was referring to the role he has played in the lives of black South Africans since the 1950s and 1960s; how sound developed to reflect the times and evolves as it is touched by artists who have now pioneered and continue to redefine the sound of 21st century jazz, one of the forms most dynamic African art, to quote writer and music researcher Gwen Ansell.

This article is sponsored by Courvoisier produced by BrandStudio24 for News24.


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Jazz Jam Festival at the Hilton Garden Inn on October 25; profits go to the Universal Temple of the Arts https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-jam-festival-at-the-hilton-garden-inn-on-october-25-profits-go-to-the-universal-temple-of-the-arts/ https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-jam-festival-at-the-hilton-garden-inn-on-october-25-profits-go-to-the-universal-temple-of-the-arts/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 00:30:18 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-jam-festival-at-the-hilton-garden-inn-on-october-25-profits-go-to-the-universal-temple-of-the-arts/ STATEN ISLAND, NY – The Fifth Annual Staten Island Vinnie Ruggieri Jazz Jam Festival is scheduled for Monday, October 25 from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. in the Lobby Lounge at the Hilton Garden Inn, Bloomfield, where the musical performance coordinators are musicians Ray Scro and Frank Ferreri. The event pays tribute to jazz musician […]]]>

STATEN ISLAND, NY – The Fifth Annual Staten Island Vinnie Ruggieri Jazz Jam Festival is scheduled for Monday, October 25 from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. in the Lobby Lounge at the Hilton Garden Inn, Bloomfield, where the musical performance coordinators are musicians Ray Scro and Frank Ferreri.

The event pays tribute to jazz musician Vincent (Vinnie) Ruggieri, a longtime islander and full-time jazz musician, who died in 2011.

He shared the bandstand with notables such as Thad Jones, Phil Woods and The Bill Mitchell Quartet. He was a member of the Staten Island Chamber Ensemble Jazz Quartet, with renowned horn player Mike Morreale, and was a former member of the Al Lambert Orchestra.

At the time of his death, Vinnie was one of New York’s busiest keyboardists, performing 25 to 30 concerts a month.

Staten Island’s Fifth Annual Vinnie Ruggieri Jazz Jam Festival takes place on Monday, October 25 at the Hilton Garden Inn. (Courtesy / Al Lambert) Staten Island Advance

Profits from the event will go to the Universal Temple of the Arts. The event will also serve to commemorate Sajda Musawwir Ladner, who died in August at the age of 80.

She was a founding member of Universal Temple of the Arts (UTA), a pioneering nonprofit organization established in 1967 to support and showcase artists of color, and subsequently served as the organization’s artistic director and executive. . She led both artistic activities at UTA – musical performances, Staten Island Jazz Festival, poetry – and community work, especially when it came to children and young adults.

Musicians wishing to perform that evening must register before the time – or at the door.

The organizers ask you to bring your instruments. Piano, drums, guitar and bass amps will be provided.

There is an entrance fee of $ 15. Food and spirits are available on request.

The evening will feature professional musicians who will come together for an evening of live jazz music.

“It’s a pleasure to see professional unrepetited art presented so well in front of you,” said Al Lambert, Music Director / Conductor and Performer. “The spirit in the room is contagious. The cause is the Universal Temple of the Arts on Jersey Street and the memory of Vinnie Ruggieri and the late founder and director of the Temple, Sadja Ladner, who passed away as we prepared for the event. She was an angel and will be missed so much. I would like to thank Ray Scro and Frank Ferreri for their incredible support and hard work as committee members and planners, as well as Richard and Lois Nicotra at the Hilton for their support.

Al Lambert

Al Lambert with Lenore Lambert, Stu Waters on keyboard and Terry Fabrizio on guitar, will perform at Neapoli’s Reataurant in Red Bank, NJ on Thursday, October 28. (Courtesy / Al Lambert) Staten Island AdvanceStaten Island Advance

Lambert’s next appearance will be at the Neapoli Restaurant in Red Bank, NJ on Thursday, October 28, where he will play the Great American Songbook, “Rock to Frank,” where the dinner show is at 7pm. $ 15. All COVID-19 rules apply.


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A surprising trick will help humans avoid a dystopian “Matrix” future https://medfordjazz.org/a-surprising-trick-will-help-humans-avoid-a-dystopian-matrix-future/ https://medfordjazz.org/a-surprising-trick-will-help-humans-avoid-a-dystopian-matrix-future/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 20:36:25 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/a-surprising-trick-will-help-humans-avoid-a-dystopian-matrix-future/ In his autobiography, Miles Davis complained that classical musicians were like robots. He spoke from experience – he had studied classical music at Juilliard and recorded with classical musicians even after becoming a world famous jazz artist. As a music teacher at the University of Florida, which turns into “AI University”I often think of Davis’ […]]]>

In his autobiography, Miles Davis complained that classical musicians were like robots.

He spoke from experience – he had studied classical music at Juilliard and recorded with classical musicians even after becoming a world famous jazz artist.

As a music teacher at the University of Florida, which turns into “AI University”I often think of Davis’ lyrics and how musicians have become more machine-like over the past century. At the same time, I see how machines are improving to mimic human improvisation, in all aspects of life.

I wonder what the limits of machine improvisation will be, and what human activities will survive the rise of intelligent machines.

The rise of mechanical improvisation

Machines have long excelled in activities involving the consistent reproduction of a stationary object – think identical Toyotas mass-produced in a factory.

More improvised activities are less rule-based, more fluid, chaotic or reactive, and are more process-oriented. AI has made great strides in this area.

Consider the following examples:

  • The trading stalls of Wall Street, Tokyo and London were once filled with the vibrant chaos of traders shouting and signaling orders, reacting in real time to changing conditions. These commercial pits were for the most part replaced by algorithms.
  • Autonomous driving technology may soon replace human drivers, automating our fluid decision-making processes. Autonomous vehicles currently stumble where greater mastery of improvisation is required, such as deal with pedestrians.
  • Many live social interactions have been replaced by the sterile activity of carefully composing emails or social media posts. The predictive text of emails will continue to evolve, bringing an increasingly transactional quality to our relationships. (“Hey Siri, email Amanda and congratulate her on her promotion.”)
  • IBM’s computer Deep Blue defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997, but it took 20 more years to The AI ​​to defeat top Go board game players. This is because Go has a much larger number of possible move choices at any given time, and hardly any specific rules – it requires more improvisation. However, humans ultimately did not become matched to machines: in 2019, former world champion Lee Sedol retired from professional gaming, citing the ascendancy of AI as the reason.
Chess enthusiasts watch world chess champion Garry Kasparov at the start of the sixth and final match against IBM’s Deep Blue computer in 1997.STAN HONDA / AFP / Getty Images

Music becomes more mechanical

Machines replace human improvisation at a time when classical music abandoned it.

Before the 20th century, almost all the great figures of Western artistic music excelled in composition, performance and improvisation. Johann Sebastian Bach was best known as an organist, with his first biographer describing his organ improvisations as “more devout, solemn, dignified and sublime” than his compositions.

But the twentieth century saw the bursting of the singer-songwriter-improviser tradition into specialized fields.

Performers were confronted with the rise of recording techniques which inundated consumers with versions of fixed, homogeneous and objectively correct compositions. Classical musicians constantly had to deliver technically flawless live performances to match, sometimes reducing the music to a sort of Olympiad.

Classical pianist Glenn Gould was both a source and a product of this state of affairs – he despised the rigidity and competitiveness of live performance and retired from the stage at the age of 31, but retired to the studio to assemble carefully visionary masterpieces impossible to perform in one take.

Most composers have abandoned the serious pursuit of improvisation or performance. Modernists have become increasingly fascinated with procedures, algorithms and mathematical models, reflecting contemporary technological developments. The ultra-complex compositions of High Modernism required machine precision on the part of the performers, but many postmodern minimalist scores also required robotic precision.

A depiction of the excerpt from ‘Lemma-Icon-Epigram.’

Improvisation ceased to be a part of classical music almost entirely, but flourished in a new art form: jazz. Yet jazz has struggled to achieve parity, especially in the United States, its home country, in large part because of systemic racism. The classical world even has its own version of the “one drop rule”: Works containing improvisation or written by jazz composers are often rejected as illegitimate by the classic establishment.

A recent New York Times item called on orchestras to open up to improvisation and to collaborate with jazz luminaries such as the saxophonist Roscoe Mitchell, who has composed numerous works for orchestra.

But college and university music programs separated and marginalized jazz studies, leaving orchestral musicians deprived of training in improvisation. Instead, musicians in an orchestra are seated according to their objectively ranked ability, and their job is to replicate the movements of the lead player.

They are the machines of the music world. In the future, will they be the most disposable?

Davis perfects the art of imperfection

The march of AI continues, but will it ever be able to engage in real improvisation?

Machines easily reproduce objects, but improvisation is a process. In pure musical improvisation, there is no predetermined structure and no objectively correct performance.

And improvisation is not just instant composition; if that was the case, then the AI ​​would make the distinction between the two disappear due to its computational speed.

On the contrary, improvisation has an elusive human quality resulting from the tension between skill and spontaneity. Machines will always be highly skilled, but will they one day be able to stop calculating and switch to an intuitive mode of creation, like a jazz musician moving from the rehearsal hall to the concert?

Davis reached a point at Juilliard where he had to decide his future. He was deeply connected with classical music and was known to walk around with Stravinsky sheet music in his pocket. He would later hire Bach composers in Stockhausen and record jazz interpretations of compositions by Manuel de Falla, Heitor Villa-Lobos and Joaquín Rodrigo.

Yet there were many reasons to abandon the classical world for jazz. Davis says he played “about two notes every 90 bars” in the orchestra. This contrasted sharply with the extraordinary challenge and stimulation of late night jam sessions with musicians like Monk Thelonious and Charlie parker.

He lived the reality of racism and “knew that no white symphony orchestra was going to hire [him]. “(By contrast, Davis regularly hired white players, like Lee Konitz, Bill Evans, and John McLaughlin.)

And he was the antithesis of a machine.

But in jazz, Davis has managed to transform his technical struggles with the trumpet into an iconic and haunting sound. Its wrong notes, missed notes and cracked notes have become hissings, whispers and sighs expressing the human condition. Not only did he have these “errors”, he also actively courted them with a risky approach that favored line color and expression over precision.

It was the art of imperfection, and this is the paradox of jazz. Davis left Juilliard after three semesters, but went on to become one of the most important musical figures of the 20th century.

Miles Davis embraced the skeletons and the whistling of the trumpet.

Today the terrain has changed.

Juilliard has a thriving jazz program led by another trumpeter versed in both classical music and jazz – Wynton marsalis, who received two classic Grammy Awards for his solo work. And while the ‘robots coming for our jobs’ narrative is cliché, these shifts happen quickly, considerably accelerated by the events of the past year.

We’re heading into a time when real robots could eventually replace Davis’ classic “robots” – perhaps some of the 20 violinists in a symphony orchestra – if only at first as a gimmick.

However, we may soon find that jazz artists are irreplaceable.

This article was originally published on The conversation by Rich Pellegrin. Read it original article here.


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John Coltrane: A Love Supreme Live in Seattle review – a unique record from a historic band | Music https://medfordjazz.org/john-coltrane-a-love-supreme-live-in-seattle-review-a-unique-record-from-a-historic-band-music/ https://medfordjazz.org/john-coltrane-a-love-supreme-live-in-seattle-review-a-unique-record-from-a-historic-band-music/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/john-coltrane-a-love-supreme-live-in-seattle-review-a-unique-record-from-a-historic-band-music/ WWhether you listen to the most intimate revelations of a soul mate or a stranger, the nuances of sound can convey as much as words, sometimes much more. The instantly identifiable, voice-like timbre of John Coltrane’s saxophone playing made him one of the most beloved artists in jazz – and in the last years of […]]]>

WWhether you listen to the most intimate revelations of a soul mate or a stranger, the nuances of sound can convey as much as words, sometimes much more. The instantly identifiable, voice-like timbre of John Coltrane’s saxophone playing made him one of the most beloved artists in jazz – and in the last years of his short life he also gradually engulfed the models. more conventional narrative height and structure of his work. Coltrane’s non-denominational religious album A Love Supreme was one of the few best-selling jazz hits, but between that late ’64s studio session with his classical quartet (pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones) and that unreleased live recording from the following October, restless Coltrane had begun to let go of familiar cards.

A Love Supreme Live In Seattle album cover

A month earlier, Coltrane had hired saxophonist Pharoah Sanders (a 24-year-old developing the master’s own techniques to imitate saxophone chants, protests, and screams), a second bass player, Donald Rafael Garrett, and was looking for a role. more important for percussion. – changes that would soon disrupt his long relationship with Tyner and Jones. On this longtime amateur recording made at the Penthouse club in Seattle on October 2, 1965, an opening improvised bass duet immediately emphasizes a looser take on the Coltrane ensemble before the famous four-note hook d ‘A Love Supreme does begin to unfold in ever-changing tones.

Coltrane’s high-pitched, rolling theme statements and repeated whooping cough figures interchange with the shrill cries and ferocious growls of Sanders, the serpentine resolve receives flame-throwing horn practice, the bass duet interludes bring periodic tranquility, and the atonal figures of Sanders and a molten Tyner solo dominate the 15-minute chase before the leader’s magnificent tenor-saxophone soliloquy steals the show on the closing psalm. Elvin Jones’ elementary musculature is thunderous in the mix, and Tyner often looks like the man heading for the exit that he quickly turned out to be – but this is a single document of a group. history of the 20th century at a pivotal moment.

Also released this month

Italian jazz trumpeter and bugle Enrico Rava celebrates his lively arrival at the age of 80 with Edizione Speciale (ECM), and the group’s mischievous tale of the famous Cuban pop hit Quiz, Quiz, Quiz is a perennial star. David Bowie Blackstar’s sidemen, Donny McCaslin (sax) and Tim Lefebvre (bass) join American jazz singer / songwriter and imaginative keyboardist Rachel Eckroth on The Garden (Rainy Day Records), a texturally synthesized one-off, subtly vocal and instrumentally formidable. And Birmingham piano original Steve Tromans releases a moving solo piano return of personal obscurity full of patient motives, Jarrettish elisions, percussive power, and sometimes headlong glee on The Way: Doctor. Stephen Tromans (FMR).


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Eddies Music Hall of Fame inducts largest class to date https://medfordjazz.org/eddies-music-hall-of-fame-inducts-largest-class-to-date/ https://medfordjazz.org/eddies-music-hall-of-fame-inducts-largest-class-to-date/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 04:37:01 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/eddies-music-hall-of-fame-inducts-largest-class-to-date/ A pair of Mechanicville brothers who led separate WWII-era bands that repeatedly appeared on the music charts, and a North Country musician who toured the United States and recorded numerous albums during a 56-year career, are among those in third class to be inducted into the Capital Region’s Thomas Edison Music Hall of Fame at […]]]>

A pair of Mechanicville brothers who led separate WWII-era bands that repeatedly appeared on the music charts, and a North Country musician who toured the United States and recorded numerous albums during a 56-year career, are among those in third class to be inducted into the Capital Region’s Thomas Edison Music Hall of Fame at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 27 at the Universal Preservation Hall.

The class includes Big Band singers and brothers Bob Eberly and Ray Eberle; country musician Marty Wendell; rock band The Figgs, radio disc jockey Jim Barrett, jazz conductor Skip Parsons, Cuban and African percussionist and educator Eddie Ade Knowles; and the founders of Old Songs Kay (Andy) and Bill Spence.

The ceremony will include live musical performances and tributes to inductees. On the program, artists playing the music of the inductees: Dylan Perillo; Sean Wendell; Brown Liquor Social Club with Chris Dollard and J Yager; and Peter Pashoukos and Greg Greene (from the Perennial group). Tickets are $ 20 in advance, $ 25 on the day of the show.

“This is our largest class to date and brings the total number of inductees to 15,” said Jim Murphy, co-founder and co-producer. “The judges have nominated nearly 100 people and groups since we started the process, so there is no end in sight to celebrating our local music scene as more and more groups and individuals enter. line of account. “

The inductees are:

Bob Eberly – who changed the spelling of his last name Eberle when he started singing professionally – was hired by the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra after winning an amateur hour competition on the Fred Allen radio show and shortly before Tommy Dorsey left the band to form his own band. He stayed with Jimmy Dorsey and in the early 1940s the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra recorded a series of Billboard hits with Eberly and Helen O’Connell. He also recorded the original version of “I’m Glad There Is You” in 1942 for the Dorsey Orchestra which has become a standard in jazz and pop. Bob’s younger brother, Ray eberle, joined the Glen Miller orchestra in 1938, and recorded several hits and songs for this group until 1943. After a brief stint with Gene Krupa’s group, he began a long solo career. From 1940 to 1943, he was a Billboard College Poll finalist for male vocalist; he also appeared in several films in the early 1940s and on several television variety shows in the 1950s and 1960s. The brothers are natives of Mechanicville.
Jim Barrett’s The local music show “Kaleidoscope” enters its 55th year of broadcast this fall. The show was founded in 1967 on the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s university station, WRPI, and then transferred to Albany Broadcasting, then to WVCR-FM and later to WAIX-FM 106.1.
Originally known as Sonic Undertones, figs have recorded 13 studio albums and several EPs, live albums, compilations and singles. The Saratoga-based group has served as the Graham Parker backing band since 1996 and has also toured with Tommy Stinson of The Replacements. Founded in Saratoga Springs in 1987, the original lineup of Mike Gent (guitar), Pete Donnelly (bass) and Guy Lyons (drums / guitar) went to high school together. Pete Hays (drums) then joined the group.
Eddie Ade Knowles was a mainstay of African and Caribbean music in the capital region since he joined Rensselaer Polytechnic in 1977 until his death in 2020; there he served as Dean of Students, Vice President for Student Life, and Professor of Practice in the Arts and Humanities. An accomplished musician with 50 years of performance, residency, workshops and recordings as a percussionist, his artistic interest focused on African, Afro-Cuban and New World music and dance. He was for many years a member of the board of directors and chair of the music program at Troy Music Hall. In 2004, he founded the Ensemble Congeros, a group dedicated to the study and interpretation of Afro-Cuban, African and New World percussions.
native of Albania Pass Parsons and his Skip Parsons Riverboat Jazz Band have been staples of the Capital Region jazz scene since 1956 and have performed with a long list of notables. Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan issued an official proclamation declaring September 7, 2019 “Skip Parsons Riverboat Jazz Band Day”.
In 1977, Kay (Andy) Spence and the late Bill Spence and a few like-minded people organized and created old songs. Inc., a non-profit organization in Voorheesville dedicated to maintaining traditional music and dance by presenting festivals, concerts, dances and educational programs. Bill, who died in 2019, was a prolific photographer and musician, sound engineer and owner of the Front Hall music label. He formed a skiffle group while in high school in Iowa City, Iowa, and performed for community organizations and dances. He later discovers the hammered dulcimer which soon leads him to form a string orchestra.
native of Ticonderoga Marty wendell, while in college, met a New York arts agent who introduced him to Johnny Cash. In the mid-1960s, he ventured into New York’s Greenwich Village with his guitar and was discovered by a producer; a subsequent recording session resulted in her debut album “Hey, Hey Mama”, which sold over 10,000 copies. In August 1968, thanks to this song, he was engaged in opening act for Johnny Cash and his troupe which included The Carter Family, Carl Perkins and the Statler Brothers. Marty has been touring and recording ever since.

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