jazz store – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 18:07:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://medfordjazz.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-73-150x150.png jazz store – Medford Jazz http://medfordjazz.org/ 32 32 ‘Ghosts of Segregation’ Exhibit Explores America’s Past at the Charles Allis Art Museum | WUWM 89.7 FM https://medfordjazz.org/ghosts-of-segregation-exhibit-explores-americas-past-at-the-charles-allis-art-museum-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 15:34:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/ghosts-of-segregation-exhibit-explores-americas-past-at-the-charles-allis-art-museum-wuwm-89-7-fm/ A new art exhibit in Milwaukee, titled “Ghosts of Segregation,” features photos of physical remains from the Jim Crow era. The images depict places like businesses that had separate entrances for black people and areas where people of color have been murdered. At Charles Allis Art Museum, the historic mansion is now a space where […]]]>

A new art exhibit in Milwaukee, titled “Ghosts of Segregation,” features photos of physical remains from the Jim Crow era. The images depict places like businesses that had separate entrances for black people and areas where people of color have been murdered.

At Charles Allis Art Museum, the historic mansion is now a space where guests can learn about segregation in America. The exhibition features the photography of Richard Frishman.

Dozens of images decorate the walls of the mansion, each accompanied by a description that provides historical information. The larger photo of the Great Hall shows the exterior of an ice cream shop in Pascagoula, Mississippi, taken in 2018. Two people of color place an order in the front of the building.

Senior Curator Phoenix Brown described the image.

“We see to the right that there’s a window, and there’s also a figure inside that window,” Brown said. “This window used to be where people of color had to order their meals on the side of the building. They weren’t allowed to order from the front, and then they had to wait for white customers to finish ordering before they left. the command has been executed.”

Although the photos eschew graphic content, Brown said seeing the exhibit can be an intense experience. For example, when people see and read about the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Louisiana.

Extended conversation between WUWM’s Eddie Morales and photographer Richard Frishman.

In 2019, it was the third predominantly black church burned down in two weeks in acts of hatred by the same arsonist.

The intense themes are why areas like the great room and living room have been revamped for people to decompress and reflect. There is also a comment box for visitors.

Brown said guests shared their thoughts on the history and continuation of racism. She read a visitor’s comment:

“Brutal,” wrote the visitor. “This story makes me think about how normalized segregation was and in many ways how separate we still are. Of course, there are no mandates people can use entries on, but look our legal system. Look at the race profile of so many corporations and boards. Look at how many old white men are making our laws. I’m super crazy about it.

Brown’s take-home message from the visitor is that they are very aware of how systematic racism still exists.

Frishman said the segregated histories of buildings like the ice cream shop are often camouflaged. During his research, he saw a familiar place: The Paramount Theater in Clarksdale, Mississippi. He had passed the building several times, but had never noticed the old entrance reserved for people of color. It still meanders around the back of the brick building.

Photo by Richard Frishman of the Paramount Theater in Mississippi shows the “colorful” entrance used by blacks and people of color when the theater opened in 1918.

“For me, it was an escape route, and for most people who see it, that’s what they think,” he said. “That’s what so many of these images represent. Our history, for better or for worse, is often depicted around us in physical ways. But we’re not keen enough to realize it.”

Brown pointed to a photo of a former jazz club in Chicago, which was particularly popular in the 1920s and 1940s. The building now operates as a beauty salon, but its history as the Grand Terrace Café can be seen in the original jazz-themed mural inside the store.

“I think this photograph is really interesting because it’s literally an image that points to a very strong inclusive story of jazz musicians being welcomed into a space,” she said. “Now it’s just a store. I think Rich understood very well what a barber shop looks like in a black community with different items for sale. The mural kind of fell apart.”

Frishman said he was inspired to start taking pictures of the “ghosts of segregation” after the 2016 presidential election.

“It was the election that got me thinking about what it means to live in America,” he said. “My nostalgia for when I grew up represented a really privileged view of the world.”

Frishman added that photographing the sites is one of his ongoing efforts to learn about other peoples and cultures.

“Even if I try, it’s still limited. I need to talk to people who have had other experiences than me.”

He hopes people will leave the exhibit with a new perspective on how to understand the hardships others endure.

Frishman will host a free virtual artist talk on September 8. A Zoom link will be posted on the Museum’s website, charlesallis.org.

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Jazz musician Roy Ayers – The Forward https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-musician-roy-ayers-the-forward/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 23:05:14 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-musician-roy-ayers-the-forward/ Author Nabil Ayers, left; his father, jazz musician Roy Ayers, right Courtesy of Nabil Ayers (photo by author and book cover); and Scott Dudelson/Getty Images (photo Roy Ayers) By TaRessa Stovall August 15, 2022 Nabil Ayers carries the surname of a famous father he barely knows except in the ubiquitous music of Roy Ayers – […]]]>

Nabil Ayers carries the surname of a famous father he barely knows except in the ubiquitous music of Roy Ayers – most famously in the 1976 jazz-soul-funk album of that name with the hit “Everybody Loves the Sunshine”. For young Ayers, he appears to surprise him when he least expects it.

Flashback to 1970, when Louise Braufman, a former white Jewish ballerina working as a waitress in New York City, took one look at the rising African-American jazz composer and vibraphonist and thought she would have a baby with him. .

After a few casual dates, she asked Roy Ayers and he accepted, warning her that his career was his priority and that he was unavailable for a serious relationship or any form of parenthood.

Nabil Ayers was born from this union and grew up with strong self-esteem, despite the absence of his father. His new memoirs “My life in the sun: looking for my father and discovering my family”, explores his unconventional yet richly diverse childhood, his own rise in the music industry, and the search for connection with his father, which led to the discovery of paternal black half-siblings and a slave ancestor .

Generations of Jewish ancestors

“Writing the book made me think about my identity and process it,” Ayers said. “I still don’t really identify with a race. There’s my mom who raised me and my dad who was really just DNA, and there’s all the people who helped raise me. I felt like everyone contributed to my identity. How can I choose just one? And that absolutely includes the three generations of Jewish ancestors who are a big part of it.

The book’s title comes from the opening lyrics to Ayers father’s signature hit, “Everybody Loves the Sunshine”, which enjoyed moderate success when released in 1976. Recorded at Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Lady Studios in New York , the song has since become a cultural touchstone with a mix of soul, funk, jazz, rock and electronic music that mixes genres with cross-generational appeal.

And true to the name of the album that contains it, the song is everywhere. It has been sampled over 100 times by an array of artists ranging from Mary J. Blige, Common and Tupac to J. Cole, Snoop Dogg, Pharrell Williams and the Black Eyed Peas, and covered by D’Angelo and Cibo Matto. It has also been used in commercials and movie soundtracks. “I’ve heard it in many different iterations over the years, a lasting and lingering reminder of my otherwise absent father,” Ayers writes.

Thanks to his mother, Ayers didn’t grow up feeling his father’s lack of presence. His brother, jazz saxophonist Alan Braufman, was a strong and unwavering influence. “Every important fatherly moment was with him,” he said.

Culture more than color

He grew up with a strong sense of self in various communities in Greenwich Village, Brooklyn, Boston, and Amherst, Massachusetts. When her mother attended the University of Massachusetts, they lived in PMQs with families of different races, multi-ethnic and multi-racial children, and single parents. Culture was emphasized more than color, he said.

Ayers’ Jewish identity came from family rather than religious institutions. While visiting his mother’s relatives, who were Romanian and Russian Jews, and his grandmother’s father and wife in Flatbush, Ayers enjoyed eating gefilte fish, learning Yiddish, and celebrating holidays. (Interestingly, long before he met Braufman, a young Roy Ayers played with Herbie Mann, who was of similar ancestry.)

“I have incredible memories of all those Jewish experiences in Brooklyn as a mixed-race hippie kid who felt very connected there, not so much religiously as culturally, really loving and respecting him. I felt very cool and proud, like I belonged to something interesting when I was a kid.

His mother and uncle were drawn to the Baha’i faith which emphasized peace and equality. “My contact with Baha’is and Judaism was about good people and good food, things that kids like,” Ayers said.

When he was 10, his mother moved them to Salt Lake City, the predominantly Mormon city where he stood out as different. While some kids asked where he was from, if he was adopted and wanted to touch his Afro, Ayers said his sense of identity was intact from not having been “the weird kid for the 10 first years of my life. He remembers a synagogue and a JCC in Salt Lake City and felt connected to some of the Jewish students at his school.

Musical ambitions

Ayers aspired to play music from an early age. But as a biracial boy, he couldn’t fully identify with appearances by white or black stars like the Beatles and Stevie Wonder. Then, at age 5, he discovered the hard rock band Kiss. The heavy makeup they wore obscured their features, allowing him to imagine new possibilities. “I found something attainable in Kiss,” he wrote. “I had no idea what they looked like in real life and because of that, I felt like there was nothing stopping me from looking like them.” Learning that Kiss members Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley “were two Jews from New York, reinforced my sense of solidarity with them,” he said.

Music remained a constant guideline in his life, thanks to his father’s genes, his mother’s dancing and the encouragement of his uncle Alan. He attended many concerts in his youth, occasionally seeing his father perform, which fueled his youthful ambitions. Ayers played drums in bands with friends from third grade through high school, expanding his musical repertoire and tastes along the way.

As a rite of passage upon graduating from high school, Ayers’ mother suggested he might want to change his last name from Braufman to something easier to spell and pronounce. He accepted, becoming Nabil Ayers as he prepared to attend the University of Pacific Sound in Tacoma, Washington.

It wasn’t his name change.

While his mother was in the hospital after giving birth, his father had the middle name Sol entered on Nabil’s birth certificate. “Once my mum came home, she changed my middle name to Ahmal after an opera she saw,” Ayers said. “I could have been Nabil Sol Braufman all my life.”

A career of his own

Music continued to shape her identity and her career. As a drummer, Ayers has played in several bands including The Long Winters and Tommy Stinson. On his own label, The Control Group/Valley of Search, Ayers has released music by Cate Le Bon, Lykke Li, The Killers, PJ Harvey, Patricia Brennan and her uncle, jazz musician Alan Braufman. He co-founded Seattle’s famed indie rock outlet Sonic Boom Records, which was sold in 2016. Today, he’s president of Beggars Group US, where he oversees creative, marketing, radio, sales and entertainment. other components of the album release for The National. , Big Thief, Grimes, Future Islands and St. Vincent, as well as reissued albums including Pixies’ “Doolittle” which was certified platinum in 2019.

As an adult, Ayers finally contacted his father and learned the names of three half-siblings. Through contact with them and DNA testing, he learned of more ancestors on his father’s side, including a great-great-great-grandfather, Isaac Ayers, who was born into slavery and owned by a man named Dr. Ayers of Ashland, Mississippi.

As the missing parts of his paternal identity became clearer, Ayers found that being biracial impacted his dating attempts. Online dating site apps required him to specify the type of women he wanted to meet. “You can pick races that you like or dislike, that I struggled with,” he said. Friends introduced him to women, most of whom were white. “I quickly discovered that dating brought issues of race to the fore in my life like few other times had,” he wrote.

A Jewish wedding

While attending a colleague’s wedding, Ayers met a woman named AJ. “I thought maybe she was a bit Italian,” he said. He introduced himself and they started dating. He overheard her talking to a relative on the phone who asked if Nabil was Jewish. She replied no. When he later explained his Jewish background, she shared hers, deepening their bond.

They tied the knot in Hollywood four years ago in a Jewish wedding to a female rabbi. AJ’s parents walked her down the aisle to the fiddle music of “Fiddler on the Roof,” while Ayer’s mom and her husband Jim walked him down the aisle to “Everybody Loves the sunshine”.

“We did it all: chuppah, I stomped on a glass and we were lifted on chairs to ‘Hava Nagila,'” he said. “It was very powerful, very connected.”

Ayers and AJ reunite as a family for many vacations. Lighting their menorah reminds him of his great-grandparents. “It’s tradition – doing something that has the same food, the same prayers, reminds me of a time in my life 40 or 50 years ago,” he said.

While writing hasn’t replaced music in Ayers’ life, writing about race and music for The New York Times, NPR, Pitchfork, Rolling Stone and GQ “is my new artistic thing.” As he tours with his memoir — which has received praise from Oprah and Black Jewish actor Daveed Diggs — he continues to expand his sense of self and family on both sides. “I had so many big influences and parts of my life and my Jewish ancestry was a huge, important and memorable part of that,” he said.

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9 of the Most Remarkable Things Famous People Have Said About Utah https://medfordjazz.org/9-of-the-most-remarkable-things-famous-people-have-said-about-utah/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 14:03:45 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/9-of-the-most-remarkable-things-famous-people-have-said-about-utah/ Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes Every year, millions of people visit Utah. Many come to visit the national parks. Others are here for business or religious events or conferences. For decades, celebrities, movie stars and famous personalities of all kinds have come to attend the Sundance Film Festival every January. With this continued exposure to […]]]>

Estimated reading time: 6-7 minutes

Every year, millions of people visit Utah. Many come to visit the national parks. Others are here for business or religious events or conferences. For decades, celebrities, movie stars and famous personalities of all kinds have come to attend the Sundance Film Festival every January.

With this continued exposure to Utah, many high profile and famous people have voiced their opinions about the state. Even before Sundance was a sporting event, notable authors and figures commented on Utah. Here are some of the most notable quotes celebrities have made about Beehive State.

Karl Malone

The postman always delivers, whether he’s in the paint coming out of a pick and roll or at the press conference that follows. The Utah Jazz big man was known during his long career for his original and unabashed commentary in the media. Malone gave NBA fans a plethora of “Malone-isms“, usually in her third-person perspective,” Whitney O’Bannon wrote for Deseret News.

About the location of his franchise, Malone said, “A lot of people don’t know where Utah is, but it’s in Salt Lake,” says azquotes.com. File that one under “Karl has to say what Karl has to say.”

Elon Musk

Business magnate, Tesla CEO and perpetual tabloid subject Elon Musk mentioned Utah when talking about alternative energy at the AGU Environmental Conference in 2015.

In the video, he says, “You could power the whole of the United States with about 150 to 200 square miles of solar panels. The whole of the United States. thing there, I went there.” Utahans and outdoor enthusiasts disagree (based on the five national parks located in Utah).

Ty Burrell

The “Modern Family” star and real-life father and husband loves Utah so much he moved his entire family here. According to a People articlehe, his wife and two daughters lived here between filming his hit sitcom. In fact, he owns several restaurants and a bar in the Salt Lake and Park City areas.

The jovial actor told People, “I loved it from the first time I came here. It’s a very humble place, it’s a very humble place.”

Mark Twain

The prominent 19th-century American author and humorist didn’t have many good things to say about Utah. Twain (born Samuel Langhorne Clemens) traveled west with his brother in hopes of exuberant adventure upon seeing Native Americans and wildlife in the harsh country.

9 of the Most Remarkable Things Famous People Have Said About Utah
Photo: Everett Collection/Shutterstock.com

He wrote about his trip in a travel diary – admittedly years later after having forgotten much of his trip – published under the title “Roughing It”. According to a Article from Deseret News, it included many unflattering descriptions of Mormon women as well as his disappointing encounter with Brigham Young. The mountains, however, enchanted him.

“…We arrived at the summit of Big Mountain, 15 miles from Salt Lake City, where all were glorified with the setting sun, and the most stupendous panorama of mountain peaks ever met burst into view. this sublime spectacle under the arch of a brilliant rainbow!”

Post Malone

Lyrics to Post Malone’s hit “Wow”. say, “Wherever I go / Catch me on the block like I’m Mutombo / 750 Lambo in Utah snow.” I hope Lambo has snow tires! Locals are now claiming the millennial rapper with the tattooed face as a Utah in good faith, says an article from KSL Radio. After performing a show near Great Salt Lake, the musician fell in love with the area and purchased a nearly 13,000 square foot retreat in Cottonwood Heights to relax and enjoy the freedom that Utah offers.

“It’s a free country over there,” he said rolling stone. “For example, you can buy suppressors in Utah. You can do open carry. Walk into the grocery store with a handgun on your hip.”

Dirk Nowitzki

Apparently the Dunking Deutschman is not a fan of Utah or American geography. (Perhaps he took the same course as Karl Malone?)

“Utah is a bad city,” Nowitzki told a reporter in 2001.

To be fair, Nowitzki later explained that there was more to the infamous quote, a ESPN Article clarifies. The Dallas Mavericks faced the Utah Jazz in the first round of the NBA playoffs, and their coach decided to take the team home between Game 1 and Game 2.

A local reporter showed up at the airport and asked Nowitzki why the team wasn’t staying in Salt Lake City, and the young Nowitzki – fresh out of Germany and with limited English skills – fumbled and found this answer. Jazz fans never forgot this lack of respect and made Nowitzki pay for it every time he played in Utah!

9 of the Most Remarkable Things Famous People Have Said About Utah
Photo: Reina Lavulavu/Shutterstock.com

beach boys

“In Utah/The guys and I dig a town called Salt Lake/There’s the grooviest kids/That’s why we never get tired of Salt Lake.” The Beach Boys wrote the ode to the city in 1965, which included nods to Lagoon, winter skiing and the cutest girls in the western states.

In fact, the Beach Boys’ hit “Fun, Fun, Fun” was inspired by a woman from Utah! According to a KSL article, the woman’s father owned a radio station at the height of the group’s fame. She told her dad she was going to the library — yes, in her T-Bird — and instead went to a burger stand at 3300 South and around 2700 East. When her father caught her, she was complaining about the incident to staff the next morning at the radio station. The Beach Boys were guests on the radio show that day, heard about the teenager’s adventure, and wrote a song about it. What an ode to Utah!

Catherine Heigl

What would any type of Utah roster be without Katherine Heigl? The Grey’s Anatomy star moved to Utah in 2010 in search of a slower lifestyle.

“We had big dreams of expanding our family, moving to the mountains and having a quieter life,” she said. Good Housekeeping. “Utah is spectacularly beautiful, the people are wonderful and kind, it’s an easy drive from LA and there’s no traffic!”

Heigl then spoke about the Utah lifestyle where “kids can be kids” and described life on her Oakley ranch with her husband, children and myriad dogs, cats, chickens and of horses.

Robert Redford

Actor and conservationist Robert Redford was the original celebrity who made life cool in Utah. Judith Thurman writes for Architectural Summary. He then fell in love with a local Provo girl and lived a rustic lifestyle between film shoots with his young family on the two acres he purchased for $500 in 1963. That land became the Sundance World famous resort when it finally added the acreage.

“I could see the development starting to go down in the state of Utah. I thought I’d better acquire more land to protect it,” Redford told TIME in 2015. “I thought it would probably be my legacy, to protect the earth.”

Redford recently joined with Utah Open Lands to put 300 acres of pristine wilderness land under permanent protection, in addition to the 1,875 acres of resort town Sundance that he placed in bondage years ago.

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CFX Highlights: The Building Blocks of Restoration https://medfordjazz.org/cfx-highlights-the-building-blocks-of-restoration/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 16:20:40 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/cfx-highlights-the-building-blocks-of-restoration/ SAVANNAH, Ga. — Marketing, operations, and finance are three critical aspects of running a convenience store restoration program. According to Kay Heritage, founder of Big Bon Foods LLC, they’re also the foundation of a three-legged stool, supporting what truly sets a company apart from its competitors: purpose and value. Big Bon Foods’ goal is simply […]]]>

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Marketing, operations, and finance are three critical aspects of running a convenience store restoration program.

According to Kay Heritage, founder of Big Bon Foods LLC, they’re also the foundation of a three-legged stool, supporting what truly sets a company apart from its competitors: purpose and value.

Big Bon Foods’ goal is simply to “elevate more entrepreneurs,” Heritage said during the “New Convenience Retailer Panel” at the 2022 Convenience Foodservice Exchange. hosted by Convenience store news. An entrepreneur who operates a bagel and wood-fired pizza shop, food truck and ghost kitchen in Savannah, Heritage views its employees as individuals and tries to mentor them in business and life skills.

“Restoration is not the final destination for young employees,” she said. “So focus on the purpose of their existence from the beginning.” She pointed to her baker who ultimately wants to be a jazz musician and is happy to work a shift that matches his practices and gigs.

“If they’re ready to learn, we invest in them,” Heritage said. “We ask them what they really want to do.” As a result, Big Bon Foods did not struggle with labor shortages.

Retailers benefit from seeing employees as their biggest asset, regardless of business size, said co-panellist Bassem Nowyhed, multi-franchise owner of morning afternoon c-stores and founder and CEO of Invig Consulting.

“They’re the ones who run your business,” he said, pointing out that store employees lead customers through their customer service and attitude.

In addition to investing in it, Nowyhed suggests retailers seek to make the working day more engaging for employees. One method is to gamify things – for example, the first person to sell a certain amount of a newly introduced product receives a significant bonus.

“Everyone likes hitting targets and goals,” he said.

During the panel, Heritage and Nowyhed discussed other relevant topics, including:

Healthy products — In general, people are starting to switch to healthier foods, which means convenience store operators should look to offer a mix of healthy and indulgent options. Nowyhed cited Foxtrot as a good example of a chain that balances health and convenience.

Inspiration — Retailers can and should imitate and be inspired by those who do good catering without being imitators. “It’s normal to see who’s doing a great job,” Heritage said. “We learn from the masters.”

Omnichannel — This aspect of technology is critical to maximizing foodservice profits. “If you don’t somehow integrate omnichannel […] there is still a lot of money on the table,” Nowyhed said. “The new convenience is taking your product and putting it in the hands of the consumer without them having to come to your house.

Eight essential steps to success

Along with revisiting their purpose and values, convenience store operators need to move beyond rhetoric if they are to succeed in the restaurant business, according to Howland Blackiston, co-director of restaurant and retail consultancy King-Casey.

To date, many chains have refrained from making more than evolutionary or incremental changes to their foodservice offerings, rather than bold moves to seize competitive advantage, Blackiston said. This is largely due to a cultural resistance to change, perceived disadvantages, and the lack of an amazing crisis to drive breakthrough innovations and improvements.

“I don’t think the pain is still there,” he said.

Blackiston outlined eight “absolutes” for convenience stores to take restoration success seriously:

  • Brand your catering business — Everything from decor to equipment to ordering methods should communicate “food” to the customer.
  • Have an exclusive/signature menu – Parker’s Fried Chicken and Texas Born’s Tacos are examples that make the chains memorable. “Developing a signature article is an important step,” Blackiston said.
  • Create a menu strategy – business goals drive strategies in tactics, which are applied to categories and then to individual products.
  • Offer off-site solutions – This can include digital ordering, delivery and drive-thru, and other unconventional means. Blackiston denounced Chick-fil-a’s habit of “breaking the line” by sending store employees to the drive-thru to take orders.
  • Design a Distinctive Environment – Dining initiatives such as Whole Foods Market’s Ramen Bar intentionally signal “this is a place to eat.”
  • Create a restaurant culture – This needs to start at the top because nothing will happen in a chain “unless the people at the top say they want it to happen”.
  • Embrace Continuous Improvement – Area-specific innovation and improvement teams should continuously focus on identifying and resolving improvement opportunities.
  • Innovate through technology — Not all technology will be relevant to all brands, but technology can be used to create an exclusive brand experience.

The 2022 Convenience Foodservice Exchange took place in Savannah on June 21-22. A record number of more than 70 convenience retailers joined vendors and other category thought leaders at this year’s event, held at the Marriott Savannah Riverfront in Savannah, the host city of the South.

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Andy’s Frozen Custard opens in Overland Park, Kansas https://medfordjazz.org/andys-frozen-custard-opens-in-overland-park-kansas/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 13:50:28 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/andys-frozen-custard-opens-in-overland-park-kansas/ Andy’s Frozen Custard, Kansas City’s favorite ice cream and candy store, will delight even more KC candy lovers when it opens its latest store in Overland Park on August 10. The highly anticipated BluHawk, a multi-faceted destination experience, will host the new store, located at 7781 W. 159th Street. It will be one of the […]]]>

Andy’s Frozen Custard, Kansas City’s favorite ice cream and candy store, will delight even more KC candy lovers when it opens its latest store in Overland Park on August 10.

The highly anticipated BluHawk, a multi-faceted destination experience, will host the new store, located at 7781 W. 159th Street. It will be one of the first to open in the mixed-use development and will soon be joined by a sports park, community center and other attractions.

To celebrate the opening, Andy’s is also inviting customers to take a bite of a new kind of treat…no spoon required. The candy shop will add delicious and crunchy caramel apples to the menu. Available for a limited time, Caramel Apples will be served at all Andy’s locations in Kansas City. They’re the perfect match for the popular fall menu that debuts in September.

The expansion to Kansas City has special meaning for the Kuntz family. “Kansas City is my second home, and very near and dear to our family for many reasons, not the least of which is that I was born here,” says Andy Kuntz, owner and CEO of Andy’s Frozen Custard. “BluHawk promises to be an exciting new community and has shown us the same support we have received at all locations in the Kansas City area. We love growing with the city, and will continue to invest here, as we are very proud to put “smiles above chins” serving the most delicious ice creams and treats.”

Andy’s Caramel Apples combine deliciously crisp and tangy Granny Smith apples with melt-in-your-mouth artisan crème caramel and a selection of toppings. Bursting with flavor, the caramel apples are hand-dipped and spun in Reese’s Chunks or Andy’s famous roasted pecans. For an awesome treat, a double caramel dip is also available.

Whether guests are looking for a way to refresh after visiting museums and art galleries, a sweet ending to the perfect grass-fed steak dinner, or to celebrate a Royals, Mavericks or Chiefs victory, the Andy’s menu offers a treat for every occasion. Customer favorite, the James Brownie Funky Jackhammer, made with Andy’s vanilla ice cream, peanut butter and baked brownies, then “drilled and filled” with hot fudge, is a popular dessert after the barbecue. Or try the Choc-O-Rocko Concrete, which mixes chocolate pastry cream, toasted almonds and marshmallow creme, and hits all the right notes while enjoying the smooth sounds of local jazz.

Known as the best ice cream in the world, Andy’s has deep roots in Missouri, with its first store opening in Osage Beach and its current headquarters in Springfield. Since then, the brand has carefully and deliberately grown into a family of over 100 locations, each becoming a local tradition offering the freshest ingredients for an unparalleled flavor experience.

BluHawk’s location is unique in that it’s not a stand-alone building, but it still includes a small patio, plenty of parking, and of course, Andy’s friendly and prompt drive-thru. Andy’s is famous for its Made Fresh Hourly ice cream, Baked Fresh Daily toppings, hand-rolled waffle cones, concretes, jackhammers, sundaes, floats and malts. Andy’s Anywhere is also available, hand-packed and frozen pints, quarts, Quart Combos™ and specialty items for those who want Andy’s Anytime at home, at work and at special events.

Andy’s Frozen Custard is open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The friendly, welcoming staff – putting a smile above your chin with every order – are always focused on quickly serving up the highest quality treats money can buy.

Customers can download the Andy’s Frozen Custard app to join the Yum Squad Loyalty Club, recently named one of America’s Top Loyalty Programs 2022 by Newsweek magazine. In addition to receiving a free concrete after the first visit, Yum Squad members can keep up to date with the latest from Andy’s, including news about seasonal menu offerings loaded with fresh fruit and baked goods, on Instagram (@andys.kc) and Facebook (@AndysOverlandParkKSWest159thStreet/) or via Andy’s website.

The news and information presented in this press release have not been corroborated by RSQFood News Media or Journalistic, Inc.

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Hoping Donovan Mitchell stays with the Jazz https://medfordjazz.org/hoping-donovan-mitchell-stays-with-the-jazz/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 12:00:48 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/hoping-donovan-mitchell-stays-with-the-jazz/ Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell takes to the court in Game 5 of an NBA first-round basketball playoff series against the Dallas Mavericks, Monday, April 25, 2022, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez) By Scot Morgan | The public gallery | August 7, 2022, 12:00 p.m. Open letter to Donovan Mitchell: Utah and its people owe […]]]>

Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell takes to the court in Game 5 of an NBA first-round basketball playoff series against the Dallas Mavericks, Monday, April 25, 2022, in Dallas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Open letter to Donovan Mitchell:

Utah and its people owe you an apology for not making it clear that Utah Senate President Stuart Adams and the Legislature were in complete disagreement with his race theory resolution. I was personally disgusted at the time and proud that you wanted to speak publicly. The parody of this resolution was on par with the lies Alex Jones publicly broadcast about Sandy Hook. It is incomprehensible that such an unChristian attitude is not publicly denounced by all the religious leaders of our State.

Unfortunately, the corruption that exists in the Utah Legislature and the lack of respect for equal rights and opportunities are nationwide problems.

Please give Utah a second chance. Even though Quin Snyder was a great coach, I think Will Hardy will be even better. The moves Danny Ainge has already made should have you excited about the realistic possibilities of winning a championship here in Utah.

Either way, know that the majority of Utah loves and respects you. I was so impressed with your exceptional intelligence and maturity at such a young age when you were drafted by the Utah Jazz. I hope you choose to want to stay here.

Scot Morgan, Salt Lake City

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‘Hamilton’ star to headline gala and more https://medfordjazz.org/hamilton-star-to-headline-gala-and-more/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 10:18:04 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/hamilton-star-to-headline-gala-and-more/ The Connecticut Siting Council will hold two hearings on the proposed Tarpon Towers/AT&T cell tower at 92 Greens Farms Road in Westport. The hearing of witnesses will take place at 2 p.m. and a public comment hearing at 6:30 p.m. The purpose of the 2 p.m. hearing is to receive evidence on the plaintiffs’ assertions […]]]>

The Connecticut Siting Council will hold two hearings on the proposed Tarpon Towers/AT&T cell tower at 92 Greens Farms Road in Westport. The hearing of witnesses will take place at 2 p.m. and a public comment hearing at 6:30 p.m.

The purpose of the 2 p.m. hearing is to receive evidence on the plaintiffs’ assertions that the public need for the facility outweighs the adverse environmental effects of the construction, operation and maintenance of the facility. this one. No public comments will be accepted at 2:00 p.m.

Anyone wishing to speak at the 6:30 p.m. hearing must pre-register with CSC by emailing
siteing.council@ct.gov
with your name, email address and mailing address or by calling before August 8. To comment by phone at the hearing, leave a voicemail at 860-827-2935 with your name, phone number and mailing address. Public statements are limited to three minutes. Participants can join on Zoom. Login information is available on the city’s website.

Public comments may also be submitted to the Board by email or regular mail.

Bobbles & Lace opens a new store

Saugatuck Commercial Real Estate, recently represented Bobbles & Lace, leasing their newest location in Hingham, Mass.

Bobbles & Lace is a women’s clothing store and boutique with nine locations.

SCRE previously negotiated the store’s first location in Connecticut, at 11 Church Lane on Bedford Square in Westport.

‘Hamilton’ actress to headline Westport Country Playhouse gala

Westport Country Playhouse has announced that Renée Elise Goldsberry, who starred in “Hamilton,” will headline “Back to the Playhouse!” Gala evening on September 17.

Goldsberry, who lives in Weston, is perhaps best known for her performance as Angelica Schuyler in “Hamilton,” which won her a Tony Award, Grammy Award, Drama Desk Award and Lucille Lortel Award. She was also nominated for an Emmy for the Disney+ film adaptation. She is currently playing Tina Fey’s new series “GIRLS5EVA”

Goldsberry’s will play Broadway, pop and soul music, backed by a seven-piece band. There will be a pre-show cocktail, live auction and after party with a DJ and dancing, all while providing philanthropic support for the venue.

Robin de Jesús, who lives in Norwalk, will host the event. De Jesús is also a three-time Tony Award-nominated actor, who can be seen in the Netflix streaming service’s adaptation of the film “Tick, Tick….BOOM!”

Barbara K. Streicker, former chair of the theater’s board of directors, will receive the theater leadership award.

Supporter tickets are $350 per person and include access to the show and afterparty.

Patron tickets are $1,250 per person and include the pre-show cocktail, valet parking, priority show seating, recognition as a gala donor and access to the after party.

Benefactor tickets are $2,500 per person and include pre-show cocktail, priority parking, early show seating, recognition as a gala donor, access to the after party and the possibility of meeting the artists after the show.

Tickets are also available for those under 35 for $100 each and include the show and after party.

There are also corporate sponsorship opportunities.

Visit https://westportplayhouse.org/gala2022 for more information and to purchase tickets, or call Catherine MacKay, Westport Playhouse Operations and Special Events Coordinator, at 203-571-1291. The performance hall is located at 25 Powers Court.

Jazz at the Post Office every Thursday

Renowned tenor saxophonist Greg Wall,‘The Jazz Rabbi‘ brings his conducting and booking skills to Joseph J. Clinton VFW Ext. 399 at 465 Riverside Avenue at 7 p.m. every Thursday with Jazz at the Post.

The series begins on August 11 with Brian Q. Torff, a renowned bassist and composer who is currently Director of the Music Program at Fairfield University. Torff is a star bass soloist, leading his own trio and musical director of the Django Reinhardt New York Festival, appearing at Lincoln Center and Birdland in New York.

The music starts at 7 p.m. and the $10 entrance fee goes directly to the musicians.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and feature a five-course dinner prepared by Chef Derek Furino of Latin canteen at Fairfield ($25 per person and seconds are “on the house.”) Shows are open to all ages, and a full bar is available for attendees 21 and older.

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Arts Montco Week, supporting Montgomery County’s 200 arts and culture venues, returns for 2022 https://medfordjazz.org/arts-montco-week-supporting-montgomery-countys-200-arts-and-culture-venues-returns-for-2022/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 16:07:30 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/arts-montco-week-supporting-montgomery-countys-200-arts-and-culture-venues-returns-for-2022/ The Valley Forge Convention and Tourism Board announced the return of Arts Montco Week, a celebratory initiative that supports more than 200 arts, culture and entertainment venues in Montgomery County. The festivities will highlight the region’s artists, animators, creators and attractions that normally represent $100 million in positive economic spinoffs, not to mention hundreds, if […]]]>

The Valley Forge Convention and Tourism Board announced the return of Arts Montco Week, a celebratory initiative that supports more than 200 arts, culture and entertainment venues in Montgomery County. The festivities will highlight the region’s artists, animators, creators and attractions that normally represent $100 million in positive economic spinoffs, not to mention hundreds, if not thousands of jobs. The county, which has hosted such prestigious international entertainment organizations as Circus of the sunBig Apple Circus and the Philadelphia Orchestra will roll out the red carpet for visitors to Arts Montco Week, September 16-25, 2022.

Additionally, this year’s Arts Montco Week festivities include the launch of the first-ever Montco Jazz Fest, a world-class weekend of some of the country’s most celebrated jazz musicians performing in intimate and engaging concerts in the entire Montgomery County area. Events include concerts, jazz brunches and more. A special Fest kick-off event will take place on September 21 at Rivet Canteen and Assembly in Pottstown.

“The Arts Montco brand is an important and vital brand for Valley Forge Tourism, and the addition of our first Montco Jazz Festival helps solidify Montgomery County as a premier arts and culture destination,” said Mike Bowman, President and CEO of VFTCB. “Arts and culture can change us, shape us and have a positive impact on all of our lives. We need it now more than ever.”

The initiative’s goal is to provide visitors with a first-hand look at Montgomery County’s strong arts and entertainment sector and the role it plays in regional tourism. The county is home to concert halls, award-winning theaters, historic cinemas, stunning architecture, museums and art galleries, and some of the finest gardens and arboretums in the country. Arts Montco Week will highlight the people and organizations that make these incredible places inspire thousands of visitors each year with special performances, gallery shows (including the return of the popular Montco Studio Tour) and discount offers. for the public. The festival is free to arts and culture venues, with no in-person or virtual programming requirements, and will include a website, blog, video, public relations and social campaign.

“The goal of Arts Montco Week is to shine a light on the diverse arts, culture and entertainment industries in Montgomery County,” noted Rachel Riley, Vice President of Communications for VFTCB. “These individuals and organizations not only have a tremendous positive economic impact on the region, but also serve as a vital reminder that the arts are essential for everyone.”

Montco Arts Week on the Visit Valley Forge Mobile App

Customers will be able to discover all Arts Montco Week offers and events on the free Visit Valley Forge app. The app is a portable guide to where to stay, play, eat, and shop in Montgomery County. Users will be able to claim special offers under “Maps & Info”, enjoy free family-friendly digital highlights, discover top attractions, search by cuisine-restaurants, 80 hotels, outdoor activities like golf, and more.

Montco Jazz Festival

The first-ever Montco Jazz Festival will celebrate Montgomery County as a musical destination as it showcases the region’s diverse jazz artists and venues. The festivities kick off on Wednesday, September 21 with the All Star Big Band performing at Rivet Canteen and Assembly in Pottstown. This large 16-piece ensemble, which will play big band classics, is sponsored by Montgomery County Community College.

Additional events include Cymande, the British funk band popular in the early 1970s with their unique sound that combined jazz, funk fusion, soul, reggae and afro pop, at Ardmore Music Hall on Saturday September 24; the Terry Klinefelter Trio, a live jazz trio performing standards and original compositions, performing Saturday, September 24 at Community Music School in Collegeville; Peebo Bryson and Oleta Adamstwo of the most important jazz voices of the past 30 years, performing at the Keswick Theater on Sunday 25th September.

A series of jazz brunches on Sunday, September 25 will wrap up the weekend, including performances at Rivet Canteen and Assembly in Pottstown, King of Prussia Mall and Blossom Cafe. For more information, visit artsmontcoweek.com.

Highlighted Events and Promotions

Below is a small selection of the offers available during Arts Montco week; for up-to-date listings, visit artsmontcoweek.com.

Art and exhibitions

Art on the Hill

Various days and times, Art on the Hill, 100 North Main Street, Souderton, PA, Free

“Christo & Jeanne-Claude: The Tom Golden Collection” and “Andrea Modica: Theatrum Equorum” at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College

Various days and times, The Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College, 601 East Main St. Collegeville, PA 19426, Free

The Charles L. Blockson Exhibition at the Center Theater

Days and times vary, The Center Theater, 208 DeKalb St, Norristown, PA 19401, $5-$10

Montgomery County Studio Tour

September 24-25, various studios across Montgomery County, free

Renee Crystal Photographer, Gallery Reception

September 24, 7:30 p.m., Collegeville Community Music School, 775 Main Street West, Trappe, PA, Free

“Scrappy Quilts” and “Back to Black” at Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

Various days and times, Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center, 105 Seminary Street, Pennsburg PA 18063, Free

Courses and workshops

Adult Party with Lego Master Builder at Legoland

September 16, 6:00 p.m., Legoland Discovery Center, Plymouth Meeting Mall, price TBD

Canoe Bird Watching John James Audubon Center

September 22, 6 p.m., John James Audubon Center, 1201 Pawlings Road, Audubon, PA, $30

no WINED & PAINT

Days and times vary, UNWINED & PAINT, 515 Stump Rd., North Wales, Price TBA

Gigs

Cymande at the Ardmore Music Hall

September 22, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Emerald Rae with the Philadelphia Folksong Society

Sept. 16, 8 p.m., Philadelphia Folksong Society, 6156 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia PA, $5-18

Haley Heynderickx & The Westerlies at Ardmore Music Hall

September 20, 7:30 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, Price TBD

Leo Nocentelli (from The Meters) at Ardmore Music Hall

September 25, 7 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Musical Storytime at Collegeville Community Music School

September 24, 10 a.m., Collegeville Community Music School, 775 Main Street West, Trappe, PA, Free

Old 97 at Ardmore Music Hall

September 16, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Pink Talking Fish at Ardmore Music Hall

September 24, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Saved by the 90s at Ardmore Music Hall

September 23, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Sierra Hull at Ardmore Music Hall

September 21, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Steal Your Peach at Ardmore Music Hall

September 17, 8 p.m., Ardmore Music Hall, 23 E Lancaster Ave, Ardmore, PA, price TBD

Theatrical performances

Annual festival of one-act plays for students at Ursinus College

September 16, 6:00 p.m., Berman Outdoor Amphitheater, 601 E Main St, Collegeville, PA, Free

“The Prisoner of Second Avenue” at Act II Playhouse

Various days and times, Act II Playhouse, 56 E. Butler Ave, Amber, PA, $27-$49

“Ripcord” at Playcrafters

Various dates and times, Playcrafters, 2011 Store Rd, Skippack, PA 19474

“CITY” with Horizon Theater

September 15-28, Eisenhower Science and Technology Leadership Academy, 1601 Markley St, Norristown, PA 19401, free

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Upcoming Mexican and Italian restaurants in Erie; Blues and Jazz Festival Food https://medfordjazz.org/upcoming-mexican-and-italian-restaurants-in-erie-blues-and-jazz-festival-food/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 02:02:44 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/upcoming-mexican-and-italian-restaurants-in-erie-blues-and-jazz-festival-food/ A new restaurant, Pueblo Real, was inspected and licensed at 8155 West Ridge Road in Girard. The owner said he plans to open by September 1. The Mexican restaurant has sister establishments in Known and JeffersonOhio. New Italian venue coming soon the old I jump at 2933 W. 12th St., which is owned by Scott […]]]>
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Jazz, tango, port visits, a boat festival and more: what to do this weekend? https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-tango-port-visits-a-boat-festival-and-more-what-to-do-this-weekend/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 18:35:00 +0000 https://medfordjazz.org/jazz-tango-port-visits-a-boat-festival-and-more-what-to-do-this-weekend/ It’s another busy summer weekend in the south, with hundreds of events. For movie buffs there are plenty of films, with family options like Encato and Brave and classics like the Bamba and What happened to Baby Jane? If you don’t like camping for two hours, you can take a tango lesson at the Music […]]]>

It’s another busy summer weekend in the south, with hundreds of events. For movie buffs there are plenty of films, with family options like Encato and Brave and classics like the Bamba and What happened to Baby Jane? If you don’t like camping for two hours, you can take a tango lesson at the Music Center or take the Compton Art Walk. Not to mention refreshing cocktail hour options to cool off after a hot day at the Soft Spirits Pop-Up at the Ace Hotel on Saturday nights, or anytime this weekend at Marina Del Rey’s Whiskey Red’s On the Docks Pop-Up.

FRIDAY

Lucha VaVoom Variety Show: Mexican wrestling with luchadores, burlesque and comedy come together in this theatrical event. Partially inspired by the character of Bad Bunny in the next High-speed train film, there will be links with the Sony function.

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