Jazz songs – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 01:50:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png Jazz songs – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 Bitcoin Billionaire Hit Song hits the charts https://medfordjazz.org/bitcoin-billionaire-hit-song-hits-the-charts/ https://medfordjazz.org/bitcoin-billionaire-hit-song-hits-the-charts/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 00:53:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/bitcoin-billionaire-hit-song-hits-the-charts/ LOS ANGELES, Oct. 19, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Back with unerring success, Del Oro Music artist David Longoria has drawn into the depths of his musical career to deliver an effervescent and addictive single titled ‘Billionaire Bitcoin’ . With over 100,000 streams per month on Spotify alone, David has created yet another song that will […]]]>

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 19, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Back with unerring success, Del Oro Music artist David Longoria has drawn into the depths of his musical career to deliver an effervescent and addictive single titled ‘Billionaire Bitcoin’ . With over 100,000 streams per month on Spotify alone, David has created yet another song that will reaffirm his status as a multidimensional artist adored by an ever-changing fan base.

Known for his exquisite trumpet playing, “Bitcoin Billionaire” ensures the continued success of David’s Billboard Chart as it has a humorous hit on crypto traders. Normally migrating between the worlds of jazz and pure pop music, David has produced another song which has its basis in the big band era, but which has been boosted for today’s world.

His voice compliments an elegant arrangement that reaches all heights as he delivers a tongue-in-cheek critique of people who are out of touch with reality. Its horn sound is on a new level, and the sound is a throwback to the glamorous days of yesteryear. “Bitcoin Billionaire” is another example of how David can merge elements from various musical genres and create music that will appeal to people of all walks of life.

Brilliantly orchestrated, humorous, energetic and highly refined, David keeps every promise he has ever made in a career spanning more than two decades. Celebrating life through parody and music, it leads us once again to a world of new musical horizons with fun in the head and music in the soul.

To listen to Bitcoin Billionaire or contact David Longoria, please visit @ Twitter, @ Instagram and finally YouTube for contact information.

For more information, please contact kelly@deloromusic.com.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/54f69a61-cd0b-4462-9c0f-76113c921bdf


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V-State Experience arrives in Jacksonville on Saturday https://medfordjazz.org/v-state-experience-arrives-in-jacksonville-on-saturday/ https://medfordjazz.org/v-state-experience-arrives-in-jacksonville-on-saturday/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 19:48:03 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/v-state-experience-arrives-in-jacksonville-on-saturday/ October 18, 202121-91 Jessica popeCommunications and Media Relations Coordinator Greyson Halligan of Jacksonville, Florida discovered VSU while attending the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts and playing trumpet with the John Lumpkin Institute and the Douglas Anderson Jazz Ensemble II. He plans to earn a Bachelor of Music in Musical Performance, with a specialization in […]]]>

October 18, 2021
21-91

Jessica pope
Communications and Media Relations Coordinator

Greyson Halligan of Jacksonville, Florida discovered VSU while attending the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts and playing trumpet with the John Lumpkin Institute and the Douglas Anderson Jazz Ensemble II. He plans to earn a Bachelor of Music in Musical Performance, with a specialization in Jazz Performance, in the summer of 2022.

greyson-trumpet-one.jpg

VALDOSTA – Valdosta State University brings its V-State experience to Jacksonville, Fla. On Saturday. The fun begins at 4 p.m. at the River Club located at 1 Independent Drive # 3500 – and everyone is welcome to attend.

The State of Valdosta is excited to return to The River City by The Sea and have the opportunity to meet with residents of the Jacksonville area interested in learning more about VSU’s unique education model – a centered model. on individualized mentoring and support. This is the first time VSU has offered this type of in-person experience since before the onset of the ongoing global pandemic.

Admission to the V-State experience is free. Hearty appetizers will be served. Participants will have the chance to win a VSU scholarship and bring home Blazer Nation loot. Customers can register at www.valdosta.edu/vse.

“This is the perfect opportunity to get out and get to know VSU,” said Ryan Hogan, director of admissions.

“We’re excited to talk about our out-of-state tuition waiver for Florida residents; our new Online College for Career Advancement, ideal for non-traditional and active-duty military wishing to earn a college degree; our commitment to experiential learning and helping our students develop the skills necessary to positively impact the communities they call home; the many opportunities for degree holders who wish to continue their studies at graduate level; our national track and field championship; our wide range of academic, service and social organizations; and more.”

Greyson Halligan of Jacksonville discovered VSU while attending the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts and playing trumpet with the John Lumpkin Institute and the Douglas Anderson Jazz Ensemble II. One of his teachers, Don Zentz, is a VSU alumnus.

Halligan graduated from the Douglas Anderson School of the Arts in 2018. He plans to earn a Bachelor of Music in Musical Performance, majoring in Jazz Performance, in the summer of 2022 and join the powerful and positive community of VSU Blazers. who find real happiness and fulfillment in their personal and professional life and use it to empower the people and places closest to them.

VSU: How did you discover your talent / passion for music, and when did you know that was what you wanted to study in college?

Halligan: I started learning trumpet in fifth grade at KIPP in Jacksonville. I then auditioned for the LaVilla School of the Arts as a band and never stopped loving music.

VSU: What are your ultimate career goals?

Halligan: I want to be a freelance musician and composer.

VSU: Talk about your VSU experience.

Halligan: Learning from the faculty here has been an absolute blessing. Mr. David Springfield, Director of Jazz Studies, is a fantastic arranger and conductor, and everyone in the music department works to meet my specific needs. For example, I get two trumpet lessons and one piano lesson every week because I want to focus on both instruments.

VSU: What would you say to residents of the Jacksonville area who might consider attending VSU in the future?

Halligan: Look at the. The perfect college is different for everyone, so think about what you expect from your college education. I chose to go to VSU because it is affordable, only a two hour drive from my home, the teachers are incredibly talented and they tailor the education to the individual – not to mention the campus is beautiful.

VSU offers over 180 academic programs at nine different levels – associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctorate degrees, as well as minor, certificate, certification, and approval. The programs are available online, on campus and through a hybrid format. The new Online College for Career Advancement opened this fall.

On the Web:
www.valdosta.edu/vse


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Na Money completes this video: Don Jazzy reacts as Obi Cubana and his friends take part in the challenge of Ayra Starr Nigeria news https://medfordjazz.org/na-money-completes-this-video-don-jazzy-reacts-as-obi-cubana-and-his-friends-take-part-in-the-challenge-of-ayra-starr-nigeria-news/ https://medfordjazz.org/na-money-completes-this-video-don-jazzy-reacts-as-obi-cubana-and-his-friends-take-part-in-the-challenge-of-ayra-starr-nigeria-news/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 14:46:21 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/na-money-completes-this-video-don-jazzy-reacts-as-obi-cubana-and-his-friends-take-part-in-the-challenge-of-ayra-starr-nigeria-news/ Businessman Obi Cubana and his friends became the latest to take on the Bloody Samaritan challenge Don Jazzy enthusiastically shared the video on his Instagram page while greeting the billionaire and his friends The music producer went on to say that if billionaires had not joined an artist’s challenge, the artist’s fame was not yet […]]]>
  • Businessman Obi Cubana and his friends became the latest to take on the Bloody Samaritan challenge
  • Don Jazzy enthusiastically shared the video on his Instagram page while greeting the billionaire and his friends
  • The music producer went on to say that if billionaires had not joined an artist’s challenge, the artist’s fame was not yet solid.

Don Jazzy is not only proud that his new artist Ayra Starr is making waves, he is also proud of the caliber of people dancing to his song.

The music producer shared a video showing the moment the billionaire businessman, his friend Ned Okonkwo and others were dancing to Starr’s Bloody Samaritan.

Obi Cubana and his friends take on Ayra Starr’s challenge. Photos: @donjazzy
Source: Instagram

Obi and his friends were spotted on an expanse of land as they posed for the camera. As soon as the person who recorded gave them the green light, they started dancing.

Read also

Billionaire Shares: Obi Cubana Wins Entertainment Personality Grand Prize, Electronic Money Honors Occasion

Don Jazzy was excited about the video as he noted that it is full of money.

Do you have a groundbreaking story that you would like us to publish? Please contact us via info@corp.legit.ng!

He wrote:

“Ahhh If the billionaires don’t take your challenge then baby blow your song blow your shout out to the baddest and biggest in real estate @nedokonkwo with lady Doro don dada herself @ceooflagos and the man from the year @obi_cubana. Na full money this video. “

Watch Obi and his friends below:

Nigerians react

teejay_zaddy:

“This jam does not scatter everywhere.”

akaamke

“FAT!”

earring:

Na the words that I like pass. “

joy_nnena25:

“The vibe of this song is everything.”

marin_sofficial:

“No more victories.”

doostelle:

“Wow, that’s beautiful to watch.”

Fans react as Don Jazzy opens up about his likeness to Brandy

Don Jazzy shared a cute video of Tiwa Savage and Brandy on his Instagram page and said the American singer is getting into his eyes.

Read also

Billionaires Club: Obi Cubana, E-Money, KOK, and more reactions display incredible dance skills in cute video

Although the music producer shared Tiwa’s video to promote her song, fans of the music producer are more focused on her statement about Brandy.

Nigerians, however, have told the All Is In Order singer to focus on his first love who is Rihanna.

kriss_iso:

“The goal is Rihanna or nothing.”

violetgambeauty:

“Fluffy Donny leaves Brandy to focus on Huey.”

Source: Legit.ng


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Grammy winner Babalola to perform in Lagos https://medfordjazz.org/grammy-winner-babalola-to-perform-in-lagos/ https://medfordjazz.org/grammy-winner-babalola-to-perform-in-lagos/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 02:27:19 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/grammy-winner-babalola-to-perform-in-lagos/ Ferdinand Ekechukwu As a prelude to his homecoming concert in Lagos today, two-time Grammy-winning musician Lekan Babalola released a new body of work earlier this year, titled ‘Mr. Lakaye ‘, on local and international digital stores. The 11 track album embraces a mix of jazz, funk and world music with the signature touch of Afrobeat. […]]]>

Ferdinand Ekechukwu

As a prelude to his homecoming concert in Lagos today, two-time Grammy-winning musician Lekan Babalola released a new body of work earlier this year, titled ‘Mr. Lakaye ‘, on local and international digital stores. The 11 track album embraces a mix of jazz, funk and world music with the signature touch of Afrobeat. This would be the repertoire on which the master percussionist will satisfy the appetite of his African fans and music lovers with his self-produced album.

Guests at the Windy Cool Music Party for his album listening night, which promises to be an eclectic mix of musical influences, would have the chance to see the 61-year-old reigning at Ogidi Studios in Lekki Phase I, Lagos. A statement attributed to Winifred Okpapi, Head of Strategy, Arts & Talents, said: “We are privileged to have one of the greatest among us and this is just the beginning as we recount his story. Being a master percussionist and brilliant curator, we look forward to having you with us at the prestigious Ogidi Studios to learn more and see him in action.

Babalola is well known for his innovative musical style, using his native Yoruba language steeped in traditional music, Afrobeat and funky dancing. Her voice is known to explode in Yoruba to a bouncy melody enriched with contagious electronic elements and complemented by her signature percussion sound. The title track of the album “Mr Lakaye” is packed with overwhelming pop influence, evoking the pop and soul train fever of the 80s. ‘Time Come’, the first track of the album is a tribute to the father of the percussionist, Olayiwola Babalola for his contribution to the composition of gospel music.

Babalola’s father was the church choirmaster and accordionist. As a composer, his father made him sit down at the age of six to play the drums or the cowbell while he composed and arranged songs. This childhood experience became very influential in his musical career. He then formed a quilting group with his peers. Another profound influence on the sound of Babalola is the Afrobeat King himself, Fela Kuti. One of the songs on the album, ‘Your Highness’, which has a video filmed in Lagos, precisely on the island of Lagos, is an afrobeat track that praises Fela.

Babalola is known to be the first person that Fela Kuti rented out his famous New Afrika shrine in 1987. Additionally, he introduced the Fela Kuti fan club to the world, running it from his Kalakuta residence on Gbemisola Street, Ikeja. The elder had direct experience with the evolution of Afrobeat and the promotion of African ideology by Fela. The Yoruba worldview forms a powerful crust in the sound of Babalola. He satisfies the curiosity of his Western audience with the essentials of mythology and history which he breaks down beat after beat.

One of Nigeria’s most accomplished musicians, Babalola has jointly won the Grammy Awards twice. He first won it in 2006 for his work on Ali Farka Touré’s In the Heart of the Moon, and has been credited on three songs. He won a second Grammy in 2009 for his work on Cassandra Wilson’s album Loverly.

Also in his professional career, his percussion skills were honed after joining a group called the Samba Samba Band and later the New York-based group Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, playing Bongo drums and performing in jazz music. Upon arriving in the UK, Babalola went on to work with notable artists such as Prince, Ernest Ranglin, Branford Marsalis, African Jazz All Stars, Roy Ayers, David Byrne, Damon Albarn and Tony Allen, among others. His long-standing romance with Anglo-European culture and music in particular has borne another fruit: a woman, Kate Luxmoore with whom he has five children.

Luxmoore was his musical collaborator and composed a few tracks on the album. His previous albums include Songs of Icon (2006), Kabioye (2005) and 12 Package (2005). Babalola has lived in the UK since 1980 when he left Nigeria for the UK to study Automotive Engineering at the Chelsea College of Aeronautical and Automobile Engineering after winning a Lagos State Scholarship. He however dropped out of the engineering program for music and then enrolled at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design where he studied film. He continued his studies at the Northern Film School where he obtained his master’s degree.


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Celebrated EV Lakeshore Music changes location SanTan Sun News https://medfordjazz.org/celebrated-ev-lakeshore-music-changes-location-santan-sun-news/ https://medfordjazz.org/celebrated-ev-lakeshore-music-changes-location-santan-sun-news/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 01:08:31 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/celebrated-ev-lakeshore-music-changes-location-santan-sun-news/ By Bridgette RedmanDonor The dream of two Valley Jazz supporters will open in October. Bob and Gretchen Ravenscroft built the new 30,000 square foot performance hall named after them at 8445 E. Hartford Drive in the Scottsdale Perimeter Complex. The first resident company to perform there will be Lakeshore Music, which is leaving the Tempe […]]]>

By Bridgette Redman
Donor

The dream of two Valley Jazz supporters will open in October.

Bob and Gretchen Ravenscroft built the new 30,000 square foot performance hall named after them at 8445 E. Hartford Drive in the Scottsdale Perimeter Complex.

The first resident company to perform there will be Lakeshore Music, which is leaving the Tempe Center for the Arts. The opening show, The Kenny Barron Trio, is sold out.

Lakeshore founder and artistic director Woody Wilson says the anticipated sales for the season are impressive. Of the 1,800 places available for the season, only around 500 remain.

“It’s a wonderful new building,” Wilson says. “It’s 200 seats, that’s what we had at the TCA and I’m delighted with it.”

Wilson says the Ravenscrofts have supported Lakeshore since its founding in 2009 and during the pandemic.

“So when Bob said he was going to build a theater in Scottsdale and asked if we would like to come with him, I said, ‘Alright,’ Wilson recalls.

“We’ve been at TCA for a long time and we’ve seen the ups and downs of the building. I helped pass the arts tax, which supports building now. My contact with Tempe still remains, but I just moved to another building.

Wilson says the building is more high-tech than the others. It is a recording and listening facility with a sound system that it calls unrivaled.

“It incorporates the Constellations sound system, which is a leading sound system for buildings and places around the world,” Wilson said.

“No expense has been spared to make this room a video center and a broadcasting center. There is a sound studio behind the hall itself. It has everything new. It’s exciting in terms of acoustics and fidelity.

Ravenscroft director David Bauer agreed the location was the couple’s dream.

“They had the desire to establish a venue that achieves the highest quality experience of music and artistic excellence,” said Bauer.

“Ravenscroft embodies their heart and passion for presenting the arts and music at the highest level of excellence possible. At the heart of who Bob and Gretchen are is that they want music and the arts to be presented in a way that calls attention to God or draws people to the creative wonder that God places in artists and the musicians.

Bob Ravenscroft is a lifelong art lover. The couple’s non-profit foundation, Music Serving the Word, is committed to showcasing the arts in meaningful ways. Bauer says the building is helping the Ravenscroft do this.

“We are inheriting a series that is already well established, that has a good track record and a good dynamic and we are able to host something that is already ready,” said Bauer. “It made sense for us to partner with Woody. (The series) will create a sensation in the community and provide him with a spectacular place to bring all his clients who have followed him for years.

Bauer says the venue allows for video and video mapping on the side and back walls.

“What sets us apart from a lot of other places is that this particular place was built with the highest level of commitment to architecture and design when it comes to acoustics,” Bauer added.

“The technology that has been implemented and integrated into the space is unique. It creates an immersive experience for the audience.

In addition to the 200-seat concert hall, the venue is home to Jazzbird, a lounge that, starting Fridays in October, will host music from popular and emerging local musicians. They will serve light meals and a selection of local wines and craft beers.

“The Jazzbird is a suspended space on Friday nights when we do our weekly work,” says Bauer. “Once a month we have another series called Jazz for the Soul. It’s a relaxed, performance-oriented space where you can come and enjoy food and drink, sit in a beautiful lounge environment, and enjoy a beautiful stage with audio, video and lighting capabilities that will serve you well. also to create an immersive bar experience. It’s a complete jazz show stage experience, much like a New York jazz club. “

Lakeshore’s opening reception is at Jazzbird, which can accommodate approximately 100 clients.

Wilson says their season hardly happened. During the pandemic shutdown, Wilson’s wife Carol died of complications from cancer.

She will be honored during the first of nine piano-centric performances. Carol never missed a performance.

“Each of these shows has a great pianist,” Wilson says.

Season tickets went on sale May 24. They are slightly more expensive because it costs more to put artists in hotels and feed them in Scottsdale.

“We want people to come and see this beautiful facility,” Wilson says. “It’s remarkable that people actually have the means to build a building like this and take risks,” Wilson says.

“The Ravenscrofts have been an integral part of the Phoenix jazz and music scene for many years. They are one of the leading jazz music philanthropists in the United States. Asking someone to step in and build a building like this with their own money is quite remarkable nationally. “

Bauer agrees that the building will be a major boon for jazz enthusiasts.

“If they’re looking for something more than a gig with sound, but something that really makes you a part of the whole performance – this will be the perfect place to get it, ”Bauer said.

Ravenscroft Room

Scottsdale Perimeter Complex

8445 E. Hartford Drive, Scottsdale

lakeshoremusic.org


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Omar Sosa and Seckou Keita celebrate their second album SUBA – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://medfordjazz.org/omar-sosa-and-seckou-keita-celebrate-their-second-album-suba-santa-cruz-sentinel/ https://medfordjazz.org/omar-sosa-and-seckou-keita-celebrate-their-second-album-suba-santa-cruz-sentinel/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 21:03:25 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/omar-sosa-and-seckou-keita-celebrate-their-second-album-suba-santa-cruz-sentinel/ In the summer of 2020, during an easing of the lockdown restrictions in the event of a pandemic, Omar Sosa and Seckou Keita traveled to the island of Menorca to start collaborating on their second album “SUBA”. After developing the songs, the album was recorded in Osnabrück, Germany, and on October 22, SUBA will be […]]]>

In the summer of 2020, during an easing of the lockdown restrictions in the event of a pandemic, Omar Sosa and Seckou Keita traveled to the island of Menorca to start collaborating on their second album “SUBA”.

After developing the songs, the album was recorded in Osnabrück, Germany, and on October 22, SUBA will be released worldwide on the bendigedig label. SUBA also stars Venezuelan percussionist Gustavo Ovalles and follows the trio’s 2017 debut album Translucent Water. SUBA is the word for “sunrise” in Mandingo, Seckou Keita’s native language.

Cuban-born Sosa is a seven-time Grammy-nominated jazz pianist who mixes traditional Afro-Cuban rhythms and melodies with contemporary styles. Sosa started playing percussion and marimba at the age of 8 and only started playing the piano due to the lack of marimbas in Havana. On September 16, Sosa presented the world premiere of his multimedia production “Motherland Journey” at SFJAZZ with Kenyan-born sculptor Githinji Wa’mbire and drummer Amaury Acosta. Sosa left Cuba in 1993 to live in Ecuador before coming to San Francisco. He lived in the Bay Area from 1995 to 1999 when he moved to Barcelona.

Keita was born in Senegal and started playing the kora (African harp) at the age of 7, under the tutelage of his grandfather. Keita’s mother’s family has been made up of griots (storytellers-musicians) and kora players for three centuries and her father is a descendant of Sunjata Keita, founder of the medieval empire of Mali. Keita also sings and plays talking drum and djembe on SUBA.

Co-produced by Steve Argüelles, SUBA also includes Jaques Morelenbaum on cello, Dramane Dembélé on flute and Yohann Henry with modular effects. SUBA’s upcoming tour includes a concert at the EFG London Jazz Festival on November 19th.

Sosa and Keita first met in 2012 and their collaboration has been creative, spiritual and rhythmic. Sosa’s devotion to the Afro-Cuban Santería religion matches Keita’s Islamic faith. Sosa describes the new album as “a hymn to hope, to a new dawn of compassion and real change in a post-pandemic world, a visceral reiteration of humanity’s eternal prayer for peace and unity” .

Music based on freedom

Q: “Tell me about being together to create SUBA”.

Sosa: “The creative process must have all of these ingredients; good environment, good food and good company. When you have them together, it’s a perfect setting for making music. I said to Seckou: ‘Let’s go to my home in Menorca facing the sea and create music based on freedom. Let’s see how nature can express itself through us! We cooked and ate together; it was a beautiful creative process. Every day, Seckou would come in the morning and we would walk on the beach. I would do my yoga. And you see the result in the file. It is a peaceful testimony of contemplation.

Keita: “It was a special and privileged moment in the midst of all the madness of the pandemic. We had this little window where it was possible to meet in Omar’s house in Menorca and I thought it would be a great opportunity to spend time with my kids as well. Having them with them and Omar’s family brought a different energy and a reminder of what matters in life. There was a lot of laughter, great food and time to think.

The ocean is the mother

Q: “The ocean is so vast, calm and powerful at the same time. The song “Voices of the Sea” has a sadness, touching the role of the ocean as a passage for migrants and slaves. “

Keita: “The ocean is a constant reminder of the distance, travel and fragility of the world and the need to be close to those you love. In Senegal and Gambia, the sea plays an essential role in our history; he brought the British and the French to our shores and took our people as slaves. Can you imagine the terror these people must have experienced? They were forcibly taken on a dangerous journey into the unknown. The sea evokes a lot of sadness but also nostalgia for me, to be on the beach with family and friends. And that gives rise to hope.

Sosa: “In my religion – Santería – the sea is the mother of the world. And the mother always gives love to the child. And that’s what the ocean is for the entire planet; it is love and light. The ocean for me is optimism. One of the best places to meditate is by the ocean, man.

Of the heart

Q: “One of the songs is called ‘Korason’ which of course sounds like the Spanish word for heart – ‘corazon’.

Sosa: “I always like to play with words. When you say the name it sounds like “corazon” because it comes from the heart. But we decided to spell it like the instrument, the kora. More “son” like a montuno sound (Afro-Cuban style of music). A Korason is like a montuno sound played with the kora. Basically it was one of the songs we wrote in Menorca and the idea was to touch the souls of people in a positive way by saying “Hey, it’s all about peace, love and love. ‘unity”. When we created the song, that’s what we thought. And indeed, Seckou plays a bit of the montuno sound a la kora! It’s a little mix between African music, Venezuelan music, Western music, Afro-Cuban music and a bit of electronics.

Rhythm

Q: “The pace is so important to both of you. In addition to piano and kora, you sing, play marimba, talking drum and djembe on SUBA.

Sosa: “Personally, every record I make, I play the balafon; sometimes I play the marimba and sometimes the xylophone. It is an important instrument in all African countries of the continent. And this is really my main instrument! I started with percussion. I don’t want to forget that I am a percussionist! (laughs) So for me playing the balafon on this record, it’s like I always say, it’s a way for me to say thank you to Africa for giving me the opportunity to learn how to play Tanzanian balafon, and a little bit the way they play in Mali. I combine that with traditional Afro-Cuban rhythms and have fun when I play. Really funny!”

Keita: “The talking drum is a means of communication without words. Friends can communicate without words. For my collaboration with Omar, being a drummer at heart gives us an additional golden tool. It allows us to feel the tempo. In the studio, we sometimes barely use the metronome. Our polyrhythmic encounter of instruments is done with less effort.

Good vibes

Q: “This album is so beautiful and soothing. “

Sosa: “This album is our response to COVID! Seckou and I decided to go to the studio during the lockdown. As soon as they open, they give us the opportunity to travel. First of all, we went to Menorca to prepare the music and develop the compositions. And as soon as we had the chance, we went to Osnabrück, Germany, to record with Gustavo Ovalles on percussion. It was a small team and we worked really well together. I’m really happy with the result because, in my humble opinion, this world needs peace, man. This world needs love, unity and hope. It is through this music that we present peace and light. We called the record SUBA, a word from Seckou’s Mandiko language. It means sunrise.

Keita: “We have this connection. There is joy in being on stage together – to be free to go into the unknown with our music, but at the same time secure with the contribution of Gustavo (percussion). We also have a spiritual bond, which comes from having been brought up in different places but with a strong bond with our homeland. Suba to me is a smiling sunrise, hope for a new day, leaving the darkness behind with prayers, determination and blessings for the future. If only we could look ahead to see every sunrise in the future, even with the darkness and the unknowns, and face them with positive vibes to start the day.

Sosa: “I am a positive person and my mission is to create music and art that spreads peace and unity. And that’s what I keep doing. We have no choice, man. You know? We have a mission and we must continue our mission. It is what it is.

Listen to this interview with Omar Sosa and songs from SUBA Thursday lunchtime on Transformation Highway with John Malkin on KZSC 88.1 FM / kzsc.org.


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Yaeji, Bartees Strange, Amaarae, Angel Bat Dawid and KeiyaA on the future of music https://medfordjazz.org/yaeji-bartees-strange-amaarae-angel-bat-dawid-and-keiyaa-on-the-future-of-music/ https://medfordjazz.org/yaeji-bartees-strange-amaarae-angel-bat-dawid-and-keiyaa-on-the-future-of-music/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 15:03:42 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/yaeji-bartees-strange-amaarae-angel-bat-dawid-and-keiyaa-on-the-future-of-music/ Strange bartees: Everyone in my life has always cared about money. My mom was an amazing opera singer, and I grew up watching her sing in opera houses all over the world. But it was hard for her: she was successful but the way they treated her, and the money, was crap. She was a […]]]>

Strange bartees: Everyone in my life has always cared about money. My mom was an amazing opera singer, and I grew up watching her sing in opera houses all over the world. But it was hard for her: she was successful but the way they treated her, and the money, was crap. She was a teacher for 20 years and was never tenured. Classic black shit. It was heartbreaking. So I felt like the only way to be happy was to find a job and earn money. I was a press secretary in the Obama administration for a while. I used to do jobs like that and I hated it. All I wanted was to make music, but all I could think of was if I chose music, I couldn’t make any money and I couldn’t have a family. It would be impossible, but everything is impossible. Getting a good job is impossible. Going to a good school is impossible. Graduation is impossible. I didn’t graduate – I lied my ass in the White House – but I was fed up with lying and had to be myself. Now I get DMs all the time from black kids in the country like, “Brother, are you from Mustang, Oklahoma?” “

KeiyaA: I sympathize so much with the Bartees story. I grew up in Southeast Chicago and my family didn’t think music was the best way to make money. I dropped out of college because I was working full time and majored in jazz, which meant I also played in four or five different ensembles. My sanity got so crazy that I quit. All that aside, I got this job at a tech startup that sold tickets to events. I thought I had done it: I had a salary, team events, and a fridge with kombucha on tap. [Laughs] But like Bartees said, I was lying about who I am. I forced myself to concede, to earn money to survive. Success for me is like what I’m doing right now. To earn money to be myself, but also to see other people who look like me, who synthesize art as I do, who see the world as I do. I want to exist fully, be rewarded for it, and then bring in other people with the same story.

Amaarae: I agree with you 100 percent. Right now, coming from Ghana, I’m probably the only freelance artist I’ve ever seen doing things this far from the community. Do shows here, play Pitchfork, Governors Ball, be able to make headlines. I don’t see the kids at home doing it, and that’s because our community has been so restrictive on the type of music you can do. As I am experimental, there is no voice given to him at home. Well I think the world still needs to hear it. And then the world receives it. There are so many kids doing what I do at home, saying “How are you going to do it?” How do I show them how I did this so that they don’t have to go through the pain of rejection that comes from our community?

Back in Ghana, if you don’t make a record that people can dance to, they’re like, “OK, you got out of here”. You can’t play shows, you can’t sell music, nothing. Every year, you have to have a good dance track record, to be able to play concerts and earn money. There’s about 1,000 kids doing experimental shit, and they’re all stuck. Even though there is the Internet, they need resources, they need education. And my daily question is, “How can I provide these resources and how do I educate them?” Because really and really I started doing what I was doing with nothing, my brother. And my gift was that my mom really insisted, “If you want to make music, go to college, do your four years when you’re in college, take a music class in business, learn all that you can, and I’ll let you make music. This is the most important thing for artists of color: education. We’re literally wasting our time if we can’t tell people, bar for bar, that’s how I did it, take that info, tweak it, whatever, but it’s gonna take you less time than it didn’t take me.


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BADBADNOTGOOD: Talk Memory Album Review https://medfordjazz.org/badbadnotgood-talk-memory-album-review/ https://medfordjazz.org/badbadnotgood-talk-memory-album-review/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/badbadnotgood-talk-memory-album-review/ BADBADNOTGOOD is sometimes nicknamed “alt jazz”, a quick and easy tag, but not without truth. It was during a jazz program at Humber College in Toronto that the group came together and discovered a mutual affinity for hip-hop. Two first albums, BBNG and BBNG2, reinvented well-known rap songs as post-bop and lounge jams, connecting the […]]]>

BADBADNOTGOOD is sometimes nicknamed “alt jazz”, a quick and easy tag, but not without truth. It was during a jazz program at Humber College in Toronto that the group came together and discovered a mutual affinity for hip-hop. Two first albums, BBNG and BBNG2, reinvented well-known rap songs as post-bop and lounge jams, connecting the two great American institutions in the opposite direction as jazz rap artists like Guru and Freestyle Fellowship. In 2015, BBNG had recorded a joint album with Ghostface Killah — The Stoned Grooves of Sour soul gave Tony Starks his most replayable project of the past decade – and their resume includes work with Kendrick Lamar and Tyler, the creator, two other artists who love to fuse jazz and rap. After the dusty jukebox-soul and the eclectic electronica of 2016 IV, the last album of the group, Talk Memory, is its tightest turn to date, featuring a group often defined by its proximity to modern hip-hop in the idiom of more classic jazz sounds.

This does not mean Talk Memory feels overwhelmed. The group deconstructs classic sounds, scrutinizes their components and reconstructs them with their own original parts. The velvety playing and the slightly psychedelic grooves are still present, but Talk Memory is also BBNG’s most complex songwriting record to date: it draws you in with vibrant hooks and melodic flourishes, then begs you to come back and fully absorb its intricacies. The nine-minute opening “Signal From the Noise” brings the album to life with radiated sounds from the cosmos, Sun Ra’s spirit looming above, before a simple yet moving piano riff emerges . The electric guitar underlying the arrangement is indebted to Miles Davis’ hip masterpieces of the 1970s, and the whole thing evolves into a polychromatic cascading performance. Elsewhere, Leland Whitty’s swirling, kaleidoscopic saxophone leads “Open Channels,” a witty jazz number that nods to Pharoah Sanders. The group that once viewed ancient sounds as something to be twisted and reformed are now traveling in the same lineage.

BADBADNOTBIEN made Talk Memory without founding member Matthew Tavares, who left the band in 2019. Because the main trio — Tavares, bassist Chester Hansen, drummer Alexander Sowinski — appeared in such harmony and generally shared the credit, it was always more of the question. group dynamics than any soloist or conductor. In the absence of Taveres synths, Hansen now offers a range of pianos, organs and synthesizers. With longtime collaborator Whitty on their second album as a full-time member, the group moves on to a post-Tavares existence without a palpable sense of loss.

The guests, however, are a definite asset. Three songs (plus a cover) feature veteran Brazilian composer Arthur Verocai and his string group. BBNG’s music has always been smoky and dimly lit, but Verocai’s arrangements add scale and romance to the “City of Mirrors” cutscene. The way the flowing strings complete the band on “Love Proceeding” approaches the serenity of smooth jazz. Like Bird’s “bebop with strings” approach on Charlie Parker with ropes, or the recruitment of Jon Brion by Kanye West on Late check-in, Verocai brings an extra dimension to these compositions. Later, Terrace Martin’s alto saxophone leads the closer epic ‘Talk Meaning’, complemented by Brandee Younger’s dreamy harp. The extended group plays fervently but never loses control.

The presence of the guests prompts BBNG to improve its own playing. “Unfolding (Momentum 73)” opens with the ambient sounds of Laraaji’s electric zither. A swirling keyboard melody plays below as Whitty – a melodic, inventive saxophonist in incredible form throughout the album – coasts. Then, in a smooth transition, Whitty’s instrument begins to reflect the floating melody that has been present throughout. It’s an incredible sleight of hand that sums up the sweetness and imagination of these arrangements. BADBADNOTGOOD is known to reverse tradition, but Talk Memory is not only their best album, it’s proof of the historical appreciation that grounds their reverence.


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Kentuck Festival returns for its 50th with Kathryn Tucker Windham Stage https://medfordjazz.org/kentuck-festival-returns-for-its-50th-with-kathryn-tucker-windham-stage/ https://medfordjazz.org/kentuck-festival-returns-for-its-50th-with-kathryn-tucker-windham-stage/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 02:10:47 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/kentuck-festival-returns-for-its-50th-with-kathryn-tucker-windham-stage/ The Kentuck Festival of the Arts will return after a pandemic year of its fall collage of sights, sounds, flavors and textures for tens of thousands of people walking, shopping and playing in Kentuck Park. Given the COVID-19 sweep, the Kentuck Art Center in downtown Northport generated what it could last fall, hosting a virtual […]]]>

The Kentuck Festival of the Arts will return after a pandemic year of its fall collage of sights, sounds, flavors and textures for tens of thousands of people walking, shopping and playing in Kentuck Park.

Given the COVID-19 sweep, the Kentuck Art Center in downtown Northport generated what it could last fall, hosting a virtual market from October 2020 to December 31, seeking to help hundreds of artists to make up for lost income from what, for many, would have been among their biggest weekends of the year.

So build on the roots of the 1971 Northport Heritage Street Fair and consider last year’s online event as the 49th, October 16-17, 2021, is celebrated as the 50th annual arts festival. of Kentuck.

Some differences will be apparent: masks will be required from everyone in the field, when not actively eating or drinking, and in the event shuttles. Artists’ booths will be more spaced and patrons will be encouraged not to hurry in or around. A mobile medical unit managed by doctors certified by the board of directors will be on the festival grounds to offer free doses of Pfizer vaccine.


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Ohio Reveries: local talents launch new collection https://medfordjazz.org/ohio-reveries-local-talents-launch-new-collection/ https://medfordjazz.org/ohio-reveries-local-talents-launch-new-collection/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 19:11:36 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/ohio-reveries-local-talents-launch-new-collection/ Zack Fletcher is a prolific singer-songwriter / guitarist from Bowling Green, Ohio. The ghosts of his life experience permeate his songs through poetic lyricism, captivating guitar motifs and ethereal melodies. His music has been described as deep, emotional and haunting; a musical catharsis translating into a powerful live performance and an intimate listening experience. His […]]]>

Zack Fletcher is a prolific singer-songwriter / guitarist from Bowling Green, Ohio. The ghosts of his life experience permeate his songs through poetic lyricism, captivating guitar motifs and ethereal melodies. His music has been described as deep, emotional and haunting; a musical catharsis translating into a powerful live performance and an intimate listening experience. His first EP, “Dead Ends”, was originally recorded in 2009 and laid the foundation for his band, Moths in the Attic (MITA).

Moths in the attic
Based in northwest Ohio and trained by Fletcher, MITA released their self-titled debut album in 2019. Fletcher and Michael Williams, a saxophonist he met in college, have started performing together, adding a jazz texture to the acoustic work of Fletcher. Williams merges influences from smooth jazz, R&B and hip-hop. Later, percussionist Kevin Jorrey was added, bringing the energy of a dynamic rock drummer and solidifying the band’s haunting, visceral sound.

Together, the trio merges influences of rock and classical guitar with progressive, folk and jazz notes, creating “ghostly sound compositions”. Since 2016, MITA has performed in various venues across the Midwest, including festivals such as the Black Swamp Arts Festival, and has performed in support of a wide variety of artists such as Tyler Childers, Helmet, Two Tons of Steel and OWEL. With their first tour canceled due to COVID-19, MITA recorded a series of videos, “Songs from a Distance,” following their debut album. Their music can be found on favorite music platforms or on their website: mothsintheattic.com

A new musical exploration
But Fletcher’s role with MITA isn’t his only musical adventure. He also writes and records original solo works.

“The Traveler”, released last July, is the first song in a new collection called Ohio Reveries; songs inspired by Fletcher’s house and the places she took him to. Five new tracks will be released as singles in the second half of 2021 with the full collection to follow. Fletcher’s new release follows his classically inspired acoustic instrumental collection, “Vignettes” (2020), and his previously mentioned alt-folk / rock epic “Moths in the Attic” (2019). The latter received praise from the independent press who described him as “beautiful”, “captivating” and “perfectly executed”. The album was produced independently in his hometown of Bowling Green at DLT Studios and mastered at Jack White’s Third Man Records in Detroit. A portion of all “Moths in the Attic” album sales goes to local affiliates of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

The songs explore themes of loss and life today, something we all need to remember from time to time. After the sudden passing of several friends and acquaintances, Fletcher was struck by how much these people had been loved and full of life. “The Traveler” reflects on the fragility of life and encourages the listener to be present in the here and now, and to live for those who can no longer be.

Visit: zackfletchermusic.com/music


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