Jazz music – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 10:11:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz music – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 Jazz Specialist New Soil Announces Three New Partnerships | Labels https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-specialist-new-soil-announces-three-new-partnerships-labels/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 09:36:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-specialist-new-soil-announces-three-new-partnerships-labels/ Jazz-focused label services and artist management team New Soil announced three new partnerships, with Mushroom Half Hour, Bridge The Gap and Women In Jazz. As part of its new partnership with South African label Mushroom Half Hour, New Soil will co-release drummer Tumi Mogorosi’s new album, Group Theory: Black Music. The company has also partnered […]]]>

Jazz-focused label services and artist management team New Soil announced three new partnerships, with Mushroom Half Hour, Bridge The Gap and Women In Jazz.

As part of its new partnership with South African label Mushroom Half Hour, New Soil will co-release drummer Tumi Mogorosi’s new album, Group Theory: Black Music.

The company has also partnered with talent incubator Bridge The Gap to co-publish the music of three rising stars of the UK jazz scene: Jackson Mathod, Raffy Bushman and James Copus.

Finally, New Soil has entered into a formal partnership with Women In Jazz, a hub in the growth and support of UK talent, which will allow both parties to develop a label offering.

New Soil was founded by former Sony executive Fred Bolza (pictured) and is part of the Marathon Music Group.

Since its launch two years ago, it has released two albums by members of the London jazz scene: Intra-I by Theon Cross and Liminal Space by Ill Considered, the latter backed by a campaign to launch the entire catalog of the digital services group. Additionally, he has worked with concert promoter Church of Sound to build a label offering that, from 2023, will make highlights from his music archive available.

He also signed two new artists: Tyroneisaacstuart and Matters Unknown, Jonny Enser’s debut project of Nubiyan Twist, both of which will be releasing music this year. Additionally, Binker Golding has joined Theon Cross on New Soil’s management roster.

Fred Bolza, Managing Director and Co-Founder of New Soil, said, “Over the coming months, New Soil will continue to explore ways to develop meaningful relationships with anyone committed to nurturing and growing the music ecosystem. and to jointly tend to its fruits so that it may continue to prosper for many years to come.

Paul-René Albertini, President and CEO of Marathon Music Group, added: “We are very grateful to work with inspiring artists and entrepreneurs through our New Soil imprint. It’s been an exciting journey so far and we can’t wait to see what lies ahead.

For more stories like this, and to keep up to date with all our cutting-edge news, features and analysis, sign up to receive our daily Morning News Bulletin

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Bay Area Summer Events 8/12 https://medfordjazz.org/bay-area-summer-events-8-12/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 23:58:41 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/bay-area-summer-events-8-12/ Travel back in time this weekend, to the Summer of Love in San Francisco at the Jerry Day concert or to the 1940s at a WWII living history event and swing dance in San Jose. Or stay in the present with the San Jose Jazz Summerfest in San Jose or a choice of chocolate and […]]]>

Travel back in time this weekend, to the Summer of Love in San Francisco at the Jerry Day concert or to the 1940s at a WWII living history event and swing dance in San Jose. Or stay in the present with the San Jose Jazz Summerfest in San Jose or a choice of chocolate and chalk art in Berkeley or the Laurel World Music Festival in Oakland. Read on for more details.

Always check event details, weather forecasts and safety guidelines. Submit event tips at hoodline.com/tips/.

Free Jerry Day Concert in San Francisco

Relive the days when going to San Francisco meant wearing flowers in your hair, not AirPods in your ears, at the 20th anniversary (wow!) of Jerry Day Saturday, the free concert celebrating the San Francisco native and founding member of the Grateful Dead, Jerry Garcia. Live bands will perform classic Dead songs and Dead-inspired music in the amphitheater named after the legendary musician from his childhood neighborhood, the Excelsior. (Parking will be limited; keep driving, but consider public transport to get to the show.)

And that’s just the beginning. Jerry Day will be followed by Jerry Night, not to mention a pre-party Friday. Get details about the show and related events at www.jerryday.org/events.

When: Saturday August 13; doors open at 11 a.m.
Where: Jerry Garcia Amphitheater, McLaren Park, 40 John F Shelley Drive, San Francisco
Information: www.jerryday.org

Oakland Laurel Street Fair World Music Festival

This long-running street fair is finally back from pandemic hiatus for its 21st episode, promising plenty of fun for all ages. There will be live entertainment on two stages, a dance floor, children’s carnival, craft beer garden, barbecue tasting and plenty of food, retail, artisan and purpose vendors. non-profit. It draws around 15,000 attendees on MacArthur Boulevard in Oakland, so parking can get tricky. Consider public transit instead: nearby options include AC Transit lines 14, 54, 57, and NL, and the fair is about two miles from the Fruitvale BART station.

The fair is free, but all guests who register via EventBrite will be entered to win prizes like t-shirts, commemorative glasses or a case of Tequila Blanco tequila (provided you are over 21).

When: Saturday, August 13, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Where: 35th Avenue and MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland
Information: www.laureldistrictassociation.org/info

San Jose Summer Jazz Festival

The San Jose Jazz Summer Fest returns for its 32nd festival season this weekend with nearly 100 acts over three days on 12 stages in and around César Chavez’ Plaza Park in downtown San Jose. Programming includes a mix of genres ranging from jazz, funk, R&B, Latin, soul, hip-hop, blues, swing, zydeco and world music. A day pass to the Main Stage and other outdoor stages is just $35 ($10 for kids ages 5-12), and tickets go up from there. you can get a three-day adult pass for all stages for $150.

When: Friday August 12 to Sunday August 14
Where: Plaza de César Chavez Park, San José
Information: summerfest.sanjosejazz.org

Berkeley Chocolate and Chalk Art Festival

At this beautiful event, attendees are assigned a sidewalk area along Shattuck in North Berkeley to decorate with their own chalk art. This year’s theme is “Chalking Beautiful Music”. Families or groups can work together, or artists can work alone. When you need a break from creating (or admiring) art, you can indulge in chocolate tastings for $1/ticket (available at event booths at 1451, 1495, or 1601 Shattuck Ave. on day of the event or in advance on EventBrite). You’ll also find crafts, food trucks, beer, wine, jazz musicians, jugglers and dancers along the blocks between Rose and Vine streets.

There will be a chalk art contest for the best drawing after 4 p.m. The top three winners will receive cash prizes ($150/$100/$50), while the 10 runners-up will receive $25 gift certificates to Books, Inc. Pre-register on Eventbrite or register online. no one on Saturday at the event booths at Shattuck & Vine or Shattuck & Cedar, where you can pick up boxes of artists’ chalk if you need them: $10 cash for 24 pieces or $20 for 48 pieces.

When: Saturday, August 13, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: Shattuck Ave. between Rose and Vine streets, Berkeley
Information: www.anotherbullwinkelshow.com/chocolate-chalk-art/

Spirit of ’45: Living History Day and Swing Dance Party in San Jose

San Jose’s 14-acre historic park will be transported back to the 1940s on Saturday with an event capturing the experience of war and the home front of World War II. There will be vintage music, a vintage car display, a WWII tent city, a 1945-style victory parade, exhibits and interactive activities for all ages, children’s games and 1940s food trucks – all followed by a grand 18-piece orchestra concert and swing dancing in the evening. Period attire is encouraged.

General admission to the event plus swing dancing is $25; Admission just to the main event is $10 for general admission, $8 for seniors, $5 for children ages 6-11 (under 6s are free), and free for veterans from World War II, Rosies and active duty military; just the swing dance is $20 for general admission.

When: Saturday, August 13, Living History Day from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Big Band Concert & Swing Dance 7pm-10pm
Where: 635 Phelan Avenue, San Jose
Information: storiesanjose.org

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The 2022 Jazz Association Benefit Gala raises over $700,000 in a spirited musical evening The 2022 Jazz Association Benefit Gala (JASS) raises over $700,000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-2022-jazz-association-benefit-gala-raises-over-700000-in-a-spirited-musical-evening-the-2022-jazz-association-benefit-gala-jass-raises-over-700000/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 00:49:27 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/the-2022-jazz-association-benefit-gala-raises-over-700000-in-a-spirited-musical-evening-the-2022-jazz-association-benefit-gala-jass-raises-over-700000/ Nathan Hartono, Jeremy Monteiro and Joanna Dong What happens when two of the country’s biggest jazz and pop stars take the stage together? You have a party on your hands. You are also well aware of the phenomenal talent that abounds on Singapore’s shores. That’s exactly what happened when Nathan Hartono and Joanna Dong juggled […]]]>
Nathan Hartono, Jeremy Monteiro and Joanna Dong

What happens when two of the country’s biggest jazz and pop stars take the stage together? You have a party on your hands. You are also well aware of the phenomenal talent that abounds on Singapore’s shores. That’s exactly what happened when Nathan Hartono and Joanna Dong juggled emcee duties with a compelling set of jazz standards at the recent 2022 Jazz Association (JASS) Benefit Gala.

Held at the Shangri-La Singapore, the duo, alongside swing king Jeremy Monteiro and orchestras from the Jazz Association Singapore, serenaded some 500 donors, sponsors and supporters with Sinatra’s Night and day, it had to be you, come fly with meand Dong’s now signature rendition of Wo Yao Ni De Ai.

The first full-fledged in-person gala hosted by an arts company in Singapore since the easing of Covid-19 restrictions, the JASS Benefit Gala 2022 was a triple celebration of Monteiro’s 45th career anniversary, the legend’s 121st birthday jazz Louis Armstrong, and the 6th anniversary of the Jazz Association (Singapore).

(Related: Nathan Hartono Returns to Jazz Roots for a Special Concert with Jeremy Monteiro)

Honored by Indranee Rajah, a minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, and well attended by Singaporean high society as well as members of the diplomatic corps, the gala raised more than $700,000 this year. The annual benefit raises funds to support its mission of fostering excellence in jazz and making Singapore a city of jazz.

“Our JASS journey has only just begun,” said Monteiro, Executive Director and Music Director of JASS. “To date, we have supported nine scholars in their jazz studies in Singapore and abroad. We are also continuing our work to support eligible jazz musicians affected by the crisis through the JASS Crisis Fund.

“Looking forward, JASS will strengthen our community outreach, ensuring that jazz continues to be inclusive and reaches people of all ages. This will be done through partnerships, for example ART:DIS (formerly known as the name of Very Special Arts). We also want to catalyze symphonic jazz by bringing together jazz musicians and classical musicians. In this way, not only do we bring the musical community together, we also bring together the community and lovers of orchestral music and of jazz within this new enlarged space.

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A Jazzman’s Blues, Jazz Music Inspirat – Deadline https://medfordjazz.org/a-jazzmans-blues-jazz-music-inspirat-deadline/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 20:43:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/a-jazzmans-blues-jazz-music-inspirat-deadline/ I sat in the Green Room waiting for actor and director Tyler Perry to arrive backstage at the Martha’s Vineyard Performing Arts Center for the Colors of Conversation event during the Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Festival. Before hitting the stage for the panel, there was only a short window to interview him about his […]]]>

I sat in the Green Room waiting for actor and director Tyler Perry to arrive backstage at the Martha’s Vineyard Performing Arts Center for the Colors of Conversation event during the Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Festival. Before hitting the stage for the panel, there was only a short window to interview him about his new project, A Jazz bluesa screenplay he had written in the 1990s.

Many know him from the Medea movies, which some say has limited his cinematic reach in terms of what he can do, but Perry is here to prove the naysayers wrong. “Filming was like, ‘I know something you don’t know,'” he said. “Throughout my career people would say Madea is all I can do. Today, 26 years later, I have Jazz blues.”

It was an idea he couldn’t get rid of. Imagine what it’s like to latch on to an idea and finally be able to execute said idea all these years later. According to Pretty, right now is the best time to present her story to the world. “Right now in America, t1=here’s an assault on our history. I feel wonderful to be able to do this now.

Jazz blues follows Bayou (Joshua Boone), a vocalist from the Deep South who falls in love with Leanne (Solea Pfeiffer) and follows the band through forty years of secrets and lies. The director pulled out all the stops, hiring legendary dancer/actress Debbie Allen to choreograph and Terrance Blanchard to arrange and produce the music. When depicting the main character’s emotional trajectory from the beginning to the end of the film, the director was very passionate about displaying all the hardships and emotions that come with being a black man in the Deep South.

“[Bayou] The entire arc is about the emotions, love, anger, and frustration that most of us carry through life at one point or another. Joshua Boone does an amazing job delivering a solid performance. Watching him be able to express all these different emotions and come to this sort of reunion is extremely powerful to watch.

Perry grew up in the Deep South, in rural Louisiana, where jazz was an influence on him. This experience gave him a special connection with matter. “Jazz was really the soundtrack to my life,” he said. Many stalwarts of the musical genre who inspired his upbringing have music featured in the film. Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn, Duke Ellington and all these incredible voices inspire me.

As our time together drew to a close, I had to ask Perry if he was planning on working on any other projects. The blues of a jazzman exists outside of the Medeaverse and everything it has done so far. However, he understands that his recent filmography should not be ignored, as it has helped him get to where he is. “The Madea films were for my target, my audience. I made sure to serve the niche, which put me in a position where I could make time to write and perform other stories.

As I pressed him a bit more on what we can expect from the future Tyler Perry, you’d be surprised what he’s up to. “The next film I have just written is a film about the Second World War. I will play with space and bigger sets for sure.

There is no release date for The blues of a jazzman (which will be broadcast on Netflix). Additionally, there are no specific details about the WWII film yet. However, he announced at the Colors of Conversation event that the film would debut at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2022.

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Free summer concerts stream music across the peninsula https://medfordjazz.org/free-summer-concerts-stream-music-across-the-peninsula/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/free-summer-concerts-stream-music-across-the-peninsula/ Free outdoor summer concerts are scheduled for next week on the northern Olympic Peninsula. Concerts are Tuesdays in Sequim, Wednesdays in Port Angeles and Thursdays in Port Townsend. Guests are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets as well as picnics. Ranger and the “Re-Arrangers” will perform gypsy jazz on Tuesday at Sequim’s Music in the […]]]>

Free outdoor summer concerts are scheduled for next week on the northern Olympic Peninsula.

Concerts are Tuesdays in Sequim, Wednesdays in Port Angeles and Thursdays in Port Townsend. Guests are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets as well as picnics.

Ranger and the “Re-Arrangers” will perform gypsy jazz on Tuesday at Sequim’s Music in the Park at the James Center for the Performing Arts at Carrie Blake Community Park, 500 N. Blake Ave.

The concerts take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. from Tuesday to August 30 at the center. They are co-sponsored by the City of Sequim and the City’s Arts Advisory Board with Sequim Community Broadcasting/KSQM Radio!

At 6 p.m. Wednesday, the Bread and Gravy Quintet will perform at the Port Angeles Concerts on the City Pier at Lincoln Street and Railroad Avenue. The Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts will host the concerts until August 31.

In addition to the festivities this summer, a beer and wine garden.

Sponsors are Erika Ralston Word of Windermere Real Estate, DA Davidson, Elwha River Casino, the Washington State Department of Commerce and the Peninsula Daily News.

Kilcid Band will play psych-pop at the Port Townsend concerts on the quayside at Pope Marine Plaza on Thursday. The room opens at 4:30 p.m. and the music will be played live from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

A beer, wine and cider garden showcasing local beers is planned and a variety of vendors will participate. Port Townsend Main Street and Homer Smith Insurance will host the concerts until August 25.

Other sponsors include Windermere Real Estate, Peninsula Hearing, SYSCO Foods, Aldrich’s Market, James A. Doros Law Firm, The Kellogg Building and the City of Port Townsend. The media sponsors are KPTZ 91.9 FM and the PDN.

Here are the schedules for the rest of the summer.

Concerts in the park

• August 16 — Navy Band NW Wind Ensemble/Concert Band.

• August 23 — Black Diamond Junction, who were voted Best Live Band of PDN 2016-2021.

• August 30 — Expert advice, Motown, soul and rock.

To learn more, see visitssunnysequim.com/202/Concerts.

Concerts on the pier

• August 13 — Chandra Johnson and the Homeschool Boys, non-traditional bluegrass and country.

• August 24 — Honey of the Heart, music influenced by folk, soul, jazz and world/flamenco styles.

• August 31 — Black Diamond Junction.

To know more, jffa.org.

Concerts on the quay

• August 18 — Backwoods Hucksters.

• August 25 — Kevin Mason and the PT All Stars, soul, rhythm and blues, rock.

For this grand finale, the music will continue with a Late Night DJ Party from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Cotton Building, 607 Water St.

To learn more, see ptmainstreet.org.



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Houstonians are reclaiming the city’s jazz history by putting on shows. Here are some top picks https://medfordjazz.org/houstonians-are-reclaiming-the-citys-jazz-history-by-putting-on-shows-here-are-some-top-picks/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:25:44 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/houstonians-are-reclaiming-the-citys-jazz-history-by-putting-on-shows-here-are-some-top-picks/ Joshua RedmanPhoto: Wilkins Management Earlier this year, trombonist Vincent Gardner and his wife, singer Belinda Munro, discussed the educational and outreach organization Jazz Houston before a concert they hosted featuring the music of Duke Ellington. “We haven’t even begun to scratch the surface of what we’d like to do,” Gardner said. Next month, they’ll continue […]]]>

Joshua RedmanPhoto: Wilkins Management

Earlier this year, trombonist Vincent Gardner and his wife, singer Belinda Munro, discussed the educational and outreach organization Jazz Houston before a concert they hosted featuring the music of Duke Ellington.

“We haven’t even begun to scratch the surface of what we’d like to do,” Gardner said.

Next month, they’ll continue to scratch the surface with the Bayou City Jazz Celebration, a celebratory gathering that honors Houston’s jazz past and present. Munro will sing works associated with Houston’s Anita Moore, a singer who sang with Ellington in her later years. Gardner, the organization’s artistic director, and Munro will be joined by the Jazz Houston Orchestra as well as pianist Helen Sung, a successful New York-based pianist who is also an alumnus of the High School for the Performing and Visual. Houston Arts.

READ MORE: NEW VENUE, FESTIVAL REVIVES INTEREST IN JAZZ IN HOUSTON

More information

Da Camera presents SummerJazz 2022
With Joshua Redman, Pedrito Martinez, Jazzmeia Horn and Jalen Baker
When: August 19-21
Where: Cullen Theater and Market Square Park
Details: for venues and tickets, visit dacamera.com

The Houston Jazz Festival with Nellie McKay and the Cookers
When: 8 p.m. September 17
Where: Miller Outdoor Theater, 6000 Hermann Park Drive
Details: free; information on reserved seats on milleroutdoortheatre.com

Bayou City Jazz Celebration presented by Jazz Houston
When: 8 p.m. September 24
Where: Miller Outdoor Theater, 6000 Hermann Park Drive
Details: free; information on reserved seats on milleroutdoortheatre.com

This event is just one of many jazz shows and festivals taking place as summer slowly creeps its way out this year. The next few weeks offer paid and free shows, indoors and outdoors, featuring local talent and out-of-towners.

Miller Outdoor Theater hosts several of the shows, which guarantees top performers a free admission price tailored to the audience. Trumpeter Humberto Ramírez and saxophonist Tia Fuller share a bill Aug. 12 at The Miller.

A week later, the first big event: Da Camera’s Summer Jazz 2022 takes place from August 19 to 21. The event kicks off on August 19 with a free performance by fellow HSPVA alumnus, Jalen Baker, a rising star and dazzling vibraphonist. He put on a free show in Market Square shortly before Dallas jazz singer Jazzmeia Horn took the stage at the Wortham Theater Center for a paid performance. Summer Jazz this weekend also includes two performances – one free, one not – from Pedrito Martinez and Joshua Redman.

Redman’s show will mix past and present. Joshua Redman 3×3 reunites with the star saxophonist in a trio format with drummer Marcus Gilmore and bassist Larry Grenadier feeling the shining corners created by three iconic composers whose work has spanned over a century: Ellington, Thelonious Monk and Wayne Shorter. Redman enjoyed immersing himself in their work.

“I loved all of their music at first, and I was drawn to the music on an emotional level, a spiritual level,” Redman said. “And also on a very personal level. Their music was so fundamental to the language of anyone who was serious about playing jazz. But it’s kind of functional listening, like doing homework. It’s been nice to come back to music “Usually we call a few songs, play the songs and rediscover them every night. Maybe it’s not like a “return to innocence” or something like that. But I liked m Engage with music where it’s less of a mission or a project. It’s more of just a joy.”

The Houston Jazz Collective is bringing back its Houston Jazz Festival, which takes place September 17, also at the Miller Outdoor Theater. This year’s event features Nellie McKay, who for two decades has found her own space with a tongue-in-cheek mix of jazz and vocal pop music. She opens for the Cookers, a sharp set of seven players whose combined list of credits dating back to the 1960s is too formidable and too long to include here. But noteworthy: The Cookers include saxophonist Billy Harper, a Houston native who studied at the University of North Texas before joining Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers in 1968.

Cumulatively, the shows capture a city with a long jazz tradition that doesn’t always get the attention it deserves.

Gardner and Munro came to Houston specifically to operate Jazz Houston. Their arrival, however, came at an inopportune time: they arrived in the city two months before Hurricane Harvey plunged much of the city under water.

“But we really got to see the spirit of the city and how it responded to the crisis,” Munro said. “It was a tough time, but it only strengthened our resolve to do something here.”

They scheduled a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald in late 2017. Jazz Houston continues to reach out to the community with concerts and also educational initiatives and a youth orchestra.

“Things look better, but it still feels a bit unfed,” Gardner said. “We are doing our part to try to change that. There are great jazz musicians coming out of Houston: a who’s who of jazz. So our goal is to feature these artists here and reveal the life and long history of Houston. And it is an extraordinary story.





  • Andrew Dansby

    Andrew Dansby covers culture and entertainment, both local and national, for the Houston Chronicle. He came to The Chronicle in 2004 from Rolling Stone, where he spent five years writing about music. He had previously spent five years in book publishing, working with publisher George RR Martin on the first two books in the series that would become “Game of Thrones” on television. photos you’ve never seen. He has written for Rolling Stone, American Songwriter, Texas Music, Playboy and other publications.

    Andrew dislikes monkeys, dolphins, and the outdoors.

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New Music Norwell’s Totem; The Salem Witches inspire Lauren Henderson https://medfordjazz.org/new-music-norwells-totem-the-salem-witches-inspire-lauren-henderson/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 07:00:15 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/new-music-norwells-totem-the-salem-witches-inspire-lauren-henderson/ Jay N. Miller This week, we take a look at two local artists who have taken their music in new directions. Jazz singer Lauren Henderson explores Latin and South American music in a collection of originals and standards based on the theme of female empowerment. Hard-rockers Norwell Totem, meanwhile, deliver a cathartic album that’s mostly […]]]>

Jay N. Miller

This week, we take a look at two local artists who have taken their music in new directions. Jazz singer Lauren Henderson explores Latin and South American music in a collection of originals and standards based on the theme of female empowerment. Hard-rockers Norwell Totem, meanwhile, deliver a cathartic album that’s mostly composed of softer, acoustic-focused melodies detailing loss and its aftermath.

Lauren Henderson

Salem Witches Inspire New Songs

Marblehead native Lauren Henderson always notes when she first meets people that her hometown is right next to Salem, which inspired her new album, “La Bruja.”

“Everyone always knows Salem, and usually they say, ‘Oh, witches! ‘” Henderson said. “I have always been proud to be from this region, but what happened to these women is well known. And we all wonder, what could they have done to deserve to be executed…? That was the start of this album, wanting to explore some of those things, the role of women in society, and also paying homage to beautiful songs from Central and South America. I have ancestry in Montserrat and in Panama – my grandfather was there when they built the canal – and I wanted to make a record that celebrates that.

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Santa Cruz Mountain Jam raises funds for youth music program – The Mercury News https://medfordjazz.org/santa-cruz-mountain-jam-raises-funds-for-youth-music-program-the-mercury-news/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 13:42:47 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/santa-cruz-mountain-jam-raises-funds-for-youth-music-program-the-mercury-news/ An outdoor concert in the Santa Cruz Mountains is designed to help local students find their jam, musically speaking. The no-entry Santa Cruz Mountain Jam is scheduled for August 20, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Loma Prieta Playground and Lookout, located at 23845 Summit Road in Los Gatos. Proceeds from a silent […]]]>

An outdoor concert in the Santa Cruz Mountains is designed to help local students find their jam, musically speaking.

The no-entry Santa Cruz Mountain Jam is scheduled for August 20, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Loma Prieta Playground and Lookout, located at 23845 Summit Road in Los Gatos. Proceeds from a silent auction and concessions at the event will benefit the Loma Prieta and CT English Middle elementary school music programs and fund scholarships for students who wish to pursue a musical education.

“It’s a great way to build self-esteem in young people and a creative outlet,” said concert organizer Louis Niemann.

The Niemann family produced the first Mountain Jam in 2013. After a two-year hiatus in the pandemic era, the event is back this year with a lineup of five musical acts.

“For us, it’s kind of a way to pay back the community,” Niemann said. “We just want to have a really fun music event that everyone can enjoy. It’s free, so you can listen to all those great local bands and have a really budget-friendly experience.

The gig kicks off with Los Gatos favorite The Summit Sisters and new neo-soul jazz fusion band EDYN.

The Joint Chiefs will perform their funk, acid jazz and classic R&B, and the Santa Cruz-based Anthony Arya Band will bring rock, folk and blues. Alex Lucero and the Live Again Band will headline the show, performing a range of soul, funk, jazz and Americana.

Niemann said Mountain Jam is a “team effort” with lots of community support.

Items up for sale at the silent auction include cases of wine from local wineries, a painting by local artist Gordon Smith, reservations at vacation homes and a reservation for bands from the lineup to play at shows. an event of your choice.

Local star chef Matt McNamara, behind the vegetarian gourmet restaurant Pretty Good Advice, will serve vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes to customers.

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Barbara Thompson obituary | Jazz https://medfordjazz.org/barbara-thompson-obituary-jazz/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 09:53:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/barbara-thompson-obituary-jazz/ The vibrant history of fluid, cross-cultural musical innovation of the early 21st century now takes for granted the contributions of a growing cohort of powerful saxophonists. But not so long ago, a woman was a striking rarity on an instrument whose evolution in modern music, from the 1920s onwards, had been carried almost exclusively by […]]]>

The vibrant history of fluid, cross-cultural musical innovation of the early 21st century now takes for granted the contributions of a growing cohort of powerful saxophonists. But not so long ago, a woman was a striking rarity on an instrument whose evolution in modern music, from the 1920s onwards, had been carried almost exclusively by men. Barbara Thompson, who died at the age of 77 from Parkinson’s disease, was one of the most inspiring exceptions.

Thompson’s formidable instrumental skills included a tenor saxophone voice that could range from the sultry lyricism of Coleman Hawkins or Stan Getz to the power of John Coltrane’s rambunctious soliloquies; agile mastery of bebop on alto sax; and a soft to abstract tonal range on the flute. As a prolific composer, she has written classical concertos and choral works, television themes (including A touch of frost) and decorations for poetry. She made friends and fans all over Europe (especially in Germany) and across generations. Composer and trumpeter Yazz Ahmed, as part of her Polyhymnia project for International Women’s Day in 2015, composed a suite simply titled Barbaric as a tribute to the work and influence of its formidable elder.

Barbara was born in Oxford, to Dick Thompson, later clerk of the court of criminal appeal, and Joan (née Gracey), who had been a student at Oxford University before their marriage. The child was raised in London, first at Lincoln’s Inn Fields and then in Notting Hill, where she attended Fox Primary School and learned to play the recorder. Her parents separated when Barbara was six years old, and her refuge from loss and conflict was to study the finer details of musical creation for hours on end.

At Queen’s College, Harley Street (1955-62), she learned clarinet and piano, and played for five years in the London Schools Symphony Orchestra. Then she spent a season with the Ivy Benson All Girl Band, after learning the alto saxophone by hearing Johnny Hodges play with Duke Ellington. At the Royal College of Music (1962-65), she studied flute, piano, clarinet and composition while taking private lessons in saxophone.

In 1965 Thompson joined the New Jazz Orchestra (NJO), an adventurous big band led by Neil Ardley, and formed the previous year at the Green Man pub in Blackheath. Her jazz experience was still limited, but she learned quickly and enthusiastically, especially through exposure to new music by such original local composers as Ardley, Michael Gibbs and Michael Garrick. Thompson and NJO drummer Jon Hiseman began a relationship that grew into a marriage in 1967.

Thompson’s career gained momentum, both as a composer (her first published piece, for flute and piano, was written while she was still in college) and as a freelancer. Between 1967 and 1971, she played in the all-female band She Trinity (playing beefy baritone sax with them as the opening act for some The Who gigs), co-led a quintet with saxophonist Art Themen, and worked with John Dankworth. and Cleo Laine, Gibbs and Don Rendell. In 1972, Thompson formed the genre group Paraphernalia, with Hiseman joining later in the decade – changing incarnations of the group would continue as a vehicle for her to compose for the next 40 years.

Thompson played saxophones and flute alongside Hiseman’s jazz-rock quintet Colosseum on Andrew Lloyd Webber’s 1978 classic crossover album Variations, and she later collaborated with Lloyd Webber on the musicals Cats and Starlight Express. From 1973 to 1980, she led Jubiaba, a group of nine Latin jazz musicians, and in the late 1980s, she launched the big band Moving Parts. During these years she was also a regular member of the International United Jazz and Rock Ensemble, a powerful ensemble with a European audience and a line-up including British trumpeters Ian Carr and Kenny Wheeler, German trombonist Albert Mangelsdorff and the Le American sax player Charlie Mariano.

In 1992, to mark the Year of the European Union, Thompson formed the all-acoustic sextet Sans Frontiers, which featured Italian trumpet star Enrico Rava and Polish violinist Michael Urbaniak.

She was made an MBE in 1996. The following year, following concerns about her fingering, she was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. She continued to work, tour and record for the next four years, but was eventually forced to retire from active performance. In 2001, she told the Observer jazz writer Dave Gelly that, although the drugs could probably get her through a few more years: “I won’t play below my best”.

Barbara Thompson in 1967, when it was extremely rare for a woman to play the saxophone Photography: Norman Potter/Getty Images

But the meds got better, and Thompson returned to the stage for a 2003 tour with Colosseum and for Paraphernalia concerts in Europe in 2005, recorded as Paraphernalia Live ’05. In 2007, she and Hiseman released the studio album Never Say Goodbye. By the end of the decade, Thompson was working on a piano concerto, the four-movement suite Quantum Leaps for flautist Shona Brown and the single-movement Perpetual Motion, for a 12-piece saxophone ensemble, and more. A BBC documentary directed by Mike Dibb, Play against timea sensitive study five years in the making and published in 2011, depicted Thompson’s artistic and physical battles.

Thompson contributed to Colosseum’s swan song album, Time on Our Side, and toured with the band again in 2015. She completed work on Paraphernalia’s eclectic final album, The Last Fandango, with the ‘Apollo Saxophone Quartet and guest Shona Brown, and his own lyrically shapely and muse of narrative improvisation on soprano and tenor saxophones.

In 2018, Hiseman died after surgery to remove a brain tumor. Thompson witnessed a heartfelt celebration of the couple’s accomplishments at Shepherd’s Bush Empire the following year, featuring members of Paraphernalia and Colosseum, and their daughter, Anna (singer-songwriter Ana Gracey). The National Youth Jazz Orchestra’s collaboration with the other active Paraphernalia players on 10 Thompson Originals was released in 2021 as the studio album Bulletproof.

Thompson is survived by his children, Marcus and Anna, and two siblings, Hugh and Jane.

Barbara Gracey Thompson, saxophonist and composer, born July 27, 1944; passed away on July 9, 2022

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UC Davis Political Violence Survey | CA Firearms Legislation | A conversation with Spencer Day https://medfordjazz.org/uc-davis-political-violence-survey-ca-firearms-legislation-a-conversation-with-spencer-day/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 17:03:23 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/uc-davis-political-violence-survey-ca-firearms-legislation-a-conversation-with-spencer-day/ Update requiredTo play audio, update the browser or Flash plugin. Governor Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference as he is joined by California Attorney General Rob Bonta, left, and State Senator Bob Hertzberg Friday, July 22, 2022. Newsom signed a gun control law on Friday. AP Photo/Jae C. Hong Updated at 9:43 […]]]>

Governor Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference as he is joined by California Attorney General Rob Bonta, left, and State Senator Bob Hertzberg Friday, July 22, 2022. Newsom signed a gun control law on Friday.

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong


Updated at 9:43 a.m.

Governor Newsom signs new gun bills. The UC Davis national survey reveals an alarming trend of political violence. Sacramento Republic FC hosts the US Open Cup semi-final match.

UC Davis Political Violence Survey

Current conditions in the United States compromise its future as a free and democratic society. That’s the key finding of a nationwide survey conducted by researchers from UC Davis’ Violence Prevention Research Program. The survey, which has not yet been peer-reviewed (meaning it has not yet been evaluated by the medical community), suggests an alarming trend of political violence across the country and is the first of its kind to assess people’s willingness to participate in violent political acts. The research also reveals a growing level of distrust in American democracy and its institutions. Half of those who responded believe that the country will soon experience another civil war. While some of these conclusions seem grim, others lay the groundwork for hope. A large majority of those who responded said they reject political violence entirely or are unwilling to resort to violence themselves. To go beyond the headlines and better understand what this research means, Insight spoke to dr. Garen Wintermutcalifornia manager Gun Violence Research Center and Violence Prevention Program at UC Davis.


Firearms legislation

It’s a first of its kind, it’s controversial, and even Governor Newsom thinks the new gun control law he signed will likely end up in the Supreme Court. Gun rights advocates call the new law a cheap political gimmick, and even the ACLU isn’t happy with it. The new law is almost a “copy and paste” of Texas’ recent abortion law, which allows citizens to report and prosecute violators. Newsom’s gun control law, which was signed at Santa Monica College, the site of a 2013 mass shooting that left six people dead, will allow Californians to sue anyone who sells or manufactures guns illegal, including assault rifles. If the plaintiff wins in court, the state will pay him up to $10,000 per offense and per weapon. The law also applies to ghost guns and the parts used to make them. This is just the latest in a series of gun-related bills signed by Governor Newsom. CapRadio State Political Journalist Nicole Nixon shed light on this bill and others that will likely all be challenged in court.


Spencer Day

Spencer Day is a critically acclaimed jazz singer who also loves musical theatre. His rich baritone voice wowed audiences in venues large and small. From piano bars in New York to an appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, Spencer Day delivers a consistently uplifting performance. He reinvents classic tunes from Broadway shows in a jazz-flavored setting on his latest album. Cap Radio Jazz Music Director Gary Vercelli spoke with Spencer this spring and started by asking him why he chose this theme.

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